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An analysis of undergraduate ophthalmology training in Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature148287
Source
Can J Ophthalmol. 2009 Oct;44(5):513-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2009
Author
Jason Noble
Kirandeep Somal
Harmeet S Gill
Wai-Ching Lam
Author Affiliation
Department of Ophthalmology and Vision Sciences, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ont, Canada.
Source
Can J Ophthalmol. 2009 Oct;44(5):513-8
Date
Oct-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Canada
Clinical Competence - standards
Cross-Sectional Studies
Curriculum - standards
Education, Medical, Undergraduate - standards
Female
Guidelines as Topic
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Ophthalmology - education
Questionnaires
Schools, Medical - standards
Societies, Medical
Abstract
To investigate the adequacy of undergraduate ophthalmology education in Canada in comparison with the International Council of Ophthalmology (ICO) guidelines.
Cross-sectional survey.
First-year residents who had graduated from Canadian medical schools.
Eligible residents were invited to participate in an online survey in 2007. Data were categorized by demographic variables, and basic statistics were done.
Responses were obtained from 386 of the 1425 individuals (27.0%) contacted. The majority (64.0%) stated they had "too little" or "no exposure" to ophthalmology in medical school. The majority (76.2%) of respondents stated that they had had 1 week or less of overall exposure to ophthalmology. Sufficient exposure to several ICO core subspecialty areas was reported, including lens/cataract (81.1%) and cornea/external diseases (81.6%); however, some areas did not receive adequate time allocation, such as vitreoretinal disease (41.9%). Similarly, competency was obtained in certain ICO examination skills, including assessment of visual acuity (83.3%) and pupillary reflexes (90.7%) but was not achieved for other skills, such as fundoscopy (52.3%), slit-lamp examination (44.8%), and intraocular pressure assessment (19.9%). When asked whether sufficient ophthalmology knowledge and skills had been obtained during medical school, only 42.9% and 25.9% agreed, respectively.
Undergraduate ophthalmology training in Canada contains gaps in certain key areas. Developing a national, standardized curriculum could ensure that medical students acquire competency in the ophthalmology knowledge and skills required for future clinical practice.
Notes
Comment In: Can J Ophthalmol. 2009 Oct;44(5):499-50119789578
PubMed ID
19789584 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Cancer -- not only a therapeutic problem, but also an important aspect of oncology education in universities].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature121669
Source
Vopr Onkol. 2012;58(3):420-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
2012

Changes in services for students with learning disabilities in U.S. and Canadian medical schools, 1991 to 1997.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature203415
Source
Acad Med. 1998 Dec;73(12):1290-3
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1998
Author
H C Faigel
Author Affiliation
Tufts University School of Medicine, Boston, Massachusetts, USA.
Source
Acad Med. 1998 Dec;73(12):1290-3
Date
Dec-1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Learning Disorders - rehabilitation
Questionnaires
Rehabilitation - legislation & jurisprudence - standards - statistics & numerical data
Retrospective Studies
School Admission Criteria - statistics & numerical data
Schools, Medical - standards
Student Health Services - legislation & jurisprudence - standards - statistics & numerical data
Students, Medical - statistics & numerical data
United States
Abstract
To determine the changes between 1991 and 1997 in the admission policies of and services offered by U.S. and Canadian medical schools to students with learning disabilities.
Between June 1 and August 31, 1997, the author surveyed 144 medical schools in the United States and Canada regarding their services and programs for learning-disabled medical students. The questionnaire was the same one as used in a 1991 study.
Of the medical schools contacted, 106 responded (one Canadian school sent a letter but did not complete the questionnaire). Ninety-four of 96 U.S. schools and seven of the remaining nine Canadian schools said that they accept students with learning disabilities. All of the respondents that accept such students claimed to make some academic accommodations. Most indicated that they would administer non-standard (e.g., untimed) licensing examinations, and many reported that their affiliated postgraduate medical training programs would also make appropriate accommodations for students with learning disabilities.
When compared with the results from the 1991 survey, the new data suggest that medical schools have improved their services for learning-disabled students in response to the Americans with Disabilities Act.
PubMed ID
9883206 View in PubMed
Less detail

Danish medical schools do not meet international recommendations for teaching palliative medicine.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature297870
Source
Dan Med J. 2018 Oct; 65(10):
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Oct-2018
Author
Maria Kolind Brask-Thomsen
Bodil Abild Jespersen
Mogens Grønvold
Per Sjøgren
Mette Asbjoern Neergaard
Author Affiliation
mettneer@rm.dk.
Source
Dan Med J. 2018 Oct; 65(10):
Date
Oct-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Curriculum
Denmark
Education, Medical - standards
Humans
Palliative Care
Schools, Medical - standards
Surveys and Questionnaires
Abstract
Denmark has been ranked low regarding the extent of teaching in palliative care (PC) at medical schools although the Danish Health Authority recommends that all doctors have basic knowledge of PC. The aim of this study was to investigate the contents of and time spent on teaching in PC at the four Danish medical schools and to compare results with recommendations from the European Association of Palliative Care (EAPC).
Data were collected by examining university curricula, course catalogues, etc., using search words based on recommendations from the Palliative Education Assessment Tool and by a questionnaire survey among the university employees responsible for semesters or courses in Danish medical schools.
Teaching in palliative medicine at Danish medical schools is generally sparse and mainly deals with pain management and general aspects of PC. Compared to European recommendations, teaching in, e.g., ethics, spirituality, teamwork and self-reflection is lacking. Furthermore, PC training does not reach the recommended minimum of 40 hours, and examinations in PC are not held. As from the autumn of 2017, the University of Southern Denmark has offered a course that expands teaching in PC and thereby improves compliance with EAPC recommendations; the remaining three medical schools do not, to our knowledge, have any specific plans to increase the extent of teaching activities in palliative medicine.
Teaching in palliative medicine is sparse at all four medical schools in Denmark and should be strengthened to meet Danish as well as European recommendations.
No funding was used for this study.
not relevant.
PubMed ID
30269748 View in PubMed
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Does the site of postgraduate family medicine training predict performance on summative examinations? A comparison of urban and remote programs.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature196999
Source
CMAJ. 2000 Sep 19;163(6):708-11
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-19-2000
Author
R J McKendry
N. Busing
D W Dauphinee
C A Brailovsky
A P Boulais
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine, University of Ottawa, Ont.
Source
CMAJ. 2000 Sep 19;163(6):708-11
Date
Sep-19-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Analysis of Variance
Certification
Education, Distance - standards
Education, Medical, Graduate - methods
Educational Measurement
Family Practice - education
Humans
Ontario
Program Evaluation
Rural Population
Schools, Medical - standards
Urban Population
Abstract
The location of postgraduate medical training is shifting from teaching hospitals in urban centres to community practice in rural and remote settings. We were interested in knowing whether learning, as measured by summative examinations, was comparable between graduates who trained in urban centres and those who trained in remote and rural settings.
Family medicine training programs in Ontario were selected as a model of postgraduate medical training. The results of the 2 summative examinations--the Medical Council of Canada Qualifying Examination (MCCQE) Part II and the College of Family Physicians of Canada (CFPC) certification examination--for graduates of the programs at Ontario's 5 medical schools were compared with the results for graduates of the programs in Sudbury and Thunder Bay from 1994 to 1997. The comparability of these 2 cohorts at entry into training was evaluated using the results of their MCCQE Part I, completed just before the family medicine training.
Between 1994 and 1997, 1013 graduates of family medicine programs (922 at the medical schools and 91 at the remote sites) completed the CFPC certification examination; a subset of 663 completed both the MCCQE Part I and the MCCQE Part II. The MCCQE Part I results for graduates in the remote programs did not differ significantly from those for graduates entering the programs in the medical schools (mean score 531.3 [standard deviation (SD) 69.8] and 521.8 [SD 74.4] respectively, p = 0.33). The MCCQE Part II results did not differ significantly between the 2 groups either (mean score 555.1 [SD 71.7] and 545.0 [SD 76.4] respectively, p = 0.32). Similarly, there were no consistent, significant differences in the results of the CFPC certification examination between the 2 groups.
In this model of postgraduate medical training, learning was comparable between trainees in urban family medicine programs and those in rural, community-based programs. The reasons why this outcome might be unexpected and the limitations on the generalizability of these results are discussed.
Notes
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Comment In: CMAJ. 2001 Feb 20;164(4):462; author reply 46411233865
Comment In: CMAJ. 2001 Feb 20;164(4):462, 46411233864
PubMed ID
11022585 View in PubMed
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Electrocardiography teaching in Canadian family medicine residency programs: a national survey.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature135210
Source
Fam Med. 2011 Apr;43(4):267-71
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2011
Author
Baldeep Paul
Adrian Baranchuk
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine, Queen's University, Kingston, Ontario, Canada.
Source
Fam Med. 2011 Apr;43(4):267-71
Date
Apr-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Clinical Competence - standards
Electrocardiography - methods - standards
Family Practice - education
Health Care Surveys
Humans
Internship and Residency - methods - standards
Schools, Medical - standards - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
Electrocardiography (ECG) interpretation is an essential skill for a family physician. Teaching and learning electrocardiography is a difficult task, in part due to the erosion of knowledge when interpretation is not part of a daily activity. The objective of this study was to assess the current status of electrocardiography teaching in Canadian family medicine residency programs.
A national survey was designed to specifically address the status of the ECG teaching curricula. This national survey was electronically sent to the family medicine program directors of all 17 Canadian accredited medical schools.
Approximately 75% of the schools responded to the survey. There was a great variance among Canadian family medicine residency programs with respect to the time allotment, ECG training location, training faculty, and teaching methods utilized. The goals of each respective program are also quite wide-ranging.
Family medicine residency programs across Canada are quite diverse regarding ECG training curricula and its goals. The need for a homogeneous way of teaching and evaluating has been identified.
PubMed ID
21500000 View in PubMed
Less detail

Family medicine as a career option: how students' attitudes changed during medical school.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature161304
Source
Can Fam Physician. 2007 May;53(5):881-5, 880
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2007
Author
Cheri Bethune
Penelope A Hansen
Diana Deacon
Katrina Hurley
Allison Kirby
Marshall Godwin
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Medicine, Memorial University of Newfoundland, 300 Prince Philip Dr, St John's, NL A1B 3V6. cbethune@mun.ca
Source
Can Fam Physician. 2007 May;53(5):881-5, 880
Date
May-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Canada
Career Choice
Cohort Studies
Curriculum
Education, Medical, Undergraduate - methods
Family Practice - education - manpower
Female
Forecasting
Humans
Male
Questionnaires
Schools, Medical - standards - trends
Students, Medical
Abstract
To track and describe career choice decisions of medical students as they progressed through their undergraduate training.
Quantitative survey of each class at 5 points during their undergraduate experience. Each survey collected qualitative descriptors of students' current career choices.
Faculty of Medicine at Memorial University of Newfoundland in St John's.
Undergraduate medical students in each year from 1999 to 2006.
Number of students considering family medicine as a career option at 5 different data-collection points throughout the medical school curriculum.
Many students considered family medicine as a career choice early in their undergraduate experience. The number of students considering family medicine dropped significantly during the second year of the curriculum. This trend was consistent across all students surveyed. Although interest in family medicine as a career rebounded later in the curriculum, it never fully recovered.
A large percentage of medical students considered family medicine as a career choice when they entered medical school. The percentage dropped significantly by the end of the second year of training. Attention should be directed toward understanding how the undergraduate medical curriculum in the first 2 years can protect and cultivate interest in family medicine as a career choice.
Notes
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PubMed ID
17872751 View in PubMed
Less detail

[History and current situation of medical schools in Finland].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature179790
Source
Duodecim. 2004;120(8):971-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
2004

Hospitals and the changing work environment: promoting gender equity and fair treatment for medical students.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature195174
Source
Med Health R I. 2001 Mar;84(3):76-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2001

27 records – page 1 of 3.