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Academic Alternate Relationship Plans for internal medicine: a lever for health care transformation.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature129973
Source
Open Med. 2011;5(1):e28-32
Publication Type
Article
Date
2011
Author
Allison Bichel
Maria Bacchus
Jon Meddings
John Conly
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine, Calgary Health Region, and University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta.
Source
Open Med. 2011;5(1):e28-32
Date
2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alberta
Diffusion of Innovation
Health Care Reform - methods
Health Care Surveys
Health Services Accessibility - organization & administration
Health services needs and demand
Humans
Internal Medicine - education
Poisson Distribution
Program Development
Schools, Medical - organization & administration - trends
Notes
Cites: Can Fam Physician. 2000 Jul;46:1438-4410925758
Cites: Can Respir J. 2009 Mar-Apr;16(2):49-5419399308
Cites: Can J Cardiol. 2008 Mar;24(3):195-818340388
Cites: CMAJ. 1999 Jun 15;160(12):1710-410410632
PubMed ID
22046217 View in PubMed
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Advancing health care education and practice through research: the University of Toronto, Donald R. Wilson Centre for Research in Education.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature178281
Source
Acad Med. 2004 Oct;79(10):1003-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2004
Author
Brian Hodges
Author Affiliation
University of Toronto, Faculty of Medicine, Donald R. Wilson Centre for Research in Education, University Health Network, 200 Elizabeth Street, 1 Eaton South 565, Toronto, Ontario M5G 2C4 Canada. brian.hodges@utoronto.ca
Source
Acad Med. 2004 Oct;79(10):1003-6
Date
Oct-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Education, Medical - trends
Health Occupations
Humans
Leadership
Ontario
Organizational Case Studies
Organizational Objectives
Research - organization & administration
Schools, Medical - organization & administration
Abstract
The vision of the Wilson Centre for Research in Education at the University of Toronto, Ontario, Canada, is "advancing health care education and practice through research." With a core staff of eight PhD researchers, five full-time administrative staff, 150 clinical faculty members, and over a dozen fellows and visiting professors from around the world, the Wilson Centre has become an international leader in health professional education research. Diversity of ideas and research methodologies, a culture of mutual support and mentorship, and strong support from both the university and a major teaching hospital have propelled the Wilson Centre. Challenges such as focusing research priorities, involving the clinical faculty more extensively, and defining productive international collaborations are among the current issues for academic planning.
PubMed ID
15383365 View in PubMed
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AIDER: a model for social accountability in medical education and practice.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature115994
Source
Med Teach. 2013 Aug;35(8):e1403-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2013
Author
Gurjit Sandhu
Ivneet Garcha
Jessica Sleeth
Karen Yeates
G Ross Walker
Author Affiliation
Postgraduate Medical Education, Faculty of Health Sciences, 70 Barrie Street, Queen’s University, Kingston,ON K7L 3N6, Canada. sandhug@queensu.ca
Source
Med Teach. 2013 Aug;35(8):e1403-8
Date
Aug-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Canada
Disabled Persons
Education, Medical - organization & administration
Healthcare Disparities
Humans
Physicians
Schools, Medical - organization & administration
Sex
Sexism
Social Justice
Socioeconomic Factors
Total Quality Management
Vulnerable Populations
Abstract
Social accountability in healthcare requires physicians and medical institutions to direct their research, services and education activities to adequately address health inequities. The need for greater social accountability has been addressed in numerous national and international healthcare reviews of health disparities and medical education.
The aim of this work is to better understand how to identify underserved populations and address their specific needs and also to provide physicians and medical institutions with a means by which to cultivate social accountability.
The authors reviewed existing literature and prominent models focusing on social accountability, as well as medical education frameworks, and identified the need to engage underserved stakeholders and incorporate education that includes knowledge translation and reciprocity. The AIDER model was developed to satisfy the need in medical education and practice that is not explicitly addressed in previous models.
The AIDER model (Assess, Inquire, Deliver, Educate, Respond) is a continuous monitoring process that explicitly incorporates reciprocal education and continuous collaboration with underserved stakeholders.
This model is an incremental step forward in helping physicians and medical institutions foster a culture of social accountability both in individual practice and throughout the continuum of medical education.
PubMed ID
23444886 View in PubMed
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Alternative and complementary medicine in Canadian medical schools: a survey.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature202524
Source
CMAJ. 1999 Mar 23;160(6):816-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-23-1999
Author
J. Ruedy
D M Kaufman
H. MacLeod
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Medicine, Dalhousie University, Halifax, NS. John.Ruedy@Dal.Ca
Source
CMAJ. 1999 Mar 23;160(6):816-7
Date
Mar-23-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Complementary Therapies - education
Curriculum
Data Collection
Education, Medical, Undergraduate - organization & administration
Humans
Questionnaires
Schools, Medical - organization & administration
Notes
Cites: Prim Care. 1993 Sep;20(3):509-228378448
Cites: Am J Public Health. 1990 Jul;80(7):814-82356904
Cites: JAMA. 1998 Sep 2;280(9):784-79729989
Cites: J R Soc Med. 1997 Jan;90(1):19-229059376
Comment In: CMAJ. 1999 Jul 27;161(2):128-910439818
PubMed ID
10189426 View in PubMed
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Source
CMAJ. 1990 Nov 15;143(10):1097-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-15-1990
Author
M J Ashley
J M Brewster
Y C Chow
J G Rankin
E. Single
H A Skinner
Author Affiliation
Department of Preventive Medicine and Biostatistics, Faculty of Medicine, University of Toronto.
Source
CMAJ. 1990 Nov 15;143(10):1097-8
Date
Nov-15-1990
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alcoholism - prevention & control
Canada
Clinical Competence - standards
Curriculum - trends
Education, Medical - organization & administration
Humans
Leadership
Schools, Medical - organization & administration
PubMed ID
2224679 View in PubMed
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An e-learning course in medical immunology: does it improve learning outcome?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature125277
Source
Med Teach. 2012;34(9):e649-53
Publication Type
Article
Date
2012
Author
Sondre Boye
Torolf Moen
Torstein Vik
Author Affiliation
Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Norway. sondreb@stud.ntnu.no
Source
Med Teach. 2012;34(9):e649-53
Date
2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Allergy and Immunology - education
Clinical Competence
Curriculum
Education, Medical - organization & administration
Educational Status
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Humans
Learning
Linear Models
Norway
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Schools, Medical - organization & administration
Statistics as Topic
Students, Medical
Teaching - methods
Abstract
E-learning is used by most medical students almost daily and several studies have shown e-learning to improve learning outcome in small-scale interventions. However, few studies have explored the effects of e-learning in immunology.
To study the effect of an e-learning package in immunology on learning outcomes in a written integrated examination and to examine student satisfaction with the e-learning package.
All second-year students at a Norwegian medical school were offered an animated e-learning package in basic immunology as a supplement to the regular teaching. Each student's log-on-time was recorded and linked with the student's score on multiple choice questions included in an integrated end-of-the-year written examination. Student satisfaction was assessed through a questionnaire.
The intermediate-range students (interquartile range) on average scored 3.6% better on the immunology part of the examination per hour they had used the e-learning package (p = 0.0046) and log-on-time explained 17% of the variance in immunology score. The best and the less skilled students' examination outcomes were not affected by the e-learning. The e-learning was well appreciated among the students.
Use of an e-learning package in immunology in addition to regular teaching improved learning outcomes for intermediate-range students.
Notes
Comment In: Med Teach. 2012;34(12):1087-822931144
PubMed ID
22497322 View in PubMed
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Between a rock and a hard place: the question of money at St. Petersburg women's clinics.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature157338
Source
Int J Health Serv. 2008;38(2):357-77
Publication Type
Article
Date
2008
Author
Meri Larivaara
Tatiana Dubikaytis
Olga Kuznetsova
Elina Hemminki
Author Affiliation
STAKES, Helsinki, Finland. meri.larivaara@stakes.fi
Source
Int J Health Serv. 2008;38(2):357-77
Date
2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Gynecology - organization & administration
Hospitals, Maternity - organization & administration
Humans
National Health Programs - economics - organization & administration
Obstetrics - organization & administration
Physicians - organization & administration
Quality of Health Care - organization & administration
Russia
Schools, Medical - organization & administration
Women's Health Services - economics - organization & administration
Abstract
The new financing mechanisms introduced into the Russian health care system since the beginning of the 1990s have not resolved its severe financial problems. This article examines the consequences for outpatient services and the daily work of individual doctors in St. Petersburg, using women's reproductive health services as a case example. Interview and observational data reveal a constant opposition between formal rules and informal practices at both the administrative and polyclinic levels. Polyclinics for women's reproductive health services have developed various strategies as a response to insufficient financing, but many of these strategies are questionable within the current mandatory health insurance system. Ordinary doctors perceive the development as mainly negative. The results raise the question of increasing arbitrariness, from patients' perspective, in the health services provided. The study illustrates how in a post-socialist context, the past constantly permeates the present in the form of novel adaptations to the new social context.
PubMed ID
18459285 View in PubMed
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[Bill Gates and the lack of student influence on Karolinska Institutet].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature258263
Source
Lakartidningen. 2014 Jun 17-Jul 1;111(25-26):1134; discussion 1134
Publication Type
Article
Author
Jincheng Zhao
Source
Lakartidningen. 2014 Jun 17-Jul 1;111(25-26):1134; discussion 1134
Language
Swedish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Humans
Schools, Medical - organization & administration
Students, Health Occupations - psychology
Sweden
PubMed ID
25072080 View in PubMed
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Canada's new medical school: The Northern Ontario School of Medicine: social accountability through distributed community engaged learning.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature147622
Source
Acad Med. 2009 Oct;84(10):1459-64
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2009
Author
Roger P Strasser
Joel H Lanphear
William G McCready
Maureen H Topps
D Dan Hunt
Marie C Matte
Author Affiliation
Northern Ontario School of Medicine, 935 Ramsey Lake Road, Sudbury, Ontario P3E 2C6, Canada. roger.strasser@normed.ca
Source
Acad Med. 2009 Oct;84(10):1459-64
Date
Oct-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accreditation
Clinical Clerkship - organization & administration
Curriculum
Education, Medical, Undergraduate - economics - organization & administration - trends
Financial Support
Humans
Internship and Residency - organization & administration - standards
Medically underserved area
Models, Educational
Ontario
Physicians - supply & distribution
Program Development
Rural Population
Schools, Medical - organization & administration
Social Responsibility
Students, Medical - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
Like many rural regions around the world, Northern Ontario has a chronic shortage of doctors. Recognizing that medical graduates who have grown up in a rural area are more likely to practice in the rural setting, the Government of Ontario, Canada, decided in 2001 to establish a new medical school in the region with a social accountability mandate to contribute to improving the health of the people and communities of Northern Ontario. The Northern Ontario School of Medicine (NOSM) is a joint initiative of Laurentian University and Lakehead University, which are located 700 miles apart. This paper outlines the development and implementation of NOSM, Canada's first new medical school in more than 30 years. NOSM is a rural distributed community-based medical school which actively seeks to recruit students into its MD program who come from Northern Ontario or from similar northern, rural, remote, Aboriginal, Francophone backgrounds. The holistic, cohesive curriculum for the MD program relies heavily on electronic communications to support distributed community engaged learning. In the classroom and in clinical settings, students explore cases from the perspective of physicians in Northern Ontario. Clinical education takes place in a wide range of community and health service settings, so that the students experience the diversity of communities and cultures in Northern Ontario. NOSM graduates will be skilled physicians ready and able to undertake postgraduate training anywhere, but with a special affinity for and comfort with pursuing postgraduate training and clinical practice in Northern Ontario.
PubMed ID
19881443 View in PubMed
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Community engagement: a key to successful rural clinical education.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature141053
Source
Rural Remote Health. 2010 Jul-Sep;10(3):1543
Publication Type
Article
Author
Roger P Strasser
Author Affiliation
Northern Ontario School of Medicine, Sudbury, Ontario, Canada. roger.strasser@normed.ca
Source
Rural Remote Health. 2010 Jul-Sep;10(3):1543
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Attitude of Health Personnel
Community Medicine - education
Curriculum
Education, Distance - organization & administration
Education, Medical - organization & administration
Hospitals, Rural
Humans
Interinstitutional Relations
Medically underserved area
Ontario
Professional Practice Location
Program Evaluation
Rural health services - organization & administration
Schools, Medical - organization & administration
Abstract
Evaluation of rural clinical attachments has demonstrated that the rural setting provides a high-quality clinical learning environment that is of potential value to all medical students. Specifically, rural clinical education provides more 'hands on' experience for students in which they are exposed to a wide range of common health problems and develop a high level of clinical competence. Northern Ontario in Canada is a large rural region that has a chronic shortage of healthcare providers. The Northern Ontario School of Medicine (NOSM) was established with a social accountability mandate to contribute to improving the health of the people and communities of Northern Ontario, and is a joint initiative of Laurentian University, Sudbury, and Lakehead University, Thunder Bay, which are over 1000 km apart. The NOSM has developed a distinctive model of medical education known as distributed community engaged learning (DCEL), which weaves together various recent trends in medical education including case-based learning, community-based medical education, electronic distance education and rural-based medical education (including the preceptor model). The NOSM curriculum is grounded in Northern Ontario and relies heavily on electronic communications to support DCEL. In the classroom and in clinical settings, students explore cases from the perspective of doctors in Northern Ontario. In addition, DCEL involves community engagement through which communities actively participate in hosting students and contribute to their learning.This paper explores the conceptual and practical issues of community engagement, with specific focus on successful rural clinical education. Community engagement takes the notion of 'community' in health sciences education beyond being simply community based in that the community actively contributes to hosting the students and enhancing their learning experiences. This is consistent with the focus on social accountability in medical education. Implementing community engagement is quite challenging; however; its potential benefits are substantial and include the improved recruitment and retention of healthcare providers who are responsive to cultural diversity and community needs and are collaborating members of the whole health team.
PubMed ID
20815653 View in PubMed
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70 records – page 1 of 7.