Skip header and navigation

Refine By

445 records – page 1 of 45.

[50th anniversary of the Chair of Pediatrics and Adolescent Medicine of the Order of Lenin central Institute of Graduate Training of Physicians].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature240287
Source
Gig Sanit. 1984 Aug;(8):38-40
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-1984

[70 years of S.S. Mikhailov Department of Operative Surgery and Clinical Anatomy of Orenburg State Medical Academy].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature262448
Source
Morfologiia. 2014;146(5):92-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
2014

[90th anniversary of Occupational Medicine Department in I.I. Metchnikov North-Western State Medical University--results, achievements, prospects].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature117707
Source
Med Tr Prom Ekol. 2013;(12):1-3
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
Source
Med Tr Prom Ekol. 2013;(12):1-3
Date
2013
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Anniversaries and Special Events
Education, Medical - history
History, 20th Century
Humans
Occupational Medicine - education - history
Russia
Schools, Medical - history
Abstract
The authors briefly report history, development, achievements and prospects of Occupational Medicine Department in I.I. Metchnikov North-Western State Medical University.
PubMed ID
24745175 View in PubMed
Less detail

[250 years of the Department of Human Anatomy of the I. M. Sechenov First Moscow State Medical University (1764-2014)].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature262449
Source
Morfologiia. 2014;146(5):88-91
Publication Type
Article
Date
2014

Abortion training in Canadian obstetrics and gynecology residency programs.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature168081
Source
Obstet Gynecol. 2006 Aug;108(2):309-14
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2006
Author
Genevieve Roy
Ram Parvataneni
Brooke Friedman
Katherine Eastwood
Phillip D Darney
Jody Steinauer
Author Affiliation
University of Montreal, Montreal, Canada.
Source
Obstet Gynecol. 2006 Aug;108(2):309-14
Date
Aug-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Abortion, Therapeutic - education - utilization
Adult
Canada
Clinical Competence
Female
Gynecology - education
Humans
Internship and Residency - statistics & numerical data
Male
Obstetrics - education
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Trimesters
Questionnaires
Schools, Medical
Abstract
To study abortion training in Canadian obstetrics and gynecology (ob-gyn) residency programs.
An anonymous questionnaire was sent to all postgraduate year (PGY)-4 and PGY-5 ob-gyn residents (n=130) and residency program directors (n=16) in Canada. The questionnaires inquired about demographic information, details of abortion training, resident participation in training, and intention to provide abortions after residency.
Ninety-two of 130 residents (71%) and 15 of 16 program directors (94%) responded. Abortion training is considered routine in approximately half of programs and elective in half. The majority of residents (71%) participated in abortion training, and half plan to do elective abortions after residency. More than half of residents felt competent after training to perform first-trimester aspiration and second-trimester inductions but did not feel competent in first-trimester medical abortions or dilation and evacuation (D&E). Residents were more likely to participate in training if the program arranged the training for residents (P=.04) and were more likely to intend to provide abortions if the training was considered routine (P=.02), while controlling for all significant demographic and training variables.
Most Canadian ob-gyn programs offer some training in elective abortion, but only half include it routinely in training, and the minority of residents feels competent in D&E and medical abortion. Integrated abortion training was associated with greater resident participation in training and increased likelihood of intention to provide abortions after residency.
PubMed ID
16880300 View in PubMed
Less detail

Academic Alternate Relationship Plans for internal medicine: a lever for health care transformation.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature129973
Source
Open Med. 2011;5(1):e28-32
Publication Type
Article
Date
2011
Author
Allison Bichel
Maria Bacchus
Jon Meddings
John Conly
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine, Calgary Health Region, and University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta.
Source
Open Med. 2011;5(1):e28-32
Date
2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alberta
Diffusion of Innovation
Health Care Reform - methods
Health Care Surveys
Health Services Accessibility - organization & administration
Health services needs and demand
Humans
Internal Medicine - education
Poisson Distribution
Program Development
Schools, Medical - organization & administration - trends
Notes
Cites: Can Fam Physician. 2000 Jul;46:1438-4410925758
Cites: Can Respir J. 2009 Mar-Apr;16(2):49-5419399308
Cites: Can J Cardiol. 2008 Mar;24(3):195-818340388
Cites: CMAJ. 1999 Jun 15;160(12):1710-410410632
PubMed ID
22046217 View in PubMed
Less detail

The academic half-day in Canadian neurology residency programs.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature177008
Source
Can J Neurol Sci. 2004 Nov;31(4):511-3
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2004
Author
Colin Chalk
Author Affiliation
Department of Neurology and Neurosurgery, Centre for Medical Education, McGill University, Montreal, QC, Canada.
Source
Can J Neurol Sci. 2004 Nov;31(4):511-3
Date
Nov-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Administrative Personnel
Adult
Canada
Education, Medical - organization & administration - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Internship and Residency - organization & administration
Neurology - education
Questionnaires
Schools, Medical - statistics & numerical data
Teaching - methods
Abstract
The academic half-day (AHD) appears to have become widespread in Canadian neurology residency programs, but there is little published information about the structure, content, or impact of the AHD.
A written questionnaire was sent to the directors of all active Canadian adult and child neurology residency programs.
All 21 program directors responded. An AHD was operating in 15/15 adult and 5/6 child neurology programs. The AHD typically lasts three hours, and occurs weekly, 10 months per year. Most of the weekly sessions are lectures or seminars, usually led by clinicians, with about 90% resident attendance. Course-like features (required textbook, examinations) are present in many AHDs. There is a wide range of topics, from disease pathophysiology to practice management, with considerable variation between programs.
Almost all Canadian neurology programs now have an AHD. Academic half-days are broadly similar in content and format across the country, and residents now spend a substantial portion of their training attending the AHD. The impact of the AHD on how residency programs are organized, and on the learning, clinical work, and professional development of residents merits further study.
PubMed ID
15595258 View in PubMed
Less detail

Access to palliative medicine training for Canadian family medicine residents.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature205465
Source
Palliat Med. 1998 Jan;12(1):23-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-1998
Author
D. Oneschuk
E. Bruera
Author Affiliation
Edmonton Regional Palliative Care Program, University of Alberta, Canada.
Source
Palliat Med. 1998 Jan;12(1):23-7
Date
Jan-1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Education, Medical, Graduate
Family Practice - education
Humans
Palliative Care
Schools, Medical
Teaching - methods
Abstract
The authors conducted a nine-item mail questionnaire of the 16 Canadian family medicine teaching programme directors to determine the accessibility and operation of palliative care education for their respective family medicine residents. All 16 faculties of medicine responded (100%). The survey revealed that while all universities offer elective time in palliative care only five out of 16 (31%) have a mandatory rotation. The median durations of the mandatory and elective rotations are limited to two and three-and-a-half weeks, respectively. The majority of the universities offer formal lectures in palliative care (12/16, 75%) and educational reading material (13/16, 81%), with the main format in 14/16 (87%) of the sites being case-based learning. The two most common sites for teaching to occur for the residents are the community/outpatient environment and an acute palliative care unit. Fifty-six per cent (9/16) of the universities have designated faculty positions for palliative medicine with a median number of two positions per site. Only one centre offers a specific palliative medicine examination during the rotation. Feedback from the residents regarding their respective palliative medicine programmes were positive overall. Findings from our survey indicate an ongoing need for improved education in palliative medicine at the postgraduate level.
PubMed ID
9616456 View in PubMed
Less detail

"A chance to show yourself" - how do applicants approach medical school admission essays?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature131055
Source
Med Teach. 2011;33(10):e541-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
2011
Author
Jonathan S White
Jean-Francois Lemay
Keith Brownell
Jocelyn Lockyer
Author Affiliation
University of Alberta, Canada. jswhite1@ualberta.ca
Source
Med Teach. 2011;33(10):e541-8
Date
2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Education, Medical - methods
Educational Status
Humans
Pilot Projects
Qualitative Research
School Admission Criteria
Schools, Medical
Tape Recording
Test Taking Skills - methods - psychology
Writing
Abstract
Although essay questions are used in the admissions process in many medical schools, there has been little research on how applicants respond to essay questions.
The purpose of this study was to explore how applicants to medical school approach essay questions used in the selection process.
Qualitative analysis was conducted on 240 randomly selected essays written by individuals applying to a single Canadian medical school in 2007 using a modified grounded theory approach to develop a conceptual framework which was checked in interviews with applicants.
Three core variables were identified: "balancing service and reward," "anticipating the physician role," and "readiness." We described the overall approach of applicants as "taking stock," writing about their journeys to the selection process, their experiences of the process itself, and about their anticipated future in medicine.
Our findings suggest a disconnect between the approach of the applicants (to "show themselves" and be selected as individuals) and the stated intent of the process (to select applicants based on "objective" criteria). Our findings raise important questions about how applicants represent themselves when applying for medical school and suggest that it is important to understand the applicant's point of view when developing questions for selection processes.
PubMed ID
21942490 View in PubMed
Less detail

445 records – page 1 of 45.