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[2 YEARS OF EXPERIENCE WITH FLUORIDE BRUSHING OF TEETH OF SCHOOL CHILDREN IN MODUM.]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature45167
Source
Dtsch Zahnarztl Z. 1965 Apr 1;20:336-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-1-1965
Author
K. HUNSTADBRATEN
Source
Dtsch Zahnarztl Z. 1965 Apr 1;20:336-8
Date
Apr-1-1965
Language
German
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Child
Fluorides, Topical
Norway
School Health Services
PubMed ID
14286235 View in PubMed
Less detail

[3 voices on developments in school health care]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature39861
Source
Vardfacket. 1984 Apr 5;8(7):24-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-5-1984
Author
H. Falk
T. Engman
Source
Vardfacket. 1984 Apr 5;8(7):24-5
Date
Apr-5-1984
Language
Swedish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Child
Humans
School Health Services - trends
School Nursing - trends
Sweden
PubMed ID
6565440 View in PubMed
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3-year results of a collaborative school-based oral health program in a remote First Nations community

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature101097
Source
Rural and Remote Health. 2008 Apr-Jun;8(2):882
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-Jun 2008
Author
Macnab, AJ
Rozmus, J
Benton, D
Gagnon, FA
Author Affiliation
University of British Columbia, Department of Pediatrics, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada
Hartley Bay Nursing Station, Hartley Bay, British Columbia, Canada
Gagnon Research Associates, Surrey, British Columbia, Canada
Source
Rural and Remote Health. 2008 Apr-Jun;8(2):882
Date
Apr-Jun 2008
Language
English
Geographic Location
Canada
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aboriginal children
Brush-ins
Canada
Collaborative program
Cross-sectional study
Decayed, Missing, and Filled Teeth (DMFT) score
Dental health
Educational presentations
First Nations
Fluoride application
Oral health and knowledge
Recognition/incentive scheme
School-based program
Abstract
INTRODUCTION: Surveys of dental health among Aboriginal children in Canada, using scales such as the Decayed, Missing, and Filled Teeth (DMFT) score, indicate that Aboriginal children have 2 to 3 times poorer oral health compared with other populations. A remote First Nations community approached requested assistance in addressing the health of their children. The objective was to work with the community to improve oral health and knowledge among school children. The hypothesis formulated was that after 3 years of the program there would be a significant decrease in dmft/DMFT (primary/permanent) score.METHODS: This was a cross-sectional study of all school-aged children in a small, remote First Nations community. Pre- and post- intervention evaluation of oral health was conducted by a dentist not involved in the study. The intervention consisted of a school-based program with daily brush-ins, fluoride application, educational presentations, and a recognition/incentive scheme.RESULTS: Twenty-six children were assessed prior to the intervention, representing 45% of the 58 children then in the community. All 40 children in the community were assessed following the intervention. Prior to the intervention, 8% of children were cavity free. Following 3 years of the intervention, 32% were cavity free. Among the 13 children assessed both pre- and post-intervention, dmft/DMFT score improved significantly (p
PubMed ID
18444770 View in PubMed
Less detail

3-year results of a collaborative school-based oral health program in a remote First Nations community.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature157485
Source
Rural Remote Health. 2008 Apr-Jun;8(2):882
Publication Type
Article
Author
A J Macnab
J. Rozmus
D. Benton
F A Gagnon
Author Affiliation
University of British Columbia, Department of Pediatrics, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada.
Source
Rural Remote Health. 2008 Apr-Jun;8(2):882
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
British Columbia
Child
Cross-Sectional Studies
Dental Care for Children - methods
Health Education - methods
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Humans
Indians, North American
Medically underserved area
Oral Hygiene - education - methods
School Health Services
Tooth Diseases - ethnology - prevention & control
Abstract
Surveys of dental health among Aboriginal children in Canada, using scales such as the Decayed, Missing, and Filled Teeth (DMFT) score, indicate that Aboriginal children have 2 to 3 times poorer oral health compared with other populations. A remote First Nations community approached requested assistance in addressing the health of their children. The objective was to work with the community to improve oral health and knowledge among school children. The hypothesis formulated was that after 3 years of the program there would be a significant decrease in dmft/DMFT (primary/permanent) score.
This was a cross-sectional study of all school-aged children in a small, remote First Nations community. Pre- and post- intervention evaluation of oral health was conducted by a dentist not involved in the study. The intervention consisted of a school-based program with daily brush-ins, fluoride application, educational presentations, and a recognition/incentive scheme.
Twenty-six children were assessed prior to the intervention, representing 45% of the 58 children then in the community. All 40 children in the community were assessed following the intervention. Prior to the intervention, 8% of children were cavity free. Following 3 years of the intervention, 32% were cavity free. Among the 13 children assessed both pre- and post-intervention, dmft/DMFT score improved significantly (p
PubMed ID
18444770 View in PubMed
Less detail

[3 years' experience with toothbrushing with fluorides in school children in Modum]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature45012
Source
Nor Tannlaegeforen Tid. 1966 Mar;76(3):164-73
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-1966
Author
K. Hunstadbråten
Source
Nor Tannlaegeforen Tid. 1966 Mar;76(3):164-73
Date
Mar-1966
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Child
Dental caries
Female
Fluorides, Topical
Humans
Male
Norway
School Health Services
Statistics
PubMed ID
5219349 View in PubMed
Less detail

A 4-year, cluster-randomized, controlled childhood obesity prevention study: STOPP.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature99038
Source
Int J Obes (Lond). 2009 Apr;33(4):408-17
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2009
Author
C. Marcus
G. Nyberg
A. Nordenfelt
M. Karpmyr
J. Kowalski
U. Ekelund
Author Affiliation
Division of Pediatrics, Karolinska Institutet, Department of Clinical Science, Intervention and Technology, National Childhood Obesity Centre, Stockholm, Sweden. claude.marcus@ki.se
Source
Int J Obes (Lond). 2009 Apr;33(4):408-17
Date
Apr-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Anthropometry
Child
Cluster analysis
Female
Health Promotion - organization & administration
Humans
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Obesity - epidemiology - prevention & control
Overweight - epidemiology - prevention & control
Parents - psychology
Physical Fitness - psychology
Prevalence
Risk Reduction Behavior
School Health Services
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To assess the efficacy of a school-based intervention programme to reduce the prevalence of overweight in 6 to 10-year-old children. DESIGN: Cluster-randomized, controlled study. SUBJECTS: A total of 3135 boys and girls in grades 1-4 were included in the study. METHODS: Ten schools were selected in Stockholm county area and randomized to intervention (n=5) and control (n=5) schools. Low-fat dairy products and whole-grain bread were promoted and all sweets and sweetened drinks were eliminated in intervention schools. Physical activity (PA) was aimed to increase by 30 min day(-1) during school time and sedentary behaviour restricted during after school care time. PA was measured by accelerometry. Eating habits at home were assessed by parental report. Eating disorders were evaluated by self-report. RESULTS: The prevalence of overweight and obesity decreased by 3.2% (from 20.3 to 17.1) in intervention schools compared with an increase of 2.8% (from 16.1 to 18.9) in control schools (P
PubMed ID
19290010 View in PubMed
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5-years later - have faculty integrated medical genetics into nurse practitioner curriculum?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature106400
Source
Int J Nurs Educ Scholarsh. 2013;10
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
Author
Ann H Maradiegue
Quannetta T Edwards
Diane Seibert
Source
Int J Nurs Educ Scholarsh. 2013;10
Date
2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Advanced Practice Nursing - education
Attitude of Health Personnel
Canada
Clinical Competence
Curriculum
Faculty, Nursing
Genetics, Medical - education
Humans
Molecular Medicine - education
Questionnaires
Schools, Nursing
United States
Abstract
Abstract Many genetic/genomic educational opportunities are available to assist nursing faculty in their knowledge and understanding of genetic/genomics. This study was conducted to assess advance practice nursing faculty members' current knowledge of medical genetics/genomics, their integration of genetics/genomics content into advance practice nursing curricula, any prior formal training/education in genetics/genomics, and their comfort level in teaching genetics/genomic content. A secondary aim was to conduct a comparative analysis of the 2010 data to a previous study conducted in 2005, to determine changes that have taken place during that time period. During a national nurse practitioner faculty conference, 85 nurse practitioner faculty voluntarily completed surveys. Approximately 70% of the 2010 faculty felt comfortable teaching basic genetic/genomic concepts compared to 50% in 2005. However, there continue to be education gaps in the genetic/genomic content taught to advance practice nursing students. If nurses are going to be a crucial member of the health-care team, they must achieve the requisite competencies to deliver the increasingly complex care patients require.
Notes
Erratum In: Int J Nurs Educ Scholarsh. 2013;10: doi/10.1515/ijnes-2013-0094
PubMed ID
24176964 View in PubMed
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[10 years of dental caries prophylaxis in Varberg/Sweden]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature41725
Source
Zahnarztl Mitt. 1978 Mar 1;68(5):259-61
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-1-1978
Author
F. Rosenkranz
Source
Zahnarztl Mitt. 1978 Mar 1;68(5):259-61
Date
Mar-1-1978
Language
German
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Child
Dental Caries - epidemiology - prevention & control
Dental Health Surveys
Humans
School Dentistry
Sweden
PubMed ID
273357 View in PubMed
Less detail

3757 records – page 1 of 376.