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Victimization and psychopathic features in a population-based sample of Finnish adolescents.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature290116
Source
Child Abuse Negl. 2016 10; 60:58-66
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
10-2016
Author
Suvi Saukkonen
Eeva T Aronen
Taina Laajasalo
Venla Salmi
Janne Kivivuori
Markus Jokela
Author Affiliation
University of Helsinki and Helsinki University Hospital, Children's Hospital, Child Psychiatry, Helsinki, Finland. Electronic address: suvi.saukkonen@helsinki.fi.
Source
Child Abuse Negl. 2016 10; 60:58-66
Date
10-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adolescent Behavior
Aggression
Antisocial Personality Disorder
Bullying
Crime Victims
Female
Finland
Humans
Male
Mental Disorders - psychology
Schools
Self Report
Violence
Abstract
We examined different forms of victimization experiences in relation to psychopathic features and whether these associations differed in boys and girls among 4855 Finnish school adolescents aged 15-16 years. Psychopathic features were measured with the Antisocial Process Screening Device- Self Report (APSD-SR). Victimization was assessed with questions about violent and abusive experiences across lifetime and within the last 12 months. Results from linear regression analysis showed that victimization was significantly associated with higher APSD-SR total scores, more strongly in girls than boys. Recent (12-month) victimization showed significance in the relationship between victimization and psychopathic features; especially recent sexual abuse and parental corporal punishment were strong determinants of higher APSD-SR total scores. The present study demonstrates novel findings on how severe victimization experiences relate to psychopathic features in community youth, especially in girls. The findings underscore the need for comprehensive evaluation of victimization experiences when psychopathic features are present in youth.
PubMed ID
27690216 View in PubMed
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[The impact of ecological and socio-hygienic factors on the health status of children of school age].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature290149
Source
Gig Sanit. 2016; 95(8):760-4
Publication Type
Journal Article
Author
V V Vasilyev
M V Perekusikhin
Yu V Korochkina
Source
Gig Sanit. 2016; 95(8):760-4
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Child
Environmental Exposure - adverse effects - analysis - prevention & control
Environmental Health - organization & administration - standards
Female
Health Status Disparities
Humans
Male
Nutritional Status
Population
Public Health - methods
Russia - epidemiology
School Health Services - statistics & numerical data
Social Environment
Abstract
Negative trends in incidence rates of children and adolescents of the city of Penza are due to the influence of both environmental factors as well as the educational process. Hygienic trouble in the city of Penza determines air pollution emissions of road transport, as evidenced by the high levels of morbidity rate in children and adolescents. The priorities for the correction factors are conditions and the organization of nutrition, physical education. There are identified the most important lifestyle factors for senior pupils that need the solution.
PubMed ID
29430902 View in PubMed
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[Ecological-hygienic aspects of the prevalence of respiratory diseases in adolescents and children of the Primorsky Krai].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature290151
Source
Gig Sanit. 2016; 95(8):749-53
Publication Type
Journal Article
Author
P F Kiku
B I Geltser
M V Yarygina
S N Beniowa
T V Gorborukova
V G Moreva
N S Shiter
K M Sabirova
M A Mezentseva
Source
Gig Sanit. 2016; 95(8):749-53
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Air Pollution - adverse effects - analysis
Child
Environmental Exposure - adverse effects - analysis
Environmental Illness - diagnosis - epidemiology - prevention & control
Environmental Pollution - analysis - prevention & control
Female
Hazardous Substances - adverse effects - analysis
Humans
Inhalation Exposure
Male
Respiratory Tract Diseases - diagnosis - epidemiology - prevention & control
Risk Assessment - methods
Russia - epidemiology
School Health Services - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
There was executed the ecologic-hygienic assessment of the distribution of respiratory diseases prevalence in bioclimatic zones of the Primorsky Krai. The aim of the study was a systematic assessment of the impact of ecological-hygienic factors of environment on the distribution of respiratory diseases in adolescents and children of the Primorsky region. As an information database there were used indices of the prevalence of diseases of the respiratory system of the ICD-10 class of the official statistical report forms for the period of2000-2013 and the parameters of the environment offactor modules (6 - socio-sanitary, 5 - environmental). The numerical values of modules offactors were determined according to a specially developed scoring scale. The study of the prevalence was carried out with the use of a classical method of data analysis - descriptive statistics, Chi-square criteria. By means of the method of regression analysis from the SPSS package software there was established the relationship of environmental factors and the level of the prevalence of diseases, and were calculated values of the factor loadings influencing on the morbidity rate of children and adolescents. The study revealed that in the structure of morbidity diseases of the respiratory system account of 39% in adolescents, 61% - in children. Constructed predictive models describe the trend of the increasing in the prevalence in adolescents and children. Over the past 15 years, the level of respiratory diseases morbidity rate increased by 46.1%. It is established that the prevalence of respiratory diseases in children and adolescents from various districts of the Primorsky territory depends on the features of the bioclimatic zones and the degree of sanitary-hygienic situation, as well as combinations of parameters that form these zones; the highest cumulative level of the prevalence is observed in the bioclimatic zone of the coast, that is caused by the various degree of the impact of biotropic factors of environment; The prevalence of diseases of respiratory system is mainly affected by bioclimatic factors: residence in an area of high humidity, temperature swings, movements of air masses in combination with air pollution.
PubMed ID
29430900 View in PubMed
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[Assessment of the efficiency of prevention of iodine deficiency among the children’s population of the city of Mezhdurechensk of the Kemerovo region].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature290159
Source
Gig Sanit. 2016; 95(5):471-6
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
2016
Author
N V Tapeshkina
A Y Perevalov
Source
Gig Sanit. 2016; 95(5):471-6
Date
2016
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Child
Child, Preschool
Female
Health Status Indicators
Humans
Iodine - deficiency - pharmacology - urine
Male
Nutritional Requirements
Population
School Health Services - organization & administration - statistics & numerical data
Siberia - epidemiology
Sodium Chloride, Dietary - pharmacology
Thyroid Diseases - epidemiology - etiology - prevention & control
Abstract
In the article there are presented results of a study of indices of ioduria in preschool kids and school children of the city of Mezhdurechensk (south of the Kemerovo region). 411 children aged of 3-17 years participated in the study. The median of ioduria on preschooler kids was 97,0 pg/l, and the proportion of urine samples with iodine levels less than 50 pg/l - 1,0%. The median of ioduria in school children is 98,0 pg/l, the percentage of urine samples with iodine levels less than 50 pg/l accounts for 1,3%. On average, on the population of children there was established that the percentage of urine samples with iodine levels from 50-100 pg/l (mild deficiency) was detected in 53,5% of children. Comparative analysis of indices of the level of ioduria according to data obtained in 2008 and 2014 in a group of school children showed that the measures taken to prevent diseases caused by iodine deficiency (the use of iodized salt in the diet of children and adolescents from organized groups on a regular basis) have given positive results.
PubMed ID
29424208 View in PubMed
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Early preschool environments and gender: Effects of gender pedagogy in Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature290236
Source
J Exp Child Psychol. 2017 Oct; 162:1-17
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Oct-2017
Author
Kristin Shutts
Ben Kenward
Helena Falk
Anna Ivegran
Christine Fawcett
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychology, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI 53706, USA. Electronic address: kshutts@wisc.edu.
Source
J Exp Child Psychol. 2017 Oct; 162:1-17
Date
Oct-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Child
Child, Preschool
Female
Gender Identity
Humans
Male
Schools
Sex Factors
Social Environment
Stereotyping
Sweden
Teaching
Abstract
To test how early social environments affect children's consideration of gender, 3- to 6-year-old children (N=80) enrolled in gender-neutral or typical preschool programs in the central district of a large Swedish city completed measures designed to assess their gender-based social preferences, stereotypes, and automatic encoding. Compared with children in typical preschools, a greater proportion of children in the gender-neutral school were interested in playing with unfamiliar other-gender children. In addition, children attending the gender-neutral preschool scored lower on a gender stereotyping measure than children attending typical preschools. Children at the gender-neutral school, however, were not less likely to automatically encode others' gender. The findings suggest that gender-neutral pedagogy has moderate effects on how children think and feel about people of different genders but might not affect children's tendency to spontaneously notice gender.
PubMed ID
28551105 View in PubMed
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School-based cognitive behavioral interventions for anxious youth: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature290257
Source
Trials. 2017 03 04; 18(1):100
Publication Type
Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
03-04-2017
Author
Bente Storm Mowatt Haugland
Solfrid Raknes
Aashild Tellefsen Haaland
Gro Janne Wergeland
Jon Fauskanger Bjaastad
Valborg Baste
Joe Himle
Ron Rapee
Asle Hoffart
Author Affiliation
Regional Centre for Child and Youth Mental Health and Child Welfare, Uni Research Health, Pb 7810, 5020, Bergen, Norway. bente.haugland@uni.no.
Source
Trials. 2017 03 04; 18(1):100
Date
03-04-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Adolescent
Adolescent Behavior
Anxiety - diagnosis - psychology - therapy
Child
Child Behavior
Clinical Protocols
Cognitive Therapy - methods
Female
Humans
Male
Norway
Patient care team
Psychiatric Status Rating Scales
Research Design
School Health Services
Surveys and Questionnaires
Time Factors
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
Anxiety disorders are prevalent among adolescents and may have long-lasting negative consequences for the individual, the family and society. Cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) is an effective treatment. However, many anxious youth do not seek treatment. Low-intensity CBT in schools may improve access to evidence-based services. We aim to investigate the efficacy of two CBT youth anxiety programs with different intensities (i.e., number and length of sessions), both group-based and administered as early interventions in a school setting. The objectives of the study are to examine the effects of school-based interventions for youth anxiety and to determine whether a less intensive intervention is non-inferior to a more intensive intervention.
The present study is a randomized controlled trial comparing two CBT interventions to a waitlist control group. A total of 18 schools participate and we aim to recruit 323 adolescents (12-16 years). Youth who score above a cutoff on an anxiety symptom scale will be included in the study. School nurses recruit participants and deliver the interventions, with mental health workers as co-therapists and/or supervisors. Primary outcomes are level of anxiety symptoms and anxiety-related functional impairments. Secondary outcomes are level of depressive symptoms, quality of life and general psychosocial functioning. Non-inferiority between the two active interventions will be declared if a difference of 1.4 or less is found on the anxiety symptom measure post-intervention and a difference of 0.8 on the interference scale. Effects will be analyzed by mixed effect models, applying an intention to treat procedure.
The present study extends previous research by comparing two programs with different intensity. A brief intervention, if effective, could more easily be subject to large-scale implementation in school health services.
ClinicalTrials.gov, NCT02279251 . Registered on 15 October 2014. Retrospectively registered.
Notes
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PubMed ID
28259171 View in PubMed
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[An assessment of the immune status of the children population as a marker of technogenic pollution of the environment].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature290297
Source
Gig Sanit. 2016; 95(12):1129-33
Publication Type
Journal Article
Author
L A Stepanenko
M F Savchenkov
S V Ilina
E V Anganova
E D Savilov
Source
Gig Sanit. 2016; 95(12):1129-33
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Air Pollutants - adverse effects - analysis
B-Lymphocytes - immunology
Child
Environmental Exposure - adverse effects - analysis - prevention & control
Female
Humans
Immunocompetence - drug effects
Male
Monitoring, Immunologic - methods - statistics & numerical data
Population
Receptors, Antigen, T-Cell - analysis
School Health Services - organization & administration - statistics & numerical data
Siberia - epidemiology
T-Lymphocytes - immunology
Abstract
This article describes results of the immunological study of school-aged children residing in cities with different levels of the technogenic air pollution. Children from cities with the highest level of the technogenic pollution had a high number of immature neutrophils (band cells) and eosinophils. The children living in these ecologically unfavorable areas have presented a reduction of T-cell antigen receptor CD3, CD4, CD8, CD20, CD16, CD95. This indicates to that both T-cell and B-cell immunity is suppressed. The decline of the phagocytic function in neutrophils indicates to the suppression of the nonspecific host defense mechanisms also.
PubMed ID
29446280 View in PubMed
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Changes in physical activity and sedentary time in the Finnish Schools on the Move program: a quasi-experimental study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature290447
Source
Scand J Med Sci Sports. 2017 Nov; 27(11):1442-1453
Publication Type
Journal Article
Multicenter Study
Date
Nov-2017
Author
Henna L Haapala
Mirja H Hirvensalo
Janne Kulmala
Harto Hakonen
Anna Kankaanpää
Kaarlo Laine
Lauri Laakso
Tuija H Tammelin
Author Affiliation
LIKES Research Center for Sport and Health Sciences, Jyväskylä, Finland.
Source
Scand J Med Sci Sports. 2017 Nov; 27(11):1442-1453
Date
Nov-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Multicenter Study
Keywords
Actigraphy
Adolescent
Child
Exercise
Female
Finland
Health promotion
Humans
Leisure Activities
Male
Schools
Abstract
The aim of the Finnish Schools on the Move program is to create a more active and pleasant school day through physical activity (PA). In this quasi-experimental design, we compared changes in moderate-to-vigorous-intensity physical activity (MVPA) and sedentary time (ST) during the school day and outside school hours for Grades 1-9 over two academic years in four program schools and two reference schools. Altogether 319 girls and boys aged 7-15 participated in the study between 2010 and 2012. MVPA and ST were measured four times over the 1.5-year follow-up period for seven consecutive days, using a hip-worn ActiGraph accelerometer. Linear growth curve modeling was used to examine the effect of the program on MVPA and ST during follow-up. School day MVPA increased (P = 0.010) and school day ST decreased (P = 0.008) in program primary schools (Grades 1-6) more compared with the reference schools. The effect sizes (Cohen's d) for the difference in change (from the first to the last measurement) were small (d = 0.18 and d = -0.27, respectively). No differences in the changes of leisure-time or whole-day MVPA and ST between the program and reference schools were observed during follow-up. In conclusion, the changes in school day MVPA and ST did not translate into positive effects across the whole day. More effective and longer promotion actions are needed for positive changes in PA and ST, especially in lower secondary schools and for all daily segments.
PubMed ID
27781314 View in PubMed
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Addictive behaviors, social and psychosocial factors, and electronic cigarette use among adolescents: a population-based study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature290960
Source
Public Health. 2018 Feb; 155:129-132
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Feb-2018
Author
M Lindström
M Rosvall
Author Affiliation
Social Medicine and Health Policy, Department of Clinical Sciences in Malmö, Lund University, S-205 02 Malmö, Sweden. Electronic address: martin.lindstrom@med.lu.se.
Source
Public Health. 2018 Feb; 155:129-132
Date
Feb-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adolescent Behavior - psychology
Alcohol Drinking - epidemiology - psychology
Behavior, addictive - psychology
Cigarette Smoking - epidemiology
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Humans
Male
Narcotics
Risk factors
Schools
Sweden - epidemiology
Vaping - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
The aim was to investigate associations between e-cigarette use and social and psychosocial factors and cigarette smoking, alcohol consumption, and narcotics use among adolescents attending 9th grade in primary school and 2nd grade in secondary school.
Cross-sectional study.
The public health survey among adolescents in Scania in 2016 includes pupils in grades 9 and 2. The associations between e-cigarette use and lifestyle, social and psychosocial factors, and trust were investigated with logistic regressions.
In 9th grade, 32% of male pupils and 27% of female pupils had ever used e-cigarettes, and in 2nd grade, 43% of males and 31% of females had ever used e-cigarettes. E-cigarette use was significantly associated with current smoking, snus (a moist powder tobacco product originating in Sweden) use, water pipe use, intensive alcohol consumption, and narcotics and also with psychosocial conditions related to home and parents, peers, and school.
The prevalence of ever e-cigarette use was high among adolescents attending both grades. E-cigarette use was most strongly associated with health-related lifestyles. It was also associated with psychosocial factors such as study difficulties, school stress, problems talking with parents, and generalized trust.
PubMed ID
29353186 View in PubMed
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Classroom relationship qualities and social-cognitive correlates of defending and passive bystanding in school bullying in Sweden: A multilevel analysis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature290991
Source
J Sch Psychol. 2017 Aug; 63:49-62
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Aug-2017
Author
Robert Thornberg
Linda Wänström
Jun Sung Hong
Dorothy L Espelage
Author Affiliation
Linköping University, Sweden. Electronic address: robert.thornberg@liu.se.
Source
J Sch Psychol. 2017 Aug; 63:49-62
Date
Aug-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Bullying
Child
Cognition
Female
Humans
Male
Morals
Multilevel Analysis
Peer Group
Schools
Self Efficacy
Social Behavior
Students - psychology
Sweden
Abstract
Using the social-ecological and social cognitive theories as integrated guiding frameworks, the present study examined whether moral disengagement and defender self-efficacy at the individual level, and moral disengagement, quality of teacher-student relationships and quality of student-student relationships at the classroom level were associated with passive bystanding and defending in bullying situations. Participants were 900 Swedish students from 43 classrooms, ranging in age from 9 to 13years. Multilevel regression analyses revealed that passive reactions by bystanders were associated with greater moral disengagement and less defender self-efficacy. Defending, in turn, was associated with less moral disengagement and greater defender self-efficacy and classroom student-student relationship quality. Furthermore, students who scored high in moral disengagement were even less prone to defend victims when the classroom student-student relationship quality was low, but more prone to act as defenders when the classroom student-student relationship quality was high. In addition, the negative association between defender self-efficacy and passive bystanding was stronger both in classrooms with higher student-student relationship quality and in those with lower class moral disengagement. Implications for prevention are discussed.
PubMed ID
28633938 View in PubMed
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3760 records – page 1 of 376.