Skip header and navigation

Refine By

191 records – page 1 of 20.

[Achieving the optimal functional state in younger schoolchildren by alternating their posture in the classroom]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature38363
Source
Gig Sanit. 1988 Nov;(11):75-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-1988

Adolescent health, school health activities, community contexts, and health surveys in Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature9622
Source
J Adolesc Health. 2003 Oct;33(4):226-30
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2003
Author
Kristina Berg-Kelly
Author Affiliation
Department of Pediatrics, The Queen Silvia Children's Hospital, Göteborg University, Institute for the Health of Women and Children, Göteborg, Sweden. kristina@bob-kelly.se
Source
J Adolesc Health. 2003 Oct;33(4):226-30
Date
Oct-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adolescent Health Services - organization & administration
Alcohol drinking - epidemiology
Community Health Planning
Female
Health Behavior
Health Promotion - organization & administration
Health Surveys
Humans
Male
Primary Prevention - organization & administration
Risk-Taking
School Health Services - organization & administration
Sex Factors
Smoking - epidemiology
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
School health activities have been very important in improving adolescent health in Sweden for almost 200 years. In the 1800s, emphasis was on medical services. Vaccination programs and medical examinations became the key issues. Deterioration of adolescent health in the 1960s changed the objectives of both school education and health services to health promotion. Important members of the community followed suit and involvement of the local community has remained a hallmark, even though the extent and direction varies. The subsequent period was characterized by substantial improvement in adolescent health behavior. The latter years of the 1980s and the 1990s saw deterioration of adolescent health behavior. Less emphasis on health promotion, decentralization of school health responsibility from physicians to administrators, and heavy savings directed toward schools were important mediators. Adolescents were also more engaged in international youth cultures with liberal practices, such as drug use. Community surveys of adolescent health behaviors have proven to be important in mobilizing broad local involvement in adolescent health promotion. The lesson learned is that health promotion has to involve as many community members as possible. Coordinating resources and having unified objectives is cost efficient
Notes
Comment In: J Adolesc Health. 2003 Oct;33(4):213-414519559
PubMed ID
14519563 View in PubMed
Less detail

AIDS and Danish adolescents--knowledge, attitudes, and behaviour relevant to the prevention of HIV-infection.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature8370
Source
Dan Med Bull. 1990 Jun;37(3):275-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1990
Author
A. Krasnik
M. Wangel
Author Affiliation
Institut for Social Medicin, Panum Institutet, Københavns Universitet.
Source
Dan Med Bull. 1990 Jun;37(3):275-9
Date
Jun-1990
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome - etiology - prevention & control - psychology
Adolescent
Adolescent Behavior
Contraceptive Devices, Male - utilization
Cross-Sectional Studies
Denmark
Health Education - organization & administration
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Humans
Questionnaires
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
School Health Services - organization & administration
Sexual Behavior
Abstract
To evaluate the effect of previous AIDS education on AIDS knowledge and sex behaviour among Danish adolescents, a survey was carried out in April-May 1988 amongst 15-16 year-old school children of 9th grade elementary school. Through a cluster-sampling procedure, 45 school classes in nine geographical areas around the country were selected representing various degrees of urbanisation. A questionnaire was handed out and collected by the local school physician during a class session. The 728 pupils responding corresponded to a response rate of 89% of the pupils enlisted and 99% of the pupils present. The results demonstrate that AIDS education has been widely introduced in Danish schools and is well accepted. However, school health services have only rarely been involved. The educational activities seem to have a positive effect on knowledge about HIV-transmission and AIDS, attitudes towards the use of condoms and actual sexual behaviour, although risk-behaviour is still prevalent. The respondents express positive attitudes towards more AIDS education--especially among those with very little or no previous educational experiences.
PubMed ID
2357908 View in PubMed
Less detail

Alcohol, tobacco and cannabis use among Nova Scotia adolescents: implications for prevention and harm reduction.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature208430
Source
CMAJ. 1997 May 15;156(10):1387-93
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-15-1997
Author
C. Poulin
D. Elliott
Author Affiliation
Department of Community Health and Epidemiology, Faculty of Medicine, Dalhousie University, Halifax, NS. cpoulin@tupdean1.med.dal.ca
Source
CMAJ. 1997 May 15;156(10):1387-93
Date
May-15-1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Alcohol Drinking - epidemiology - prevention & control
Female
Health Education - organization & administration
Humans
Male
Marijuana Smoking - epidemiology - prevention & control
Nova Scotia - epidemiology
Prevalence
Regression Analysis
Risk factors
School Health Services - organization & administration
Smoking - epidemiology - prevention & control
Abstract
To characterize adolescent drug use in terms of a risk continuum and to explore the rationale for harm reduction as a potential approach for school-based drug prevention.
Self-reported surveys, in 1991 and 1996, of adolescent students concerning their use of drugs, especially alcohol, tobacco and cannabis, and the harmful consequences of such use.
Nova Scotia.
A total of 3452 (in 1991) and 3790 (in 1996) junior and high school students in randomly selected classes in the public school system.
Prevalence of drug use and patterns of multiple drug use and of alcohol- and drug-related problems; independent risk factors for multiple drug use. The risk continuum for the response to alcohol problems was used as a policy framework.
The prevalence of cigarette smoking and the use of hallucinogens and stimulants was markedly higher in 1996 than in 1991. Over one-fifth (21.9%) of the students reported multiple drug use of alcohol and tobacco and cannabis in the 12 months before the 1996 survey. The 3 main subgroups--nonusers, users of alcohol only and users of multiple drugs--had distinct patterns of use, numbers of problems and risk factors. In all, 27.1% of the students had experienced at least 1 alcohol-related problem and 6% had experienced at least 1 drug-related problem in the 12 months before the 1996 survey.
There is a need for integrated school- and community-based drug prevention programs, with goals, strategies and outcome measures capturing the full spectrum of patterns of use and levels of risk among subgroups of the adolescent student population.
Notes
Comment In: CMAJ. 1997 May 15;156(10):1397-99164397
PubMed ID
9164396 View in PubMed
Less detail

Analyzing the state of community health nursing: advancing from deficit to strengths-based practice using appreciative inquiry.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature159544
Source
ANS Adv Nurs Sci. 2008 Jan-Mar;31(1):28-41
Publication Type
Article
Author
Candace Lind
Dawn Smith
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Nursing, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta, Canada T2N 1N4. cylind@ucalgary.ca
Source
ANS Adv Nurs Sci. 2008 Jan-Mar;31(1):28-41
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Aged
American Native Continental Ancestry Group
British Columbia
Canada
Community Health Nursing - education - methods - organization & administration
Community-Based Participatory Research
Health Policy
Health Promotion - methods - organization & administration
Health Services, Indigenous - organization & administration
Humans
Mental Health Services - organization & administration
Philosophy, Nursing
School Health Services - organization & administration
Social Justice
Abstract
In this article we critically analyze the disconnect between much of the contemporary discourse and practice in Canadian community health nursing (CHN) that has contributed to the slow progress of strengths-based, health-promoting nursing practice. Appreciative inquiry philosophy and methods are introduced as a bridge to traverse this disciplinary gap. Two exemplars show how appreciative, strengths-based CHN research and action can move policies and programs toward more socially just practices congruent with CHN values. Exciting potential for nursing knowledge may arise from incorporating more strengths-based approaches into practice, education, policy, and research.
PubMed ID
20531267 View in PubMed
Less detail

[An assessment of the immune status of the children population as a marker of technogenic pollution of the environment].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature290297
Source
Gig Sanit. 2016; 95(12):1129-33
Publication Type
Journal Article
Author
L A Stepanenko
M F Savchenkov
S V Ilina
E V Anganova
E D Savilov
Source
Gig Sanit. 2016; 95(12):1129-33
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Air Pollutants - adverse effects - analysis
B-Lymphocytes - immunology
Child
Environmental Exposure - adverse effects - analysis - prevention & control
Female
Humans
Immunocompetence - drug effects
Male
Monitoring, Immunologic - methods - statistics & numerical data
Population
Receptors, Antigen, T-Cell - analysis
School Health Services - organization & administration - statistics & numerical data
Siberia - epidemiology
T-Lymphocytes - immunology
Abstract
This article describes results of the immunological study of school-aged children residing in cities with different levels of the technogenic air pollution. Children from cities with the highest level of the technogenic pollution had a high number of immature neutrophils (band cells) and eosinophils. The children living in these ecologically unfavorable areas have presented a reduction of T-cell antigen receptor CD3, CD4, CD8, CD20, CD16, CD95. This indicates to that both T-cell and B-cell immunity is suppressed. The decline of the phagocytic function in neutrophils indicates to the suppression of the nonspecific host defense mechanisms also.
PubMed ID
29446280 View in PubMed
Less detail

An evaluation of a Canadian peer-driven injury prevention programme for high-risk adolescents.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature212746
Source
J Adv Nurs. 1996 Feb;23(2):329-37
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-1996
Author
L. Tenn
M E Dewis
Author Affiliation
School of Nursing, Institute of Health Promotion Research, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada.
Source
J Adv Nurs. 1996 Feb;23(2):329-37
Date
Feb-1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adolescent Health Services - organization & administration
Canada - epidemiology
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Health Behavior
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Humans
Internal-External Control
Male
Peer Group
Program Evaluation
Risk-Taking
School Health Services - organization & administration
Wounds and injuries - epidemiology - prevention & control
Abstract
The mortality and morbidity resulting from serious trauma in adolescence, particularly head and spinal cord injury, constitutes a health problem of major proportions. Although many community-based prevention programmes have been reported in this last decade, few of these describe an evaluation component. In this study, a school-based prevention programme was developed by a peer group and presented by them to high-risk adolescents. The study aimed to test the efficacy of this intervention compared to the delivery of a prevention presentation to a similar group by a health care professional and compared to a control group. Measures of health locus of control, self-efficacy and behavioural intent were supplemented by open-ended items related to risk-taking behaviour change. At post-test and at 4-month follow-up, there was little evidence in the quantitative measures to support the effectiveness of the intervention for reducing injury risk factors. More encouraging findings were seen in the qualitative data. Explanations for why the intervention did not result in the expected outcomes are offered.
PubMed ID
8708247 View in PubMed
Less detail

An outcome-focused, community-based health support program.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature218698
Source
J Nurs Adm. 1994 Mar;24(3):48-54
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-1994
Author
J. Bard
F C Jimenez
R D Tornack
Author Affiliation
British Columbia Rehabilitation Society, Victoria, Canada.
Source
J Nurs Adm. 1994 Mar;24(3):48-54
Date
Mar-1994
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
British Columbia
Child
Child Health Services - organization & administration - statistics & numerical data
Community Health Nursing - organization & administration - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Program Evaluation - statistics & numerical data
School Health Services - organization & administration - statistics & numerical data
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
The authors discuss an outcome-based management framework for evaluating a community-based program for children requiring health support. Application of the framework is delineated both generically and specifically. Examples illustrate the process of global outcomes analysis and identification of critical outcomes, activities, and strategies.
PubMed ID
8133326 View in PubMed
Less detail

191 records – page 1 of 20.