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Admission to university engineering programs in Sweden: a multipurpose approach.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature178454
Source
Psychol Rep. 2004 Jun;94(3 Pt 2):1125-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2004
Author
Simon Wolming
Per-Erik Lyrén
Author Affiliation
Department of Educational Measurement, Umeå University, Sweden. Simon.Wolming@edmeas.umu.se
Source
Psychol Rep. 2004 Jun;94(3 Pt 2):1125-6
Date
Jun-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aptitude Tests - statistics & numerical data
Educational Status
Engineering - education
Humans
Likelihood Functions
School Admission Criteria - statistics & numerical data
Sweden
Universities
Abstract
This brief article provides a description of some new ideas about admission of university engineering students in Sweden. The current system of admission is based on upper-secondary school grades and the Swedish Scholastic Assessment Test. These measures are used for admission to all higher education. For many reasons, ideas for a new admission model have been proposed. This model includes a sector-oriented admission test, which the universities are supposed to use for different purposes, such as selection, eligibility, diagnostics, and recruitment.
Notes
Comment On: Psychol Rep. 2003 Oct;93(2):399-40914650662
PubMed ID
15362381 View in PubMed
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An overview of the medical school admission process and use of applicant data in decision making: what has changed since the 1980s?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature115265
Source
Acad Med. 2013 May;88(5):672-81
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2013
Author
Alicia Monroe
Erin Quinn
Wayne Samuelson
Dana M Dunleavy
Keith W Dowd
Author Affiliation
Educational Affairs, University of South Florida Health Morsani College of Medicine, Tampa, Florida, USA.
Source
Acad Med. 2013 May;88(5):672-81
Date
May-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
College Admission Test
Correspondence as Topic
Curriculum - trends
Decision Making
Education, Medical, Undergraduate - methods - trends
Humans
Interviews as Topic - methods - utilization
School Admission Criteria - statistics & numerical data - trends
Schools, Medical - legislation & jurisprudence - organization & administration - statistics & numerical data - trends
United States
Abstract
To investigate current medical school admission processes and whether they differ from those in 1986 when they were last reviewed by the Association of American Medical Colleges (AAMC).
In spring 2008, admission deans from all MD-granting U.S. and Canadian medical schools using the Medical College Admission Test (MCAT) were invited to complete an online survey that asked participants to describe their institution's admission process and to report the use and rate the importance of applicant data in making decisions at each stage.
The 120 responding admission officers reported using a variety of data to make decisions. Most indicated using interviews to assess applicants' personal characteristics. Compared with 1986, there was an increase in the emphasis placed on academic data during pre-interview screening. While GPA data were among the most important data in decision making at all stages in 1986, data use and importance varied by the stage of the process in 2008: MCAT scores and undergraduate GPAs were rated as the most important data for deciding whom to invite to submit secondary applications and interview, whereas interview recommendations and letters of recommendation were rated as the most important data in deciding whom to accept.
This study underscores the complexity of the medical school admission process and suggests increased use of a holistic approach that considers the whole applicant when making admission decisions. Findings will inform AAMC initiatives focused on transforming admission processes.
PubMed ID
23524917 View in PubMed
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Assessment of applicants to the veterinary curriculum using a multiple mini-interview method.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature149538
Source
J Vet Med Educ. 2009;36(2):166-73
Publication Type
Article
Date
2009
Author
Kent Hecker
Tyrone Donnon
Carmen Fuentealba
David Hall
Oscar Illanes
Doug W Morck
Christoph Muelling
Author Affiliation
Department of Veterinary Clinical and Diagnostic Science, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, University of Calgary, Calgary, Canada. kghecker@ucalgary.ca
Source
J Vet Med Educ. 2009;36(2):166-73
Date
2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alberta
Communication
Curriculum
Decision Making
Education, Veterinary
Empathy
Factor Analysis, Statistical
Humans
Interviews as Topic - methods - standards
Psychometrics
School Admission Criteria - statistics & numerical data
Schools, Veterinary
Students, Health Occupations - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
This study describes the development, implementation, and psychometric assessment of the multiple mini-interview (MMI) for the inaugural class of veterinary medicine applicants at the University of Calgary Faculty of Veterinary Medicine (UCVM). The MMI is a series of approximately five to 12 10-minute interviews that consist of situational events. Applicants are given a scenario and asked to work through an issue or behavioral-type questions that are meant to assess one attribute (e.g., empathy) at a time. This structure allows for multiple assessments of the applicants by trained interviewers on the same questions. MMI scenario development was based on a review of the noncognitive attributes currently assessed by the 31 veterinary schools across Canada and the United States and the goals and objectives of UCVM. The noncognitive attributes of applicants (N=110) were assessed at five stations, by two interviewers within each station, on three items using a standardized rating form on an anchored 1-5 scale. The method was determined to be reliable (G-coefficient=0.88) and demonstrated evidence of validity. The MMI score did not correlate with grade-point average (r=0.12, p=0.22). While neither the applicants nor interviewers had participated in an MMI format before, both groups reported the process to be acceptable in a post-interview questionnaire. This analysis provides preliminary evidence of the reliability, validity, and acceptability of the MMI in assessing the noncognitive attributes of applicants for veterinary medical school admissions.
PubMed ID
19625664 View in PubMed
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Challenge for credit in Canadian university nursing programs.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature221904
Source
Can J Nurs Res. 1993;25(4):17-25
Publication Type
Article
Date
1993
Author
M A Andrusyszyn
Author Affiliation
Department of Nursing and Health Studies, Brandon University, Manitoba.
Source
Can J Nurs Res. 1993;25(4):17-25
Date
1993
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Education, Nursing, Baccalaureate
Education, Professional, Retraining
Humans
Licensure, Nursing
Nursing Education Research
Professional Competence
Questionnaires
School Admission Criteria - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
This study describes the opportunities for advanced placement available to registered nurses who are entering Canadian university baccalaureate nursing programs, and the criteria used to decide whether courses may be challenged for credit. Of the 28 Canadian university schools of nursing, 25 (89%) agreed to participate in the study. Telephone interviews were conducted with representatives from each of the schools. All provided access to baccalaureate education for registered nurses and some form of recognition for their diploma. Formal or informal challenge opportunities were available in 48% of the schools. There was no consistency in criteria for challenge among the schools. Although respondents reported that challenge opportunities had merit, they questioned whether challenge was useful for measuring the advanced critical thinking skills required of baccalaureate nurses. Further research in this area is warranted.
PubMed ID
10603804 View in PubMed
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Changes in services for students with learning disabilities in U.S. and Canadian medical schools, 1991 to 1997.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature203415
Source
Acad Med. 1998 Dec;73(12):1290-3
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1998
Author
H C Faigel
Author Affiliation
Tufts University School of Medicine, Boston, Massachusetts, USA.
Source
Acad Med. 1998 Dec;73(12):1290-3
Date
Dec-1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Learning Disorders - rehabilitation
Questionnaires
Rehabilitation - legislation & jurisprudence - standards - statistics & numerical data
Retrospective Studies
School Admission Criteria - statistics & numerical data
Schools, Medical - standards
Student Health Services - legislation & jurisprudence - standards - statistics & numerical data
Students, Medical - statistics & numerical data
United States
Abstract
To determine the changes between 1991 and 1997 in the admission policies of and services offered by U.S. and Canadian medical schools to students with learning disabilities.
Between June 1 and August 31, 1997, the author surveyed 144 medical schools in the United States and Canada regarding their services and programs for learning-disabled medical students. The questionnaire was the same one as used in a 1991 study.
Of the medical schools contacted, 106 responded (one Canadian school sent a letter but did not complete the questionnaire). Ninety-four of 96 U.S. schools and seven of the remaining nine Canadian schools said that they accept students with learning disabilities. All of the respondents that accept such students claimed to make some academic accommodations. Most indicated that they would administer non-standard (e.g., untimed) licensing examinations, and many reported that their affiliated postgraduate medical training programs would also make appropriate accommodations for students with learning disabilities.
When compared with the results from the 1991 survey, the new data suggest that medical schools have improved their services for learning-disabled students in response to the Americans with Disabilities Act.
PubMed ID
9883206 View in PubMed
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Emotional intelligence of nursing applicants and factors related to it: A cross-sectional study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature307531
Source
Nurse Educ Today. 2020 Feb; 85:104271
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Feb-2020
Author
Kirsi Talman
Maija Hupli
Robert Rankin
Janne Engblom
Elina Haavisto
Author Affiliation
Department of Nursing Science, 20014, University of Turku, Finland. Electronic address: kimata@utu.fi.
Source
Nurse Educ Today. 2020 Feb; 85:104271
Date
Feb-2020
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Cross-Sectional Studies
Emotional Intelligence - classification
Female
Finland
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Psychometrics - instrumentation - methods
School Admission Criteria - statistics & numerical data
Schools, Nursing - organization & administration - statistics & numerical data
Students - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Surveys and Questionnaires
Universities - organization & administration - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
Emotions influence patient care decisions and professional relationships. Emotional intelligence has been proven to predict nursing students' success in clinical practice and academic performance. Scarce amount of studies have assessed the emotional intelligence in the nursing student selection context.
To assess the emotional intelligence of applicants to undergraduate (bachelor level) nursing education and the factors related to it.
Cross-sectional quantitative study.
The data collection took place in four Universities of Applied Sciences in October 2016.
Participants were nursing applicants (N = 529) who took part in the entrance exams of the four Universities. Overall, 430 applicants (response rate 81%, 75 males) gave permission to access their results for the study's purposes.
The Rankein Scale measure of emotional intelligence was used. All of the nursing applicants undertook the same electronic entrance exam in supervised computer classrooms. Statistical analysis included the use of two independent samples tests to compare differences in emotional intelligence scores and ANCOVA models to investigate whether background variables explained the observed differences.
In this study, nursing applicants' level of emotional intelligence was found to be average (on a scale of below average, average, above average). However, total scores ranged between 102 and 160 (of 160). Approximately 4% of the applicants scored below the minimum score (
PubMed ID
31874418 View in PubMed
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Have personal statements become impersonal? An evaluation of personal statements in anesthesiology residency applications.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature142003
Source
J Clin Anesth. 2010 Aug;22(5):346-51
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2010
Author
Bryan A Max
Brian Gelfand
Meredith R Brooks
Rena Beckerly
Scott Segal
Author Affiliation
Department of Anesthesiology, Perioperative and Pain Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, MA 02115, USA. bryan.max@childrens.harvard.edu
Source
J Clin Anesth. 2010 Aug;22(5):346-51
Date
Aug-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Anesthesiology - education
Canada
Data Collection
Female
Humans
Internet
Internship and Residency - statistics & numerical data
Male
Observer Variation
School Admission Criteria - statistics & numerical data
Sex Factors
United States
Abstract
To evaluate personal statements submitted to a major academic anesthesiology program to determine the prevalence of common features and overall subjective quality, and to survey anesthesiology program directors as to how they utilized these statements during the resident selection process.
Structured analysis of de-identified personal statements and Internet-based survey of program directors.
Large academic anesthesiology training program.
670 applicant personal statements and academic anesthesiology program directors.
Prevalence of 13 specific essay features and 8 quality ratings were calculated for the essays and correlated with other aspects of the residency application, as abstracted from the Electronic Residency Application Service (ERAS) files. A 6-question survey regarding use of personal statements was collected from program directors.
70 of 131 program directors queried responded to our survey. Interest in physiology and pharmacology, enjoyment of a hands-on specialty, and desire to comfort anxious patients were each mentioned in more than half of the essays. Candidates invited for an interview had essays that received higher quality ratings than essays of those not invited (P = 0.02 to P
Notes
Comment In: J Clin Anesth. 2012 Feb;24(1):7522284323
PubMed ID
20650381 View in PubMed
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How many neurosurgeons do we want to educate in Europe annually? The Danish proposal.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature210006
Source
Acta Neurochir Suppl. 1997;69:40-2
Publication Type
Article
Date
1997
Author
F. Gjerris
F F Madsen
Author Affiliation
University Clinic of Neurosurgery, Rigshospitalet, University of Copenhagen, Denmark.
Source
Acta Neurochir Suppl. 1997;69:40-2
Date
1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Cross-Cultural Comparison
Denmark
Forecasting
Health planning - trends
Health Planning Guidelines
Health Services Needs and Demand - trends
Humans
Internship and Residency - manpower
Medical Staff, Hospital - statistics & numerical data
Middle Aged
Neurosurgery - education
Retirement - statistics & numerical data
School Admission Criteria - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
The neurosurgical population consists of professors, consultants, specialised senior registrars, and doctors in training (senior registrars, trainees and young doctors to be educated as neurosurgeons). Knowing number and size of the neurosurgical departments in each European country, the number of staff members, the politics of retirement (age, educational level) and the age of every neurosurgeon it is possible to calculate the exact number of trainees needed per year to maintain a state of balance in every single European country. With Denmark as a model we based our assessments partly on a simple calculation model of the exact annual number of neurosurgical trainees or senior registrars and partly used an actuary flow model for calculation. In Denmark with 5 neurosurgical departments, 5.2 mill. population and a retirement age of 70, we have an average of 1-2 newcomers per year and maintain a bulk of 10 senior registrars in education. Thus there will be a balance between intake of newcomers and retirement, of course with some unknown factors as unforeseen dismissal or resignation, death rate among neurosurgeons and transfer to private practice.
PubMed ID
9253438 View in PubMed
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The medical school applicant pool from Alaska: implications for the development of medical education in the state.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature146812
Source
Alaska Med. 2009 Sep;51:7-9, 44-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2009
Author
Dennis Paul Valenzeno
Julie Sicilia
Author Affiliation
Alaska WWAMI Biomedical Program University of Alaska Anchorage, Anchorage, AK 99508-4614, USA.
Source
Alaska Med. 2009 Sep;51:7-9, 44-6
Date
Sep-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alaska
Career Choice
Education, Medical - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Medically underserved area
Personnel Selection - statistics & numerical data
Physicians - supply & distribution
School Admission Criteria - statistics & numerical data - trends
Schools, Medical - statistics & numerical data - trends
Students, Medical - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
Several recent physician workforce reports in Alaska have called for a rapid increase in the number of state-supported medical school positions to between 30 and 50 new students per year, preferably through WWAMI - Alaska's Medical School. Here we compare applicant and matriculant data for Alaska WWAMI and for Alaskans applying to all U.S. allopathic medical schools to national applicant and matriculant trends gathered from databases of the Association of American Medical Colleges. The assessment demonstrates that 1) changes in the number of Alaska WWAMI applicants parallels changes in the number of Alaskans applying to all U.S. medical schools, but these do not track changes in the national applicant pool, 2) historical records suggest that a fundamental change is needed to provide an applicant pool to support a class size of 50 within the next decade, 3) smaller states with independent, four-year medical schools generate more medical school applicants per capita than Alaska.
PubMed ID
19998707 View in PubMed
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16 records – page 1 of 2.