Skip header and navigation

Refine By

14 records – page 1 of 2.

A 4-fold risk of metabolic syndrome in patients with schizophrenia: the Northern Finland 1966 Birth Cohort study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature49604
Source
J Clin Psychiatry. 2005 May;66(5):559-63
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2005
Author
Kaisa M Saari
Sari M Lindeman
Kaisa M Viilo
Matti K Isohanni
Marjo-Riitta Järvelin
Liisa H Laurén
Markku J Savolainen
Hannu J Koponen
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychiatry, University of Oulu, PO Box 5000, 90014 Oulu, Finland. kaisa.saari@oulu.fi
Source
J Clin Psychiatry. 2005 May;66(5):559-63
Date
May-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Antipsychotic Agents - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Cohort Studies
Comorbidity
Diet Therapy
Exercise
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Logistic Models
Male
Metabolic Syndrome X - epidemiology - prevention & control - therapy
Prevalence
Psychiatric Status Rating Scales
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Schizophrenia - diagnosis - drug therapy - epidemiology
Weight Loss
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: Schizophrenia is associated with a shortened life expectancy and increased somatic comorbidity with, e.g., cardiovascular disorders. One major risk factor for these disorders is the metabolic syndrome, which has been reported to have a higher frequency in schizophrenic patients. Our objective was to study the prevalence of metabolic syndrome in a population-based birth cohort. METHOD: The study sample consisted of 5613 members of the Northern Finland 1966 Birth Cohort who participated in the field study from 1997 to 1998. Subjects were divided into 4 diagnostic categories (DSM-III-R): (1) schizophrenia (N = 31), (2) other functional psychoses (N = 22), (3) nonpsychotic disorders (N = 105), and (4) no psychiatric hospital treatment (N = 5455, comparison group). Subjects were assessed for the presence of metabolic syndrome according to the criteria of the National Cholesterol Education Program. RESULTS: The prevalence of metabolic syndrome was higher in subjects with schizophrenia compared with the comparison group (19% vs. 6%, p = .010). The prevalence of metabolic syndrome in subjects with other psychoses was 5%. After controlling for sex, the results of logistic regression analysis showed that the risk of metabolic syndrome in schizophrenia was 3.7 (95% CI = 1.5 to 9.0). CONCLUSIONS: The high prevalence of metabolic syndrome in schizophrenia even at such a relatively young age underscores the need to select antipsychotic medications with no or little capability to induce metabolic side effects. Also, developing comprehensive efforts directed at controlling weight and diet and improving physical activity are needed.
PubMed ID
15889940 View in PubMed
Less detail

Characteristics and predictors of long-term institutionalization in patients with schizophrenia.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature135676
Source
Schizophr Res. 2011 Sep;131(1-3):120-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2011
Author
Peter Uggerby
René Ernst Nielsen
Christoph U Correll
Jimmi Nielsen
Author Affiliation
Unit for Psychiatric Research, Aalborg Psychiatric Hospital, Aarhus University Hospital, Mølleparkvej 10, PO Box 210, DK-9100 Aalborg, Denmark. peug@rn.dk
Source
Schizophr Res. 2011 Sep;131(1-3):120-6
Date
Sep-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Antipsychotic Agents - therapeutic use
Clozapine - therapeutic use
Cohort Studies
Denmark - epidemiology
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 - epidemiology
Educational Status
Female
Humans
Institutionalization - methods - statistics & numerical data
International Classification of Diseases
Logistic Models
Male
Middle Aged
Predictive value of tests
Retrospective Studies
Risk factors
Schizophrenia - diagnosis - drug therapy - epidemiology - physiopathology
Abstract
Patients with schizophrenia requiring long-term institutionalization represent those with the worst outcome, leading to personal costs for patients and relatives and constituting a large economical burden for society.
To identify characteristics and predictors of outcome of institutionalized patients with schizophrenia.
One-year follow-up cohort study, utilizing the Danish national registers, of all institutionalized and non-institutionalized patients with schizophrenia in Denmark with an ICD-10 lifetime diagnosis of schizophrenia (F20.0-F20.9) since 1969 and alive at the index date of January 1st 2006 (total number 22,395).
Compared with non-institutionalized patients, institutionalized patients (n=2188; 9.8%) had earlier onset of schizophrenia and lower scholastic achievements, were more often diagnosed with a hebephrenic subtype (odds ratio (OR), 2.34; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.95-2.80; p
PubMed ID
21458239 View in PubMed
Less detail

Comparisons of psychotropic drug prescribing patterns in acute psychiatric wards across Europe.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature9540
Source
Eur J Clin Pharmacol. 2004 Mar;60(1):29-35
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2004
Author
Len Bowers
Patrick Callaghan
Nicola Clark
Catharine Evers
Author Affiliation
Department of Mental Health and Learning Disability, City University London, Philpot Street, London E1 2EA, UK. L.Bowers@city.ac.uk
Source
Eur J Clin Pharmacol. 2004 Mar;60(1):29-35
Date
Mar-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Benzodiazepines - therapeutic use
Biperiden - therapeutic use
Chlorpromazine - therapeutic use
Clozapine - therapeutic use
Comparative Study
Cyclohexanols - therapeutic use
Diazepam - therapeutic use
Drug Administration Schedule
Drug Therapy, Combination
Drug Utilization Review - methods
Europe
Female
Humans
Male
Mood Disorders - diagnosis - drug therapy - epidemiology
Pharmacoepidemiology - methods - statistics & numerical data
Physician's Practice Patterns - statistics & numerical data
Prescriptions, Drug - statistics & numerical data
Psychiatric Department, Hospital - statistics & numerical data
Psychotropic Drugs - therapeutic use
Schizophrenia - diagnosis - drug therapy - epidemiology
Time Factors
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To compare prescribed daily doses (PDDs) of psychotropic drugs in several European centres. METHOD: A one-day census of psychotropic drug prescriptions to 613 patients in 39 acute psychiatric wards in ten countries. RESULTS: Patients in Spain were on most drugs; patients in Germany were on the fewest. Chlorpromazine equivalents in Denmark, England, Germany and Spain were at high levels as were diazepam equivalents in Belgium, Finland, The Netherlands and Norway. Newer anti-psychotics were used in the majority of centres, although older anti-psychotics were used commonly in three centres. CONCLUSION: The high doses of psychotropic drugs patients receive in some centres may be having little additional therapeutic effect and could increase their risk of side effects. The use of older anti-psychotics in some centres may be causing side effects that could be reduced by using newer anti-psychotics.
PubMed ID
14747883 View in PubMed
Less detail

Determinants of poor dental care in patients with schizophrenia: a historical, prospective database study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature142565
Source
J Clin Psychiatry. 2011 Feb;72(2):140-3
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2011
Author
Jimmi Nielsen
Povl Munk-Jørgensen
Søren Skadhede
Christoph U Correll
Author Affiliation
Unit for Psychiatric Research, Aalborg Psychiatric Hospital, Aarhus University Hospital, Mølleparkvej 10, PO Box 210, DK-9100 Aalborg, Denmark. jin@rn.dk
Source
J Clin Psychiatry. 2011 Feb;72(2):140-3
Date
Feb-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Antipsychotic Agents - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Cholinergic Antagonists - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Clozapine - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Denmark
Dental Care - utilization
Dental Health Surveys
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Patient Compliance - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Prospective Studies
Risk factors
Schizophrenia - diagnosis - drug therapy - epidemiology
Schizophrenic Psychology
Utilization Review - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
Oral health status is poor and a disregarded health issue among patients with schizophrenia that is associated with the risk for additional social stigmatization and potentially fatal infections.
A historical, prospective database study of dental visits, utilizing the Danish National Patient Registry, of 21,417 patients with ICD-10-diagnosed schizophrenia in the year 2006 and of 18,892 patients for the 3-year period of 2004-2006 was conducted. Multiple logistic regression analyses were used to identify risk factors for lack of dental care.
Only 43% of patients with schizophrenia (9,263/21,417)--compared to an annual dental visit rate of 68% in the general adult Danish population (2,567,634/3,790,446)-visited the dentist within 12 months in 2006 (OR = 2.8; 95% CI, 2.7-2.9; P 50 years were associated with a lower risk for inappropriate dental care.
Patients with schizophrenia visit dentists much less frequently than the general population in the same country. Health professionals should pay more attention to the dental health care of patients with schizophrenia, actively encourage patients to regularly visit the dentist, and establish a formal collaboration with dentists to improve the dental health aspects of this disadvantaged patient group.
PubMed ID
20584518 View in PubMed
Less detail

Determining rates of hepatitis C in a clozapine treated cohort.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature142375
Source
Schizophr Res. 2010 Dec;124(1-3):86-90
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2010
Author
Sanjeev Sockalingam
Chekkera Shammi
Valerie Powell
Lucy Barker
Gary Remington
Author Affiliation
Psychiatry, Health and Disease Division, University Health Network, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. sanjeev.sockalingam@uhn.on.ca
Source
Schizophr Res. 2010 Dec;124(1-3):86-90
Date
Dec-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Administration, Intranasal
Adult
Alcoholism
Antipsychotic Agents - therapeutic use
Canada - epidemiology
Clozapine - therapeutic use
Cocaine-Related Disorders - epidemiology
Cohort Studies
Female
Hepacivirus - genetics - isolation & purification - pathogenicity
Hepatitis C - epidemiology - virology
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Prevalence
Psychotic Disorders - diagnosis - drug therapy - epidemiology
Questionnaires
Risk factors
Risk-Taking
Schizophrenia - diagnosis - drug therapy - epidemiology
Substance Abuse, Intravenous - epidemiology
Abstract
To determine the prevalence rates of hepatitis C in patients with schizophrenia and schizoaffective disorder being treated with clozapine.
Clozapine-treated outpatients and inpatients were recruited from the Centre for Addiction and Mental Health Schizophrenia Program in Toronto, Canada. All subjects had liver function tests, and positive HCV status was defined as a positive qualitative HCV RNA assay. Subjects completed a self-report questionnaire assessing HCV risk factors, past history of liver disease, previous diagnosis of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), past hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection and current alcohol use.
110 subjects participated in the study and the HCV prevalence rate (antibody and viremia-positive) was 2.7%, compared to a 0.8% prevalence rate in Canada. All study subjects had established housing, none reported a history of HIV, and only one patient had a history of HBV infection. A total of 9% drank two or more drinks on a typical day drinking and 7% endorsed having six or more drinks on one occasion at least monthly. Two of 3HCV-viremia positive subjects had HCV risk factors, specifically intravenous drug use and intranasal cocaine use. There was no difference between HCV infected and HCV negative subjects on liver function tests.
Our study demonstrates elevated rates of HCV in clozapine-treated patients compared to the general population in Canada and are congruent with reports from United States centres. Our study highlights the importance of homelessness and patterns of high-risk behaviour when interpreting HCV prevalence rates in this sub-population of patients and should be explored in future studies.
PubMed ID
20605572 View in PubMed
Less detail

Early Predictors of Ten-Year Course in First-Episode Psychosis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature279449
Source
Psychiatr Serv. 2016 Apr 01;67(4):438-43
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-01-2016
Author
Svein Friis
Ingrid Melle
Jan Olav Johannessen
Jan Ivar Røssberg
Helene Eidsmo Barder
Julie Horgen Evensen
Ulrik Haahr
Wenche Ten Velden Hegelstad
Inge Joa
Johannes Langeveld
Tor Ketil Larsen
Stein Opjordsmoen
Bjørn Rishovd Rund
Erik Simonsen
Per Wiggen Vaglum
Thomas H McGlashan
Source
Psychiatr Serv. 2016 Apr 01;67(4):438-43
Date
Apr-01-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Denmark - epidemiology
Disease Progression
Female
Humans
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Middle Aged
Norway - epidemiology
Outcome Assessment (Health Care) - statistics & numerical data
Prognosis
Psychotic Disorders - diagnosis - drug therapy - epidemiology
Remission Induction
Schizophrenia - diagnosis - drug therapy - epidemiology
Social Skills
Time Factors
Abstract
Identifying patients at risk of poor outcome at an early stage of illness can aid in treatment planning. This study sought to create a best-fit statistical model of known baseline and early-course risk factors to predict time in psychosis during a ten-year follow-up period after a first psychotic episode.
Between 1997 and 2000, 301 patients with DSM-IV nonorganic, nonaffective first-episode psychosis were recruited consecutively from catchment area-based sectors in Norway and Denmark. Specialized mental health personnel evaluated patients at baseline, three months, and one, two, five, and ten years (N=186 at ten years). Time in psychosis was defined as time with scores =4 on any of the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale items P1, P3, P5, P6, and G9. Evaluations were retrospective, based on clinical interviews and all available clinical information. During the first two years, patients were also evaluated by their clinicians at least biweekly. Baseline and early-course predictors of long-term course were identified with linear mixed-model analyses.
Four variables provided significant, additive predictions of longer time in psychosis during the ten-year follow-up: deterioration in premorbid social functioning, duration of untreated psychosis (DUP) of =26 weeks, core schizophrenia spectrum disorder, and no remission within three months.
First-episode psychosis patients should be followed carefully after the start of treatment. If symptoms do not remit within three months with adequate treatment, there is a considerable risk of a poor long-term outcome, particularly for patients with a deterioration in premorbid social functioning, a DUP of at least half a year, and a diagnosis within the core schizophrenia spectrum.
PubMed ID
26567932 View in PubMed
Less detail

Improving reliability of the assessment of the life course of schizophrenia.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature139371
Source
Can J Psychiatry. 2010 Nov;55(11):729-35
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2010
Author
Angus H Thompson
Stephen C Newman
Helene Orn
Roger C Bland
Author Affiliation
Institute of Health Economics, Edmonton, Alberta. gthompson@ihe.ca
Source
Can J Psychiatry. 2010 Nov;55(11):729-35
Date
Nov-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age of Onset
Alberta
Antipsychotic Agents - therapeutic use
Cohort Studies
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Hospitalization - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Models, Theoretical
Schizophrenia - diagnosis - drug therapy - epidemiology
Schizophrenic Psychology
Treatment Outcome
Young Adult
Abstract
Life course studies of schizophrenia that have used a 3-phase model (onset, course, and outcome) have had their use restricted owing to differences in definition and methodology. The purpose of this investigation was to describe life course data in mathematical terms and to compare the results with the findings from other life course studies.
The study population was comprised of 128 of 137 people who were first admitted for schizophrenia to 1 of the 2 mental hospitals in Alberta in 1963 and followed until 1997 or death. Patient evaluations were based on retrospective and contemporaneous information collected from the patients and hospital files, treatment records, and family members. Mathematically derived ratings were formulated for course, outcome, and onset (pre-admission years). The distribution of the resulting 8 life course types was compared with profiles drawn from other such studies reported in the literature.
The use of mathematical descriptions of onset, course, and outcome produced profiles that did not closely match the results of other investigations, largely owing to inconsistency across studies. Further, the present approach to outcome measurement produced results that were less favourable than those found in other studies.
Studies on the life course of schizophrenia could be made more comparable by specifying mathematically expressed operational definitions of onset, course, and outcome. Nonetheless, the use of the term outcome can be questioned as it implies an assessment at a specific time rather than providing a summary statement of the quality of a life.
PubMed ID
21070701 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Nosologic comorbidity in addictive medicine].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature154687
Source
Zh Nevrol Psikhiatr Im S S Korsakova. 2007;Suppl 1:21-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
2007
Author
O F Eryshev
Source
Zh Nevrol Psikhiatr Im S S Korsakova. 2007;Suppl 1:21-5
Date
2007
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alcoholism - diagnosis - drug therapy - epidemiology
Antidepressive Agents - therapeutic use
Antipsychotic Agents - therapeutic use
Comorbidity - trends
Drug Therapy, Combination
Humans
Prognosis
Russia - epidemiology
Schizophrenia - diagnosis - drug therapy - epidemiology
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
The results of the study of 158 patients with alcohol dependence, comorbid in 85 cases with slow progressive schizophrenia and in 75 cases with affective disorders (cyclothymia), are viewed in the aspect of a theory of comorbidity. The psychopathological peculiarities of each nosologic form are singled out. The author stresses that establishing of the comorbid pathology is important for the right therapeutic strategy. The effectiveness of using the combinations of neuroleptics, either typical or atypical, and antidepressants (tricyclic, SSRIs etc) is revealed.
PubMed ID
18924466 View in PubMed
Less detail

Recovery from schizophrenic psychoses within the northern Finland 1966 Birth Cohort.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature70750
Source
J Clin Psychiatry. 2005 Mar;66(3):375-83
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2005
Author
Erika Lauronen
Johanna Koskinen
Juha Veijola
Jouko Miettunen
Peter B Jones
Wayne S Fenton
Matti Isohanni
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychiatry, University of Oulu, P.O. Box 5000, FIN-90014, Oulu, Finland. llaurone@paju.oulu.fi
Source
J Clin Psychiatry. 2005 Mar;66(3):375-83
Date
Mar-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Antipsychotic Agents - therapeutic use
Cohort Studies
Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Health Surveys
Hospitalization - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Male
Outcome Assessment (Health Care) - statistics & numerical data
Prognosis
Psychiatric Status Rating Scales - statistics & numerical data
Registries - statistics & numerical data
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Schizophrenia - diagnosis - drug therapy - epidemiology
Schizophrenic Psychology
Severity of Illness Index
Social Adjustment
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Because of widely disparate findings from follow-up studies, the likelihood of recovery from schizophrenia remains controversial. We report the extent of recovery from schizophrenia in a population-based cohort. METHOD: Subjects with psychotic disorders were recruited from the Northern Finland 1966 Birth Cohort. Of the 91 subjects who agreed to participate, 59 were diagnosed with schizophrenia and 12 were diagnosed with schizophrenia spectrum disorders (schizophreniform psychosis, schizoaffective or delusional disorder) by DSM-III-R criteria. Diagnoses were established by interviewing the subjects, checking the Finnish Hospital Discharge Register, and reviewing their medical records. To assess recovery, we used the Clinical Global Impressions; the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale; the Social and Occupational Functioning Assessment Scale; and information about psychiatric hospitalizations, use of antipsychotic medication, and occupational status. RESULTS: Only 1 subject (1.7%) with DSM-III-R schizophrenia and 3 subjects (25%) with schizophrenia spectrum disorders fully recovered; 1 schizophrenia subject (1.7%) and 2 schizophrenia spectrum subjects (16.7%) experienced partial recovery. CONCLUSION: The data indicate that, at least until age 35, complete recovery from schizophrenia is rare, and the prognosis for the disorder is far more serious than suggested by some follow-up studies.
PubMed ID
15766305 View in PubMed
Less detail

14 records – page 1 of 2.