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2,8-dihydroxyadeninuria: are there no cases in Scandinavia?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature175743
Source
Scand J Urol Nephrol. 2005;39(1):82-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
2005
Author
Margret Arnadottir
Thröstur Laxdal
Bergljot Halldorsdottir
Author Affiliation
Department of Internal Medicine, Landspitali University Hospital Hringbraut, Reykjavik, Iceland. margarn@landspitali.is
Source
Scand J Urol Nephrol. 2005;39(1):82-6
Date
2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adenine - analogs & derivatives - metabolism - urine
Adenine Phosphoribosyltransferase - deficiency - genetics
Heterozygote
Homozygote
Humans
Mutation
Renal Insufficiency - etiology
Scandinavia - epidemiology
Urinary Calculi - etiology - urine
Abstract
Homozygosity or mixed heterozygosity for mutations in the adenine phosphoribosyltransferase gene cause enzyme deficiency directing adenine through an alternative metabolic pathway. This results in the production of 2,8-dihydroxyadenine, which is actively secreted into the urine. 2,8-dihydroxyadenine is insoluble at physiological urinary pH but as marked supersaturation is possible the manifestations differ: there may be minimal consequences, there may be infiltration of the tubulointerstitial tissue with acute or chronic damage or there may be stone formation in the urinary tract. Effective treatment can be offered and therefore the prognosis depends upon the renal function at diagnosis. Treatment consists of adequate fluid intake, a low-purine diet and administration of allopurinol. Urinary 2,8-dihydroxyadenine crystals are easily recognized under a microscope. The diagnosis of 2,8-dihydroxyadeninuria can be confirmed by estimation of adenine phosphoribosyltransferase activity in erythrocyte lysates. More than 300 cases of 2,8-dihydroxyadeninuria have been diagnosed worldwide, most of them in Japan, France and Iceland. One case has been reported in Finland but there have been no reports from the Scandinavian peninsula or from Denmark. The relevant mutations may be very rare in these countries but underdiagnosis is also possible.
PubMed ID
15764278 View in PubMed
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The 32-base pair deletion of the chemokine receptor 5 gene (CCR5-Delta32) is not associated with primary sclerosing cholangitis in 363 Scandinavian patients.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature168816
Source
Tissue Antigens. 2006 Jul;68(1):78-81
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2006
Author
E. Melum
T H Karlsen
U. Broomé
E. Thorsby
E. Schrumpf
K M Boberg
B A Lie
Author Affiliation
Institute of Immunology, Rikshospitalet University Hospital, Sognsvannsyn 20, 0027 Oslo, Norway.
Source
Tissue Antigens. 2006 Jul;68(1):78-81
Date
Jul-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alleles
Base Pairing
Case-Control Studies
Cholangitis, Sclerosing - etiology
Confidence Intervals
Disease Progression
Female
Gene Deletion
Gene Frequency
Genetic Predisposition to Disease
Humans
Male
Odds Ratio
Receptors, CCR5 - genetics
Scandinavia - epidemiology
Abstract
CCR5 is a chemokine receptor expressed on T-cells and macrophages. A 32-base pair deletion in the chemokine receptor 5 gene (CCR5-Delta32) leads to a non-functional receptor. Conflicting evidence exists whether this deletion is associated with primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC). We genotyped the CCR5-Delta32 variant in 363 PSC patients and 366 controls. No significant increase in the Delta32 allele frequency was detected in the PSC patients compared to controls (12.7% vs 10.7% OR = 1.22, 95% CI [0.88, 1.68], P = 0.23). Survival analysis did not reveal any significant effects from CCR5-Delta32 genotypes on disease progression. Thus, in this study (power > 90%, given OR = 2, alpha = 0.05), we were unable to replicate previous findings and our results do not support an involvement of CCR5-Delta32 in either PSC susceptibility or progression.
Notes
Erratum In: Tissue Antigens. 2006 Aug;68(2):192
PubMed ID
16774544 View in PubMed
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50 years of screening in the Nordic countries: quantifying the effects on cervical cancer incidence.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature257546
Source
Br J Cancer. 2014 Aug 26;111(5):965-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-26-2014
Author
S. Vaccarella
S. Franceschi
G. Engholm
S. Lönnberg
S. Khan
F. Bray
Author Affiliation
International Agency for Research on Cancer, 150 cours Albert Thomas, 69372 Lyon cedex 08, France.
Source
Br J Cancer. 2014 Aug 26;111(5):965-9
Date
Aug-26-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Early Detection of Cancer - methods
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Incidence
Mass Screening - methods
Papillomavirus Infections - epidemiology
Scandinavia - epidemiology
Uterine Cervical Neoplasms - epidemiology - virology
Abstract
Nordic countries' data offer a unique possibility to evaluate the long-term benefit of cervical cancer screening in a context of increasing risk of human papillomavirus infection.
Ad hoc-refined age-period-cohort models were applied to the last 50-year incidence data from Denmark, Finland, Norway and Sweden to project expected cervical cancer cases in a no-screening scenario.
In the absence of screening, projected incidence rates for 2006-2010 in Nordic countries would have been between 3 and 5 times higher than observed rates. Over 60,000 cases or between 41 and 49% of the expected cases of cervical cancer may have been prevented by the introduction of screening in the late 1960s and early 1970s.
Our study suggests that screening programmes might have prevented a HPV-driven epidemic of cervical cancer in Nordic countries. According to extrapolations from cohort effects, cervical cancer incidence rates in the Nordic countries would have been otherwise comparable to the highest incidence rates currently detected in low-income countries.
PubMed ID
24992581 View in PubMed
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[Accidents and accident mortality in Denmark--a comparison with Scandinavia and Europe]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature11630
Source
Nord Med. 1994;109(10):265-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
1994
Author
T B Hansen
N D Röck
A. Poulstrup
S. Sabroe
J. Steensberg
B. Netterstrøm
Author Affiliation
Ortopaedkirurgisk afd 0 og Ulykkes Analyse Gruppen, Odense Universitets Hospital.
Source
Nord Med. 1994;109(10):265-8
Date
1994
Language
Danish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidents - mortality - statistics & numerical data
Accidents, occupational - mortality
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Alcoholic Intoxication - mortality
Comparative Study
Denmark - epidemiology
English Abstract
Europe - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Life expectancy
Male
Middle Aged
Poisoning - mortality
Scandinavia - epidemiology
Abstract
As the development in mean age of the population and life expectancy has been less favourable in Denmark than in the rest of Western Europe, the Ministry of Health decided to investigate statistics for the period, 1972-1990, for the main areas where Danish life expectancy was poorer. A sharp increase in the incidence of accidental poisoning with medical drugs and alcohol during the period was found to be a factor contributing to the poorer Danish statistics during the period. In the subcategory, death after a fall, there was an increase in incidence among the elderly, but the loss of life-years remained constant. The subcategory, fatal road accidents, manifested a marked reduction in incidence, despite the increase in traffic density during the period, and there was a reduction in the loss of life-years. Thus, in the category, accidental deaths, the increase in the incidence of accidental poisonings would appear to be the only factor contributing to the poorer development in mean age and life expectancy in Denmark.
PubMed ID
7937021 View in PubMed
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[A certain increase of skin cancer among pilots].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature184428
Source
Lakartidningen. 2003 Jun 26;100(26-27):2297-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-26-2003
Author
Niklas Hammar
Harald Eliasch
Anette Linnersjö
Bo-Göran Dammström
Maritha Johansson
Eero Pukkala
Author Affiliation
Enheten för epidemiologi, Institutet för miljömedicin, Karolinska institutet, Stockholm. niklas.hammar@imm.ki.se
Source
Lakartidningen. 2003 Jun 26;100(26-27):2297-9
Date
Jun-26-2003
Language
Swedish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aerospace Medicine - manpower
Aircraft
Cosmic Radiation - adverse effects
Humans
Incidence
Male
Melanoma - epidemiology - etiology
Neoplasms, Radiation-Induced - epidemiology - etiology
Occupational Exposure - adverse effects
Registries
Risk factors
Scandinavia - epidemiology
Skin Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology
Notes
Comment In: Lakartidningen. 2003 Jun 26;100(26-27):2278-912872371
PubMed ID
12872376 View in PubMed
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Acute myeloid leukemia following Hodgkin lymphoma: a population-based study of 35,511 patients.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature16487
Source
J Natl Cancer Inst. 2006 Feb 1;98(3):215-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-1-2006
Author
Sara J Schonfeld
Ethel S Gilbert
Graça M Dores
Charles F Lynch
David C Hodgson
Per Hall
Hans Storm
Aage Andersen
Eero Pukkala
Eric Holowaty
Magnus Kaijser
Michael Andersson
Heikki Joensuu
Sophie D Fosså
James M Allan
Lois B Travis
Author Affiliation
Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Department of Health and Human Services, Bethesda, MD 20892-7238, USA.
Source
J Natl Cancer Inst. 2006 Feb 1;98(3):215-8
Date
Feb-1-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Antineoplastic Agents - administration & dosage - adverse effects
Confounding Factors (Epidemiology)
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Hodgkin Disease - drug therapy - therapy
Humans
Incidence
Leukemia, Myelocytic, Acute - chemically induced - epidemiology
Male
Middle Aged
Neoplasms, Second Primary - chemically induced - epidemiology
North America - epidemiology
Ontario - epidemiology
Poisson Distribution
Registries
Research Design
Research Support, N.I.H., Intramural
Risk assessment
SEER Program
Scandinavia - epidemiology
Abstract
Treatments for Hodgkin lymphoma are associated with large relative risks of acute myeloid leukemia (AML), but there are few estimates of the excess absolute risk (EAR), a useful measure of disease burden. One-year Hodgkin lymphoma survivors (N = 35,511) were identified within 14 population-based cancer registries in Nordic countries and North America from January 1, 1970, through December 31, 2001. We used Poisson regression analysis to model the EAR of AML, per 10,000 person-years. A total of 217 Hodgkin lymphoma survivors were diagnosed with AML (10.8 expected; unadjusted EAR = 6.2; 95% confidence interval = 5.4 to 7.1). Excess absolute risk for AML was highest during the first 10 years after Hodgkin lymphoma diagnosis but remained elevated thereafter. In subsequent analyses, adjusted for time since Hodgkin lymphoma diagnosis and presented for the 5-9 year interval, the EAR was statistically significantly (P or = 35 age groups, respectively), which may be associated with modifications in chemotherapy.
PubMed ID
16449681 View in PubMed
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The AdHOC Study of older adults' adherence to medication in 11 countries.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature171755
Source
Am J Geriatr Psychiatry. 2005 Dec;13(12):1067-76
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2005
Author
Claudia Cooper
Iain Carpenter
Cornelius Katona
Marianne Schroll
Cordula Wagner
Daniela Fialova
Gill Livingston
Author Affiliation
Camden and Islington Mental Health and Social Care Trust, Dept. of Mental Health Sciences, University College London, Archway Campus, Holborn Union Building, Highgate Hill, London N19 5NL, UK.
Source
Am J Geriatr Psychiatry. 2005 Dec;13(12):1067-76
Date
Dec-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Cross-Sectional Studies
Czech Republic - epidemiology
Demography
Drug Therapy - statistics & numerical data
England - epidemiology
Female
France - epidemiology
Germany - epidemiology
Humans
Italy - epidemiology
Logistic Models
Male
Netherlands - epidemiology
Patient Compliance - statistics & numerical data
Scandinavia - epidemiology
Abstract
Authors investigated, cross-nationally, the factors, including demographic, psychiatric (including cognitive), physical, and behavioral, determining whether older people take their prescribed medication. Older adults are prescribed more medication than any other group, and poor adherence is a common reason for non-response to medication.
Researchers interviewed 3,881 people over age 65 who receive home care services in 11 countries, administering a structured interview in participants' homes. The main outcome measure was the percentage of participants not adherent to medication.
In all, 12.5% of people (N=456) reported that they were not fully adherent to medication. Non-adherence was predicted by problem drinking (OR=3.6), not having a doctor review their medication (OR=3.3), greater cognitive impairment (OR=1.4 for every one-point increase in impairment), good physical health (OR=1.2), resisting care (OR=2.1), being unmarried (OR=2.3), and living in the Czech Republic (OR=4.7) or Germany (OR=1.4).
People who screen positive for problem drinking and who have dementia (often undiagnosed) are less likely to adhere to medication. Therefore, doctors should consider dementia and problem drinking when prescribing for older adults. Interventions to improve adherence in older adults might be more effective if targeted at these groups. It is possible that medication-review enhances adherence by improving the doctor-patient relationship or by emphasizing the need for medications.
PubMed ID
16319299 View in PubMed
Less detail

Admission profile is predictive of outcome in acute hospital care.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature90238
Source
Aging Clin Exp Res. 2008 Dec;20(6):533-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2008
Author
Jónsson Pálmi V
Noro Anja
Finne-Soveri Harriet
Jensdóttir Anna B
Ljunggren Gunnar
Bucht Gösta
Grue Else V
Björnson Jan
Jonsén Elisabeth
Schroll Marianne
Author Affiliation
Department of Geriatrics, Landspitali University Hospital, Faculty of Medicine, University of Iceland, Reykjavik, Iceland. palmivj@landspitali.is
Source
Aging Clin Exp Res. 2008 Dec;20(6):533-9
Date
Dec-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acute Disease - mortality
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Aging
Comorbidity
Female
Hospital Mortality
Hospitalization - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Institutionalization - statistics & numerical data
Male
Patient Discharge - statistics & numerical data
Predictive value of tests
Prospective Studies
Scandinavia - epidemiology
Urban Population - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
BACKGROUND AND AIMS: The purpose of this study is to describe predictors for discharge and one-year outcomes of acute-care hospital patients, 75 years of age or over, based on admission status information. We carried out a prospective study of a randomly selected patient population, from one urban acute-care hospital in each of the Nordic countries. 763 persons aged 75+ were randomly selected from acute admissions to the participating hospitals. 749 observations at discharge and 655 observations at one year were used in analyses. METHODS: Data were collected with the MDS-AC 1.1 instrument within 24 hours of admission, and at day 7 or discharge, whichever came first. Outcome information was collected either by interviewing the patient or from patient records or registers. Discharge and one-year outcome (home, institution, death) were modeled by multinomial logistic regression, with admission status variables as predictors. RESULTS: At discharge, 84% of subjects returned home, 11% went to an institution and 5.6% had died. At one year, 64% were still living at home, 24% had died, and 12% had moved to an institution. For discharge outcome, those having hospital admission due to a new problem or exacerbation of an old one had a higher risk of dying (OR 3.3) than returning home. Moderate to severe cognitive problems predicted death (OR 2.2) and institutionalization (OR 8.6) compared with discharge home. Problems in instrumental activities of daily living predicted death (OR 3.1) and institutionalization (OR 6.0). At one year, those with exacerbation of an old problem (OR 2.1) or with a new or exacerbated existing problem (OR 2.3) had a higher risk of dying than of institutionalization or discharge home. Having some cognitive problems (OR 2.8) or moderate to severe cognitive problems (OR 6.6) predicted institutionalization, but not dying or discharge home. Those with some problems in activities of daily living had a higher risk of both dying (OR 1.7) and of institutional care (OR 2.7). Those with moderate to severe problems in activities of daily living had also a higher risk of institutional care (OR 4.7) compared with those living at home. CONCLUSIONS: Evidence predictive of discharge and one-year outcomes in older acute hospital medical care patients seems to be visible from the beginning of the hospital stay. In order to increase the efficient use of health care services and quality of care, systematic standardized and streamlined assessment should be performed during the admission process.
PubMed ID
19179837 View in PubMed
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Adult life after childhood cancer in Scandinavia: diabetes mellitus following treatment for cancer in childhood.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature105033
Source
Eur J Cancer. 2014 Apr;50(6):1169-75
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2014
Author
Anna Sällfors Holmqvist
Jørgen H Olsen
Klaus Kaae Andersen
Sofie de Fine Licht
Lars Hjorth
Stanislaw Garwicz
Christian Moëll
Harald Anderson
Finn Wesenberg
Laufey Tryggvadottir
Nea Malila
John D Boice
Henrik Hasle
Jeanette Falck Winther
Author Affiliation
Paediatric Oncology and Haematology, Skåne University Hospital, Department of Clinical Sciences, Lund University, Lund, Sweden. Electronic address: anna.sallfors-holmqvist@med.lu.se.
Source
Eur J Cancer. 2014 Apr;50(6):1169-75
Date
Apr-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Child
Child, Preschool
Cohort Studies
Comorbidity
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 1 - diagnosis - epidemiology
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 - diagnosis - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Male
Middle Aged
Multivariate Analysis
Neoplasms - classification - epidemiology - therapy
Proportional Hazards Models
Registries - statistics & numerical data
Risk Assessment - statistics & numerical data
Risk factors
Scandinavia - epidemiology
Survivors - statistics & numerical data
Young Adult
Abstract
An increased risk for diabetes mellitus (DM) adds significantly to the burden of late complications in childhood cancer survivors. Complications of DM may be prevented by using appropriate screening. It is, therefore, important to better characterise the reported increased risk for DM in a large population-based setting.
From the national cancer registries of the five Nordic countries, a cohort of 32,903 1-year survivors of cancer diagnosed before the age of 20 between start of cancer registration in the 1940s and 1950s through 2008 was identified; 212,393 comparison subjects of the same age, gender and country were selected from national population registers. Study subjects were linked to the national hospital registers. Absolute excess risks (AERs) and standardised hospitalisation rate ratios (SHRRs) were calculated.
DM was diagnosed in 496 childhood cancer survivors, yielding an overall SHRR of 1.6 (95% confidence interval (CI), 1.5-1.8) and an AER of 43 per 100,000 person-years, increasing from approximately 20 extra cases of DM in ages 0-19 to more than 100 extra cases per 100,000 person-years in ages > or =50. The relative risks for DM were significantly increased after Wilms' tumour (SHRR, 2.9), leukaemia (2.0), CNS neoplasms (1.8), germ-cell neoplasms (1.7), malignant bone tumours (1.7) and Hodgkin's lymphoma (1.6). The risk for DM type 2 was slightly higher than that for type 1.
Childhood cancer survivors are at increased risk for DM, with absolute risks increasing throughout life. These findings underscore the need for preventive interventions and prolonged follow-up of childhood cancer survivors.
PubMed ID
24507548 View in PubMed
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568 records – page 1 of 57.