Skip header and navigation

Refine By

2206 records – page 1 of 221.

2,8-dihydroxyadeninuria: are there no cases in Scandinavia?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature175743
Source
Scand J Urol Nephrol. 2005;39(1):82-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
2005
Author
Margret Arnadottir
Thröstur Laxdal
Bergljot Halldorsdottir
Author Affiliation
Department of Internal Medicine, Landspitali University Hospital Hringbraut, Reykjavik, Iceland. margarn@landspitali.is
Source
Scand J Urol Nephrol. 2005;39(1):82-6
Date
2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adenine - analogs & derivatives - metabolism - urine
Adenine Phosphoribosyltransferase - deficiency - genetics
Heterozygote
Homozygote
Humans
Mutation
Renal Insufficiency - etiology
Scandinavia - epidemiology
Urinary Calculi - etiology - urine
Abstract
Homozygosity or mixed heterozygosity for mutations in the adenine phosphoribosyltransferase gene cause enzyme deficiency directing adenine through an alternative metabolic pathway. This results in the production of 2,8-dihydroxyadenine, which is actively secreted into the urine. 2,8-dihydroxyadenine is insoluble at physiological urinary pH but as marked supersaturation is possible the manifestations differ: there may be minimal consequences, there may be infiltration of the tubulointerstitial tissue with acute or chronic damage or there may be stone formation in the urinary tract. Effective treatment can be offered and therefore the prognosis depends upon the renal function at diagnosis. Treatment consists of adequate fluid intake, a low-purine diet and administration of allopurinol. Urinary 2,8-dihydroxyadenine crystals are easily recognized under a microscope. The diagnosis of 2,8-dihydroxyadeninuria can be confirmed by estimation of adenine phosphoribosyltransferase activity in erythrocyte lysates. More than 300 cases of 2,8-dihydroxyadeninuria have been diagnosed worldwide, most of them in Japan, France and Iceland. One case has been reported in Finland but there have been no reports from the Scandinavian peninsula or from Denmark. The relevant mutations may be very rare in these countries but underdiagnosis is also possible.
PubMed ID
15764278 View in PubMed
Less detail

A 6-month, randomized, double-masked comparison of latanoprost with timolol in patients with open angle glaucoma or ocular hypertension.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature212248
Source
Acta Ophthalmol Scand. 1996 Apr;74(2):140-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-1996
Author
B. Friström
Author Affiliation
Department of Ophthalmology, University of Linköping, Sweden.
Source
Acta Ophthalmol Scand. 1996 Apr;74(2):140-4
Date
Apr-1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adrenergic beta-Antagonists - administration & dosage - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Double-Blind Method
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Glaucoma, Open-Angle - drug therapy - physiopathology
Humans
Intraocular Pressure - drug effects
Male
Middle Aged
Ocular Hypertension - drug therapy - physiopathology
Ophthalmic Solutions
Prostaglandins F, Synthetic - administration & dosage - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Safety
Scandinavia
Timolol - administration & dosage - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Abstract
The intraocular pressure reducing effect and side-effects of latanoprost, a phenyl-substituted prostaglandin analogue, were compared with those of timolol, in a group of 31 glaucomatous or ocular hypertensive patients, divided into three subgroups. The study was randomized and double masked. At the end of 6 month's treatment with latanoprost 0.005% once daily, either as a morning dose or as an evening dose, there was a reduction in intraocular pressure of 33% (p
PubMed ID
8739678 View in PubMed
Less detail

7,528 patients treated with PCI--a Scandinavian real-life scenario.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature160536
Source
Cardiology. 2008;110(2):96-105
Publication Type
Article
Date
2008
Author
Sune Pedersen
Søren Galatius
Jan Bech
Erik Jørgensen
Kari Saunamaki
Steffen Helqist
Jan Skov Jensen
Henning Kelbaek
Jan Kyst Madsen
Author Affiliation
Cardiac Catheterisation Laboratory, Heart Clinic, Copenhagen, Denmark. sunped01@geh.regionh.dk
Source
Cardiology. 2008;110(2):96-105
Date
2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Angioplasty, Balloon, Coronary - statistics & numerical data
Coronary Angiography
Coronary Artery Disease - epidemiology - radiography - therapy
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Retrospective Studies
Risk factors
Scandinavia
Stents - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
Analyze clinical, temporal and procedural characteristics from 7,528 consecutive percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) patients in one of the largest published contemporary European PCI-database during a 6-year period.
Retrospective study design.
1998-2004. Temporal and referral changes in a Danish PCI-registry were analyzed. Demographic and angiographic variables were compared with data from randomized clinical trials, US-registries and current guidelines.
22,214 patients were examined with coronary angiography and 7,528 patients were treated with PCI. The annual number of PCI's increased by 15%. Over time, the fraction of patients with risk factors increased, median age increased from 61 to 64 years and the coronary pathology was significantly worsened. ST-elevation myocardial infarction patients primarily admitted to hospitals without facilities for primary angioplasty, were less likely to receive primary PCI. Baseline-data were in general in par with randomized clinical trial study populations and large-scale US data-registries. Interestingly, 14% of all PCI-procedures were performed on patients with a clinical presentation, for which coronary artery bypass grafting would be recommended by guidelines.
PCI is performed in an increasingly sicker population, but generally in accordance with randomized trials and similar to US tradition. However, 14% were treated with PCI even though coronary artery bypass grafting was recommended by guidelines.
PubMed ID
17971658 View in PubMed
Less detail

A 24-month evaluation of amalgam and resin-based composite restorations: Findings from The National Dental Practice-Based Research Network.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature113423
Source
J Am Dent Assoc. 2013 Jun;144(6):583-93
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2013
Author
Michael S McCracken
Valeria V Gordan
Mark S Litaker
Ellen Funkhouser
Jeffrey L Fellows
Douglass G Shamp
Vibeke Qvist
Jeffrey S Meral
Gregg H Gilbert
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical and Community Sciences, School of Dentistry, University of Alabama at Birmingham, AL, USA.
Source
J Am Dent Assoc. 2013 Jun;144(6):583-93
Date
Jun-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Child
Child, Preschool
Cohort Studies
Community-Based Participatory Research
Composite Resins - standards
Dental Amalgam - standards
Dental Materials - standards
Dental Prosthesis Repair - statistics & numerical data
Dental Restoration Failure - statistics & numerical data
Dental Restoration, Permanent - classification - standards
Dentists - statistics & numerical data
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Forecasting
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Prospective Studies
Risk factors
Scandinavia
Sex Factors
Surface Properties
United States
Workload
Young Adult
Abstract
Knowing which factors influence restoration longevity can help clinicians make sound treatment decisions. The authors analyzed data from The National Dental Practice-Based Research Network to identify predictors of early failures of amalgam and resin-based composite (RBC) restorations.
In this prospective cohort study, the authors gathered information from clinicians and offices participating in the network. Clinicians completed a baseline data collection form at the time of restoration placement and annually thereafter. Data collected included patient factors, practice factors and dentist factors, and the authors analyzed them by using mixed-model logistic regression.
A total of 226 practitioners followed up 6,218 direct restorations in 3,855 patients; 386 restorations failed (6.2 percent) during the mean (standard deviation) follow-up of 23.7 (8.8) months. The number of tooth surfaces restored at baseline helped predict subsequent restoration failure; restorations with four or more restored surfaces were more than four times more likely to fail. Restorative material was not associated significantly with longevity; neither was tooth type. Older patient age was associated highly with failure (P
Notes
Cites: J Am Dent Assoc. 2005 Jun;136(6):790-616022046
Cites: Clin Oral Investig. 2003 Jun;7(2):63-7012768463
Cites: JAMA. 2006 Apr 19;295(15):1775-8316622139
Cites: J Dent. 2006 Aug;34(7):427-3516314023
Cites: Dent Mater J. 2006 Sep;25(3):611-517076335
Cites: J Dent. 2007 Feb;35(2):124-916956709
Cites: J Am Dent Assoc. 2007 Jun;138(6):763-7217545265
Cites: J Am Dent Assoc. 2007 Jun;138(6):775-8317545266
Cites: Public Health Rep. 2007 Sep-Oct;122(5):657-6317877313
Cites: J Adhes Dent. 2007 Oct;9(5):469-7518297828
Cites: Br Dent J. 2003 Jun 14;194(11):613-8; discussion 60912819697
Cites: J Dent. 2012 Oct;40(10):829-3522771415
Cites: J Dent. 2003 Aug;31(6):395-40512878022
Cites: J Med Syst. 2003 Oct;27(5):445-5614584621
Cites: J Am Dent Assoc. 2004 May;135(5):637-4515202758
Cites: J Am Dent Assoc. 1988 May;116(6):651-43164030
Cites: J Dent. 1996 Jul;24(4):257-628783530
Cites: Oper Dent. 1994 Jul-Aug;19(4):127-329028231
Cites: Br Dent J. 1997 May 24;182(10):373-819185355
Cites: J Am Dent Assoc. 1998 Dec;129(12):1757-99854929
Cites: Environ Health Perspect. 2008 Mar;116(3):394-918335109
Cites: J Dent. 2008 May;36(5):343-5018313826
Cites: J Am Dent Assoc. 2010 Apr;141(4):441-820354094
Cites: J Dent. 2005 Nov;33(10):827-3516246480
Cites: J Dent. 2012 May;40(5):397-40522342563
Cites: Acta Odontol Scand. 1999 Oct;57(5):257-6210614902
Cites: J Dent. 2000 Feb;28(2):111-610666968
Cites: J Adhes Dent. 2001 Spring;3(1):45-6411317384
Cites: Acta Odontol Scand. 2001 Apr;59(2):57-6211370750
Cites: Community Dent Health. 2001 Dec;18(4):236-4111789702
Cites: Oper Dent. 2002 Sep-Oct;27(5):488-9212216568
Cites: Community Dent Health. 2010 Mar;27(1):18-2220426256
Cites: J Dent Res. 2010 Oct;89(10):1063-720660797
Cites: J Am Dent Assoc. 2011 Apr;142(4):429-4021454850
Cites: J Am Dent Assoc. 2011 Jun;142(6):622-3221628683
Cites: Dent Mater. 2012 Jan;28(1):87-10122192253
Cites: Bull Environ Contam Toxicol. 2012 May;88(5):797-80122395198
Comment In: J Am Dent Assoc. 2013 Nov;144(11):1220, 122224177394
Comment In: J Am Dent Assoc. 2013 Nov;144(11):122024177393
PubMed ID
23729455 View in PubMed
Less detail

The 26th Congress: a successful event north of the Arctic Circle.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature192331
Source
Acta Anaesthesiol Scand. 2001 Nov;45(10):1285-9
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Date
Nov-2001
Author
L J Bjertnaes
Source
Acta Anaesthesiol Scand. 2001 Nov;45(10):1285-9
Date
Nov-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Keywords
Anesthesiology
Emergency Medicine
Humans
Intensive Care
Scandinavia
Societies, Medical
PubMed ID
11736684 View in PubMed
Less detail

The 26th Congress of the Scandinavian Society of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care Medicine, Tromso, Norway, 13-17 June 2001.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature193633
Source
Crit Care. 2001 Aug;5(4):204-6
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Date
Aug-2001
Source
Crit Care. 2001 Aug;5(4):204-6
Date
Aug-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Keywords
Anesthesiology
Humans
Intensive Care
Pain - drug therapy
Scandinavia
Sepsis - drug therapy
Societies, Medical
Abstract
The 26th Congress of the Scandinavian Society of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care Medicine took place in the state-of-the art Tromso University Hospital. There were over 500 participants, and approximately 300 oral and poster presentations highlighted the latest progress in diverse areas. Much interest focused on activated protein C (APC) and other ways forward in sepsis treatment, pain management, novel markers of neurotrauma and antioxidants in bypass surgery. The meeting continues to be the leading anaesthesiology and intensive care conference in the region.
PubMed ID
11511333 View in PubMed
Less detail

The 32-base pair deletion of the chemokine receptor 5 gene (CCR5-Delta32) is not associated with primary sclerosing cholangitis in 363 Scandinavian patients.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature168816
Source
Tissue Antigens. 2006 Jul;68(1):78-81
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2006
Author
E. Melum
T H Karlsen
U. Broomé
E. Thorsby
E. Schrumpf
K M Boberg
B A Lie
Author Affiliation
Institute of Immunology, Rikshospitalet University Hospital, Sognsvannsyn 20, 0027 Oslo, Norway.
Source
Tissue Antigens. 2006 Jul;68(1):78-81
Date
Jul-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alleles
Base Pairing
Case-Control Studies
Cholangitis, Sclerosing - etiology
Confidence Intervals
Disease Progression
Female
Gene Deletion
Gene Frequency
Genetic Predisposition to Disease
Humans
Male
Odds Ratio
Receptors, CCR5 - genetics
Scandinavia - epidemiology
Abstract
CCR5 is a chemokine receptor expressed on T-cells and macrophages. A 32-base pair deletion in the chemokine receptor 5 gene (CCR5-Delta32) leads to a non-functional receptor. Conflicting evidence exists whether this deletion is associated with primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC). We genotyped the CCR5-Delta32 variant in 363 PSC patients and 366 controls. No significant increase in the Delta32 allele frequency was detected in the PSC patients compared to controls (12.7% vs 10.7% OR = 1.22, 95% CI [0.88, 1.68], P = 0.23). Survival analysis did not reveal any significant effects from CCR5-Delta32 genotypes on disease progression. Thus, in this study (power > 90%, given OR = 2, alpha = 0.05), we were unable to replicate previous findings and our results do not support an involvement of CCR5-Delta32 in either PSC susceptibility or progression.
Notes
Erratum In: Tissue Antigens. 2006 Aug;68(2):192
PubMed ID
16774544 View in PubMed
Less detail

50 years of screening in the Nordic countries: quantifying the effects on cervical cancer incidence.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature257546
Source
Br J Cancer. 2014 Aug 26;111(5):965-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-26-2014
Author
S. Vaccarella
S. Franceschi
G. Engholm
S. Lönnberg
S. Khan
F. Bray
Author Affiliation
International Agency for Research on Cancer, 150 cours Albert Thomas, 69372 Lyon cedex 08, France.
Source
Br J Cancer. 2014 Aug 26;111(5):965-9
Date
Aug-26-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Early Detection of Cancer - methods
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Incidence
Mass Screening - methods
Papillomavirus Infections - epidemiology
Scandinavia - epidemiology
Uterine Cervical Neoplasms - epidemiology - virology
Abstract
Nordic countries' data offer a unique possibility to evaluate the long-term benefit of cervical cancer screening in a context of increasing risk of human papillomavirus infection.
Ad hoc-refined age-period-cohort models were applied to the last 50-year incidence data from Denmark, Finland, Norway and Sweden to project expected cervical cancer cases in a no-screening scenario.
In the absence of screening, projected incidence rates for 2006-2010 in Nordic countries would have been between 3 and 5 times higher than observed rates. Over 60,000 cases or between 41 and 49% of the expected cases of cervical cancer may have been prevented by the introduction of screening in the late 1960s and early 1970s.
Our study suggests that screening programmes might have prevented a HPV-driven epidemic of cervical cancer in Nordic countries. According to extrapolations from cohort effects, cervical cancer incidence rates in the Nordic countries would have been otherwise comparable to the highest incidence rates currently detected in low-income countries.
PubMed ID
24992581 View in PubMed
Less detail

ABO blood-groups in Parkinson's disease.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature102494
Source
Acta Pathol Microbiol Scand. 1965;65(4):653.
Publication Type
Article
Date
1965

2206 records – page 1 of 221.