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Achieving "proper" satiety in different social contexts--qualitative interpretations from a cross-disciplinary project, sociomaet.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature187281
Source
Appetite. 2002 Dec;39(3):207-15
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2002
Author
S T Kristensen
L. Holm
A. Raben
A. Astrup
Author Affiliation
Research Department of Human Nutrition, Centre for Advanced Food Studies, The Royal Veterinary and Agricultural University, 30 Rolighedsvej, 1958 Frederiksberg C, Denmark. stk@kvl.dk
Source
Appetite. 2002 Dec;39(3):207-15
Date
Dec-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Appetite - physiology
Body mass index
Culture
Denmark
Female
Food Habits - physiology - psychology
Humans
Interpersonal Relations
Interviews as Topic
Male
Obesity - prevention & control
Satiation
Satiety Response - physiology
Social Behavior
Abstract
In nutritional research, the sensations of appetite have mostly been studied as a physiological phenomenon. However, in order to understand the significance of appetite for everyday eating habits, it is pertinent to include the social dimension. In a qualitative interview study, using qualitative semi-structured in-depth interviews, we investigated how appetite was experienced and handled in the context of everyday life among 20 men and women. This report examines how qualitative dimensions of appetite are experienced and conceptualised in everyday life. Achieving what was described as proper satiety was found to be of decisive importance for daily eating habits. The experience of being full up, the duration of satiety and the sensuous pleasure of eating were all found to be central dimensions of proper satiety, the definition of which varied according to different social contexts. Whether one ate one's fill in the company of others, alone, at work or in one's spare time turned out to be of decisive importance. A more elaborate understanding of the social dimensions of appetite may help to improve endeavours to prevent overweight and obesity.
PubMed ID
12495694 View in PubMed
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Acute effect of alginate-based preload on satiety feelings, energy intake, and gastric emptying rate in healthy subjects.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature132787
Source
Obesity (Silver Spring). 2012 Sep;20(9):1851-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2012
Author
Morten Georg Jensen
Mette Kristensen
Anita Belza
Jes C Knudsen
Arne Astrup
Author Affiliation
Department of Human Nutrition, Faculty of Life Sciences, University of Copenhagen, Frederiksberg, Denmark. mmgj@life.ku.dk
Source
Obesity (Silver Spring). 2012 Sep;20(9):1851-8
Date
Sep-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Alginates - therapeutic use
Anti-Obesity Agents - therapeutic use
Blood Glucose - drug effects
Blood Pressure - drug effects
Body mass index
Cross-Over Studies
Denmark - epidemiology
Dietary Fiber - therapeutic use
Double-Blind Method
Energy Intake - drug effects - physiology
Female
Gastric Emptying - drug effects - physiology
Glucuronic Acid - therapeutic use
Heart Rate - drug effects
Hexuronic Acids - therapeutic use
Humans
Insulin - blood
Male
Postprandial Period
Reference Values
Satiation - drug effects - physiology
Abstract
Viscous dietary fibers such as sodium alginate extracted from brown seaweed have received much attention lately for their potential role in energy regulation through the inhibition of energy intake and increase of satiety feelings. The aim of our study was to investigate the effect on postprandial satiety feelings, energy intake, and gastric emptying rate (GER), by the paracetamol method, of two different volumes of an alginate-based preload in normal-weight subjects. In a four-way placebo-controlled, double-blind, crossover trial, 20 subjects (age: 25.9 ± 3.4 years; BMI: 23.5 ± 1.7 kg/m(2)) were randomly assigned to receive a 3% preload concentration of either low volume (LV; 9.9 g alginate in 330 ml) or high volume (HV; 15.0 g alginate in 500 ml) alginate-based beverage, or an iso-volume placebo beverage. The preloads were ingested 30 min before a fixed breakfast and again before an ad libitum lunch. Consumption of LV-alginate preload induced a significantly lower (8.0%) energy intake than the placebo beverage (P = 0.040) at the following lunch meal, without differences in satiety feelings or paracetamol concentrations. The HV alginate significantly increased satiety feelings (P = 0.038), reduced hunger (P = 0.042) and the feeling of prospective food consumption (P = 0.027), and reduced area under the curve (iAUC) paracetamol concentrations compared to the placebo (P = 0.05). However, only a 5.5% reduction in energy intake was observed for HV alginate (P = 0.20). Although they are somewhat contradictory, our results suggest that alginate consumption does affect satiety feelings and energy intake. However, further investigation on the volume of alginate administered is needed before inferring that this fiber has a possible role in short-term energy regulation.
PubMed ID
21779093 View in PubMed
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Behavioural and metabolic characterisation of the low satiety phenotype.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature112841
Source
Appetite. 2013 Nov;70:67-72
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2013
Author
V. Drapeau
J. Blundell
A R Gallant
H. Arguin
J-P Després
B. Lamarche
A. Tremblay
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Educational Sciences, Department of Physical Education, Laval University, Quebec, QC, Canada. vicky.drapeau@fse.ulaval.ca
Source
Appetite. 2013 Nov;70:67-72
Date
Nov-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Anxiety - physiopathology
Appetite - physiology
Body Height
Body mass index
Cross-Sectional Studies
Eating - psychology
Humans
Hunger - physiology
Male
Meals
Middle Aged
Obesity - physiopathology
Phenotype
Quebec
Questionnaires
Reproducibility of Results
Satiation - physiology
Weight Loss
Abstract
Some individuals report weak appetite sensations and thus, have higher susceptibility to overeating. The aim of this study was (1) to evaluate the reliability of the satiety quotient (SQ), a marker of satiety efficiency; (2) to characterize the biopsychobehavioural profiles of individual presenting low satiety efficiency, i.e. the low satiety phenotype and (3) to document the impact of a weight loss program on these profiles. Sixty-nine obese men (BMI 33.6±3.0 kg/m², age 41.5±5.7 years) participated in a 16-week, non-restrictive weight loss intervention. Visual analog scales for appetite sensations in response to a test-meal were completed twice at baseline. Blood samples were collected before and during one test-meal. Questionnaires were administered before and after the intervention. The mean SQ showed good reliability (ICC=0.67). Baseline SQ scores tended to be negatively correlated with external hunger, anxiety and night eating symptoms (p
PubMed ID
23792908 View in PubMed
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Body composition impacts appetite regulation in middle childhood. A prospective study of Norwegian community children.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature287229
Source
Int J Behav Nutr Phys Act. 2017 05 30;14(1):70
Publication Type
Article
Date
05-30-2017
Author
Silje Steinsbekk
Clare H Llewellyn
Alison Fildes
Lars Wichstrøm
Source
Int J Behav Nutr Phys Act. 2017 05 30;14(1):70
Date
05-30-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Appetite - physiology
Appetite Regulation - physiology
Body Composition - physiology
Child
Eating
Feeding Behavior - physiology
Female
Food
Humans
Male
Norway
Prospective Studies
Satiation
Surveys and Questionnaires
Abstract
Research suggests a role for both fat mass and muscle mass in appetite regulation, but the longitudinal relationships between them have not yet been examined in children. The present study therefore aimed to explore the prospective relationships between fat mass, muscle mass and the appetitive traits food responsiveness and satiety responsiveness in middle childhood.
Food responsiveness and satiety responsiveness were measured using the parent-reported Children's Eating Behavior Questionnaire in a representative sample of Norwegian 6?year olds, followed up at 8 and 10?years of age (n?=?807). Body composition was measured by bioelectrical impedance.
Applying a structural equation modeling framework we found that higher fat mass predicted greater increases in food responsiveness over time, whereas greater muscle mass predicted decreases in satiety responsiveness. This pattern was consistent both from ages 6 to 8 and from ages 8 to 10?years.
Our study is the first to reveal that fat mass and muscle mass predict distinct changes in different appetitive traits over time. Replication of findings in non-European populations are needed, as are studies of children in other age groups. Future studies should also aim to reveal the underlying mechanisms.
Notes
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PubMed ID
28558723 View in PubMed
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[Can health claims made on food be scientifically substantiated? Review on satiety and weight management]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature89551
Source
Laeknabladid. 2009 Mar;95(3):195-200
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2009
Author
Gunnarsdottir Ingibjorg
Due Annette
Karhunen Leila
Lyly Marika
Author Affiliation
ingigun@landspitali.is
Source
Laeknabladid. 2009 Mar;95(3):195-200
Date
Mar-2009
Language
Icelandic
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Consumer Product Safety - legislation & jurisprudence
Dietary Fiber - administration & dosage
Dietary Proteins - administration & dosage
European Union
Evidence-Based Medicine
Food Labeling - legislation & jurisprudence
Government Regulation
Humans
Legislation, Food
Nutrition Policy
Nutritive Value
Obesity - diet therapy - physiopathology
Satiation
Treatment Outcome
Weight Loss
Abstract
Obesity is becoming an increasing health problem and results when energy intake exceeds energy expenditure. Food has a crucial role in weight management. The new EU legislation on nutrition and health claims permits the use of weight regulation and satiety related health claims on foods, if they are based on generally accepted scientific evidence. In this review the current knowledge on food properties, that have been proposed to affect satiety and/or energy expenditure and thus might be useful in weight control are considered, as part of the project "Substantiation of weight regulation and satiety related health claims on foods" funded by the Nordic Innovation Centre. At this point the scientific evidence of the short term effects of dietary fibers and proteins in relation to satiety seems to be convincing. However, it might be challenging to make product specific satiety and weight management claims as the dose response is not always known. On the other hand two step health claims might be applied, for example rich in dietary fibre - dietary fibre can increase satiety or rich in protein - protein can increase satiety.
PubMed ID
19318712 View in PubMed
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Cultural and social acceptability of a healthy diet.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature54991
Source
Eur J Clin Nutr. 1993 Aug;47(8):592-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-1993
Author
L. Holm
Author Affiliation
Research Department of Human Nutrition, Royal Veterinary and Agricultural University, Frederiksberg, Denmark.
Source
Eur J Clin Nutr. 1993 Aug;47(8):592-9
Date
Aug-1993
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Attitude to Health - ethnology
Coronary Disease - prevention & control
Cultural Characteristics
Denmark
Diet - adverse effects - economics - psychology
Female
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Health promotion
Humans
Hunger
Life Style
Male
Nutrition - education
Nutritional Requirements
Questionnaires
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Satiation
Social Values
Abstract
The extent to which the dietary practices recommended by nutrition science are compatible with an enjoyable lifestyle is a recurring theme in the debate on food and health in Denmark. The aim of this study was to see in practice what problems arise when ordinary people are confronted with a healthy diet. Fourteen of the participants in an 8 month dietary intervention study were interviewed about their opinions of, and experiences with, a diet composed in accordance with the Nordic nutrition recommendations. The interviews were qualitative, in depth and semistructured. The participants were interviewed twice, the first time towards the end of the intervention and again 3 months after the intervention ended. The interviews were transcribed verbatim and analysed thematically. For the participants, who were young students with a relatively high knowledge of nutrition, practical experience of a recommended diet was a series of surprises: the amount of food, its similarity to modern Danish food culture, its palatability, and the relatively small amount of dairy products in the diet were contrary to participants expectations. Participants found the recommended diet pleasant to live on, but expected certain economical and practical difficulties in applying it to everyday life outside the intervention. Hunger and satiety sensations changed and became more distinct. The results of the study indicate suggestions relevant for both industrial product development and nutrition information to the public.
PubMed ID
8404795 View in PubMed
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Effect of the glycemic index and content of indigestible carbohydrates of cereal-based breakfast meals on glucose tolerance at lunch in healthy subjects.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature202478
Source
Am J Clin Nutr. 1999 Apr;69(4):647-55
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-1999
Author
H G Liljeberg
A K Akerberg
I M Björck
Author Affiliation
Department of Applied Nutrition and Food Chemistry, Chemical Center, Lund University, Sweden. Helena.Liljeberg@inl.lth.se
Source
Am J Clin Nutr. 1999 Apr;69(4):647-55
Date
Apr-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Cereals
Dietary Carbohydrates - administration & dosage - pharmacology
Dietary Fiber - pharmacology
Digestion
Eating
Fasting - blood
Female
Glucose - metabolism
Hordeum - metabolism
Humans
Insulin - blood
Male
Middle Aged
Postprandial Period
Satiation - drug effects
Sweden
Triticum - metabolism
Abstract
Diets with a low glycemic index (GI) have been shown to improve glucose tolerance in both healthy and diabetic subjects. Two potential mechanisms are discussed in relation to long-term metabolic effects: a decreased demand for insulin in the postprandial phase and formation of short-chain fatty acids from fermentation of indigestible carbohydrates in the colon.
The objective was to study the effect of the GI and the indigestible carbohydrate--resistant starch (RS) and dietary fiber (DF)--content of cereal-based breakfasts on glucose tolerance at a second meal (lunch) in healthy subjects.
The effects of 7 test breakfasts with known GIs (GI: 52-99) and RS + DF contents (2-36 g) were evaluated. White-wheat bread was used as a reference breakfast (high GI, low RS + DF content). Glucose and insulin responses after the second meal were measured in healthy subjects. In addition, the satiating capacity of 4 of the 7 test breakfasts was estimated before and during the second meal.
Two of the 4 low-GI breakfasts improved glucose tolerance at the second meal. Only these 2 breakfasts were capable of postponing the in-between-meal fasting state. There was no measurable effect of fermentable carbohydrates on glucose tolerance at the second meal. The highest satiety score was associated with the barley breakfast that had a low GI and a high RS + DF content.
Glucose tolerance can improve in a single day. Slow absorption and digestion of starch from the breakfast meal, but not the content of indigestible carbohydrates in the breakfast meal, improved glucose tolerance at the second meal (lunch).
PubMed ID
10197565 View in PubMed
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Examining behavioural susceptibility to obesity among Canadian pre-school children: the role of eating behaviours.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature140903
Source
Int J Pediatr Obes. 2011 Jun;6(2-2):e501-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2011
Author
John C Spence
Valerie Carson
Linda Casey
Normand Boule
Author Affiliation
University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB, Canada. jc.spence@ualberta.ca
Source
Int J Pediatr Obes. 2011 Jun;6(2-2):e501-7
Date
Jun-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Alberta
Analysis of Variance
Appetite
Body Height
Body mass index
Body Weight
Chi-Square Distribution
Child Behavior
Child, Preschool
Cross-Sectional Studies
Drinking Behavior
Emotions
Feeding Behavior
Female
Humans
Male
Obesity - diagnosis - prevention & control - psychology
Questionnaires
Risk assessment
Risk factors
Satiation
Abstract
No study has examined a comprehensive set of approach and avoidance eating behaviours and their relationship with bodyweight among North American children. The purpose of this study was to test whether a variety of individual eating behaviours differed among weight status groups in a sample of Canadian pre-school children.
The sample included 4 and 5-year-old children (N=1 730), who attended a health center in and around Edmonton, Alberta, for a pre-school immunization shot between November 2005 and August 2007. A trained health assistant measured children's height and weight. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) cut-off criteria were used to classify the children according to body weight status. Parents completed the Children's Eating Behaviour Questionnaire (CEBQ). A one-way between-groups multivariate analysis of variance was performed to investigate eating behaviour differences by weight status groups while adjusting for sex and neighbourhood socioeconomic status (SES).
Significant differences (p
PubMed ID
20831463 View in PubMed
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Functional food and satiety. Impact of a satiating context effect on appetite control of non-obese men.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature129509
Source
Appetite. 2012 Feb;58(1):354-63
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2012
Author
Hélène Arguin
Marlène Gagnon-Sweeney
Étienne Pigeon
Angelo Tremblay
Author Affiliation
Department of Social and Preventive Medicine, Division of Kinesiology, Laval University, Quebec, QC, Canada G1V 0A6.
Source
Appetite. 2012 Feb;58(1):354-63
Date
Feb-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Appetite Regulation - drug effects
Body Weight
Cross-Over Studies
Eating
Energy intake
Food
Functional Food
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Obesity - prevention & control
Prospective Studies
Quebec
Satiation
Young Adult
Abstract
The aim of this study was to verify if the addition of satiating nutrients and a satiating context effect could influence appetite sensations, spontaneous energy intake and food appreciation under conditions of standardized energy density of a meal. Eighteen non-obese men were submitted to a control, a satiating, and a context effect condition composed of a standardized breakfast and an ad libitum test lunch (macaroni entrée plus chocolate cake). The satiating macaroni contained more proteins, unsaturated fats, fibres and calcium than the control macaroni despite similar energy density, appearance and palatability. In the context effect condition, participants believed they were eating "a highly satiating macaroni", but were served the control macaroni. Appreciation of the macaronis, quantities of macaroni and cake consumed and 4-h satiating potential were measured for each condition. Quantities of macaroni and dessert consumed did not differ between conditions. Satiating potential was greater for the context effect meal compared to the control and/or the satiating meals up to 4h after its consumption. The context effect macaroni obtained higher appreciation rates than the control and the satiating macaronis. The context effect may positively influence the appreciation toward a meal and contribute to increase its satiety potential for many hours.
PubMed ID
22100660 View in PubMed
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Glucagon-like peptide-1 as a treatment option for type 2 diabetes and its role in restoring beta-cell mass.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature46990
Source
Diabetes Technol Ther. 2005 Aug;7(4):651-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2005
Author
B. Gallwitz
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine IV, Eberhard-Karls-University, Otfried-Müller-Strasse 10, D-72076 Tübingen, Germany. baptist.gallwitz@med.uni-tuebingen.de
Source
Diabetes Technol Ther. 2005 Aug;7(4):651-7
Date
Aug-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Amino Acid Sequence
Animals
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 - drug therapy
Glucagon - chemistry - therapeutic use
Glucagon-Like Peptide 1
Humans
Islets of Langerhans - drug effects - pathology
Mice
Models, Biological
Molecular Sequence Data
Peptide Fragments - chemistry - therapeutic use
Protein Precursors - chemistry - therapeutic use
Satiation
Abstract
The "incretin effect" describes the enhanced insulin response from orally ingested glucose compared with intravenous glucose leading to identical postprandial plasma glucose excursions. It makes up to 60% of the postprandial insulin secretion but is diminished in type 2 diabetes. Gastrointestinal hormones promoting the incretin effect are called incretins. Glucagon-like peptide- 1 (GLP-1) is an important incretin. In vitro and animal data have demonstrated that GLP-1 increases beta-cell mass by stimulating islet cell neogenesis and by inhibiting apoptosis of islets. The improvement of beta-cell function can be indirectly observed from the increased insulin secretory capacity of humans receiving GLP-1 or incretin mimetics that act like GLP-1. Furthermore, GLP-1 inhibits glucagon secretion and rarely causes hypoglycemia. It may represent an attractive therapeutic method for type 2 diabetes because of its multiple effects, including a slowing of gastric emptying and the simulation of satiety by acting as a transmitter in the CNS. Native GLP-1 is degraded rapidly upon intravenous or subcutaneous administration and is therefore not feasable for routine therapy. Long-acting GLP-1 analogs (e.g., Liraglutide [Novo Nordisk, Copenhagen, Denmark]) and exenadin-4 (Exenatide [Eli Lilly, Indianapolis, IN]) that are resistant to degradation, called "incretin mimetics," are being investigated in clinical trials. Dipeptidyl peptidase IV inhibitors (e.g., Vildagliptin [Novartis, Basel, Switzerland]) that inhibit the enzyme responsible for incretin degradation are also under study.
PubMed ID
16120042 View in PubMed
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17 records – page 1 of 2.