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365 records – page 1 of 37.

A 1-year evaluation of Syva MicroTrak Chlamydia enzyme immunoassay with selective confirmation by direct fluorescent-antibody assay in a high-volume laboratory.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature217461
Source
J Clin Microbiol. 1994 Sep;32(9):2208-11
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1994
Author
E L Chan
K. Brandt
G B Horsman
Author Affiliation
Laboratory and Disease Control Services, Saskatchewan Health, Regina, Canada.
Source
J Clin Microbiol. 1994 Sep;32(9):2208-11
Date
Sep-1994
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Algorithms
Chlamydia Infections - diagnosis - epidemiology - microbiology
Chlamydia trachomatis - immunology - isolation & purification
Cost Control
Densitometry
Diagnostic Tests, Routine - economics
Evaluation Studies as Topic
Female
Fluorescent Antibody Technique - economics
Humans
Immunoenzyme Techniques - economics
Male
Predictive value of tests
Prevalence
Reagent kits, diagnostic
Saskatchewan - epidemiology
Seasons
Sensitivity and specificity
Urethritis - diagnosis - epidemiology - microbiology
Uterine Cervicitis - diagnosis - epidemiology - microbiology
Abstract
TThe Syva MicroTrak Chlamydia enzyme immunoassay (EIA; Syva Company, San Jose, Calif.) with cytospin and direct fluorescent-antibody assay (DFA) confirmation was evaluated on 43,630 urogenital specimens over a 1-year period in the Provincial Laboratory in Regina, Saskatchewan, Canada. This was a two-phase study intended to define a testing algorithm for Chlamydia trachomatis that would be both highly accurate and cost-effective in our high-volume (> 3,000 tests per month) laboratory. The prevalence of C. trachomatis infection in our population is moderate (8 to 9%). In phase 1, we tested 6,022 male and female urogenital specimens by EIA. All specimens with optical densities above the cutoff value and those within 30% below the cutoff value were retested by DFA. This was 648 specimens (10.8% of the total). A total of 100% (211 of 211) of the specimens with optical densities equal to or greater than 1.00 absorbance unit (AU) above the cutoff value, 98.2% (175 of 178) of the specimens with optical densities of between 0.500 and 0.999 AU above the cutoff value, and 83% (167 of 201) of the specimens with optical densities within 0.499 AU above the cutoff value were confirmed to be positive. A total of 12% (7 of 58) of the specimens with optical densities within 30% below the cutoff value were positive by DFA. In phase 2, we tested 37,608 specimens (32,495 from females; 5,113 from males) by EIA. Only those specimens with optical densities of between 0.499 AU above and 30% below the cutoff value required confirmation on the basis of data from phase 1 of the study. This was 4.5% of all specimens tested. This decrease in the proportion of specimens requiring confirmation provides a significant cost savings to the laboratory. The testing algorithm gives us a 1-day turnaround time to the final confirmed test results. The MicroTrak EIA performed very well in both phases of the study, with a sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value of 96.1, 99.1, 90.3, and 99.7%, respectively, in phase 2. We suggest that for laboratories that use EIA for Chlamydia testing, a study such as this one will identify an appropriate optical density range for confirmatory testing for samples from that particular population.
Notes
Cites: Epidemiol Rev. 1983;5:96-1236357824
Cites: J Clin Microbiol. 1993 Jun;31(6):1646-78315010
Cites: Diagn Microbiol Infect Dis. 1992 Nov-Dec;15(8):663-81478048
Cites: J Clin Microbiol. 1990 Nov;28(11):2473-62254422
PubMed ID
7814548 View in PubMed
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Across-province standardization and comparative analysis of time-to-care intervals for cancer.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature160988
Source
BMC Cancer. 2007;7:186
Publication Type
Article
Date
2007
Author
Marcy Winget
Donna Turner
Jon Tonita
Charlotte King
Zoann Nugent
Riaz Alvi
Richard Barss
Author Affiliation
Medical Affairs and Community Oncology, Alberta Cancer Board, 10123-99 Street, Edmonton, Alberta, T5J 3H1, Canada. marcywin@cancerboard.ab.ca
Source
BMC Cancer. 2007;7:186
Date
2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alberta - epidemiology
Colorectal Neoplasms - diagnosis - epidemiology - therapy
Delivery of Health Care - standards - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Lung Neoplasms - diagnosis - epidemiology - therapy
Manitoba - epidemiology
National Health Programs - standards - utilization
Neoplasms - diagnosis - epidemiology - therapy
Saskatchewan - epidemiology
Time Factors
Waiting Lists
Abstract
A set of consistent, standardized definitions of intervals and populations on which to report across provinces is needed to inform the Provincial/Territorial Deputy Ministries of Health on progress of the Ten-Year Plan to Strengthen Health Care. The objectives of this project were to: 1) identify a set of criteria and variables needed to create comparable measures of important time-to-cancer-care intervals that could be applied across provinces and 2) use the measures to compare time-to-care across participating provinces for lung and colorectal cancer patients diagnosed in 2004.
A broad-based group of stakeholders from each of the three participating cancer agencies was assembled to identify criteria for time-to-care intervals to standardize, evaluate possible intervals and their corresponding start and end time points, and finalize the selection of intervals to pursue. Inclusion/exclusion criteria were identified for the patient population and the selected time points to reduce potential selection bias. The provincial 2004 colorectal and lung cancer data were used to illustrate across-province comparisons for the selected time-to-care intervals.
Criteria identified as critical for time-to-care intervals and corresponding start and end points were: 1) relevant to patients, 2) relevant to clinical care, 3) unequivocally defined, and 4) currently captured consistently across cancer agencies. Time from diagnosis to first radiation or chemotherapy treatment and the smaller components, time from diagnosis to first consult with an oncologist and time from first consult to first radiation or chemotherapy treatment, were the only intervals that met all four criteria. Timeliness of care for the intervals evaluated was similar between the provinces for lung cancer patients but significant differences were found for colorectal cancer patients.
We identified criteria important for selecting time-to-care intervals and appropriate inclusion criteria that were robust across the agencies that did not result in an overly selective sample of patients to be compared. Comparisons of data across three provinces of the selected time-to-care intervals identified several important differences related to treatment and access that require further attention. Expanding this collaboration across Canada would facilitate improvement of and equitable access to quality cancer care at a national level.
Notes
Cites: CMAJ. 2001 Aug 21;165(4):421-511531050
Cites: BMC Health Serv Res. 2001;1:311319944
Cites: Int J Radiat Oncol Biol Phys. 1994 Aug 30;30(1):221-88083117
Cites: Can J Surg. 2005 Apr;48(2):137-4215887794
Cites: Int J Radiat Oncol Biol Phys. 1995 May 15;32(2):531-97751195
Cites: CMAJ. 1998 Jun 30;158(13):1735-409676551
Cites: BMJ. 1999 Jun 5;318(7197):150710355993
Cites: CMAJ. 1995 Feb 1;152(3):398-97828105
PubMed ID
17916257 View in PubMed
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Actinic prurigo: clinical features and prognosis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature223861
Source
J Am Acad Dermatol. 1992 May;26(5 Pt 1):683-92
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-1992
Author
P R Lane
D J Hogan
M J Martel
B. Reeder
J. Irvine
Author Affiliation
Division of Dermatology, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, Canada.
Source
J Am Acad Dermatol. 1992 May;26(5 Pt 1):683-92
Date
May-1992
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Analysis of Variance
Child
Child, Preschool
Female
Humans
Indians, North American - statistics & numerical data
Male
Middle Aged
Photosensitivity Disorders - diagnosis - epidemiology
Prognosis
Prurigo - diagnosis - epidemiology
Questionnaires
Saskatchewan - epidemiology
Sunlight - adverse effects
Abstract
Actinic prurigo, an idiopathic familial photodermatosis, has been described in Amerindians in Manitoba, Canada, as well as in the United States, Mexico, and South America.
Our purpose was to describe the clinical features and prognosis of actinic prurigo in Amerindians in Saskatchewan, Canada.
Clinical examinations, questionnaires, phototesting, and laboratory tests were used.
We present a series of 93 Amerindian patients. The face is the most commonly involved area. A hereditary tendency, cheilitis, and pruritus are prominent features. One third of patients report some lesions, often minor, during the winter. The majority of patients phototested were sensitive to ultraviolet A light.
We find the age of onset of actinic prurigo to be the most important feature in determining the type of eruption and the prognosis for the patient. In general the younger ages of onset (up to 20 years of age) are associated with cheilitis and more acute eruptions and are more likely to improve over 5 years. Those who develop actinic prurigo as adults (21 years of age and older) tend to have a milder and more persistent dermatosis.
Notes
Comment In: J Am Acad Dermatol. 1997 Mar;36(3 Pt 1):504-59091504
PubMed ID
1583166 View in PubMed
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Advertising and alcohol sales: a legal impact study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature225489
Source
J Stud Alcohol. 1991 Nov;52(6):555-67
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-1991
Author
C R Makowsky
P C Whitehead
Author Affiliation
Health Services and Promotion Branch, Health and Welfare Canada, Ottawa, Canada.
Source
J Stud Alcohol. 1991 Nov;52(6):555-67
Date
Nov-1991
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Advertising as Topic - legislation & jurisprudence
Alcohol Drinking - epidemiology - prevention & control
Alcoholic Beverages - economics - supply & distribution
Alcoholism - prevention & control
Cross-Sectional Studies
Humans
Incidence
Public Policy
Saskatchewan - epidemiology
Abstract
According to the single distribution theory increases in the availability of alcoholic beverages in the general population are associated with increases in average consumption and increases in alcohol-related damage. If it can be demonstrated that advertising contributes to availability, perhaps in the form of what has been called social or subjective availability, then advertising could be considered an appropriate target of prevention. A 58-year ban on advertising of alcoholic beverages was lifted in Saskatchewan in 1983. Data on monthly sales of beer, wine and distilled spirits were examined for the years 1981 to 1987. Box-Jenkins time series techniques were used to estimate the statistical relationship between the policy change and volume of sales of alcoholic beverages. The results revealed that sales of beer increased and sales of spirits decreased following the change in legislation that permitted alcohol advertising in Saskatchewan. The main finding is that there was no impact on wine and total alcohol sales from the introduction of alcohol advertising. Alcohol advertising may have produced a substitution effect with respect to beer and spirits, but this was not predicted. This evaluation suggests that alcohol advertising is not a contributory force that influences the overall level of alcohol consumption. The place of advertising in the single distribution theory remains not proven, and the place of advertising as an instrument of public policy with respect to the prevention of alcohol-related damage remains in question.
PubMed ID
1758183 View in PubMed
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Age-related association between body mass index and blood pressure: the Humboldt Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature213939
Source
Int J Obes Relat Metab Disord. 1995 Nov;19(11):825-31
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-1995
Author
Y. Chen
D C Rennie
B A Reeder
Author Affiliation
Centre for Agricultural Medicine, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, Canada.
Source
Int J Obes Relat Metab Disord. 1995 Nov;19(11):825-31
Date
Nov-1995
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aging - physiology
Animals
Blood Pressure - physiology
Body mass index
Body Weight - physiology
Child
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Humans
Hypertension - epidemiology - physiopathology
Linear Models
Male
Middle Aged
Prevalence
Saskatchewan - epidemiology
Abstract
To investigate how age modifies the relation between body mass and blood pressure.
Community based cross-sectional study.
2865 residents aged 6 to 74 years (85.6% of the target population) in the town of Humboldt, Saskatchewan, Canada.
Body mass index [weight (kg)/height (meters)2], and diastolic and systolic blood pressures.
Among the subjects, 99.6% were of Caucasian origin. With both sexes, there was a stronger relation between body mass index and diastolic blood pressure in younger age groups than older age groups. In males, the increase in mean blood pressure for a 1-unit increase in body mass index (kg/m2) was 0.72, 0.72, 0.41 and 0.47 mm Hg in the 6-14, 15-34, 35-54 and 55-74 year age groups respectively. In females, the correspondent increase was 0.95, 0.57, 0.46 and 0.43 mm Hg. In females, age also modified the relation between body mass index and the prevalence of high blood pressure. The odds ratios for high blood pressure for a 1-unit increase in body mass index in females was 1.33, 1.21, 1.12 and 1.10 in the 6-14, 15-34, 35-54 and 55-74 year age groups.
Age significantly modifies the relations of body mass index with mean diastolic blood pressure in both sexes, and with the prevalence of high blood pressure in females. The relations are stronger in children and young adults than in older persons.
PubMed ID
8589786 View in PubMed
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Air pollution and childhood respiratory health: exposure to sulfate and ozone in 10 Canadian rural communities.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature217580
Source
Environ Res. 1994 Aug;66(2):125-42
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-1994
Author
B R Stern
M E Raizenne
R T Burnett
L. Jones
J. Kearney
C A Franklin
Author Affiliation
Environmental Health Directorate, Health Canada, Ottawa, Ontario.
Source
Environ Res. 1994 Aug;66(2):125-42
Date
Aug-1994
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Air Pollutants - analysis
Child
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Humans
Lung - physiology
Lung Diseases - epidemiology
Male
Ontario - epidemiology
Ozone - analysis
Questionnaires
Rural Population
Saskatchewan - epidemiology
Sulfates - analysis
Abstract
This study was designed to examine differences in the respiratory health status of preadolescent school children, aged 7-11 years, who resided in 10 rural Canadian communities areas of moderate and low exposure to regional sulfate and ozone pollution. Five of the communities were located in central Saskatchewan, a low-exposure region, and five were located in southwestern Ontario, an area with moderately elevated exposures resulting from long-range atmospheric transport of polluted air masses. In this cross-sectional study, the child's respiratory symptoms and illness history were evaluated using a parent-completed questionnaire, administered in September 1985. Respiratory function was assessed once for each child in the schools between October 1985 and March 1986, by the measurement of pulmonary function for forced vital capacity (FVC), forced expiratory volume in 1 sec (FEV1.0), peak expiratory flow rate (PEFR), mean forced expiratory flow rate during the middle half of the FVC curve (FEF25-75), and maximal expiratory flow at 50% of the expired vital capacity (V50max). The 1986 annual mean of the 1-hr daily maxima of ozone was higher in Ontario (46.3 ppb) than in Saskatchewan (34.1 ppb), with 90th percentile concentrations of 80 ppb in Ontario and 47 ppb in Saskatchewan. Summertime 1-hr daily maxima means were 69.0 ppb in Ontario and 36.1 ppb in Saskatchewan. Annual mean and 90th percentile concentrations of inhalable sulfates were three times higher in Ontario than in Saskatchewan; there were no significant differences in levels of inhalable particles (PM10) or particulate nitrates. Levels of sulfur dioxide (SO2) and nitrogen dioxide (NO2) were low in both regions. After controlling for the effects of age, sex, parental smoking, parental education, and gas cooking, no significant regional differences were observed in rates of chronic cough or phlegm, persistent wheeze, current asthma, bronchitis in the past year, or any chest illness that kept the child at home for 3 or more consecutive days during the previous year. Children living in southwestern Ontario had statistically significant (P 0.05).
PubMed ID
8055835 View in PubMed
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Alpha-synuclein polymorphisms are associated with Parkinson's disease in a Saskatchewan population.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature147557
Source
Mov Disord. 2009 Dec 15;24(16):2411-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-15-2009
Author
Alex Rajput
Carles Vilariño-Güell
Michele L Rajput
Owen A Ross
Alexandra I Soto-Ortolaza
Sarah J Lincoln
Stephanie A Cobb
Michael G Heckman
Matthew J Farrer
Ali Rajput
Author Affiliation
Division of Neurology, University of Saskatchewan and Saskatoon Health Region, Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada.
Source
Mov Disord. 2009 Dec 15;24(16):2411-4
Date
Dec-15-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age of Onset
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Case-Control Studies
Female
Gene Frequency
Genetic Predisposition to Disease
Genotype
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Mutation - genetics
Odds Ratio
Parkinson Disease - genetics
Saskatchewan - epidemiology - ethnology
alpha-Synuclein - genetics
Abstract
Alpha-synuclein gene (SNCA) mutations cause familial Parkinsonism but the role of SNCA variability in idiopathic Parkinson's disease (PD) remains incompletely defined. We report a study of SNCA genetic variation in 452 idiopathic PD cases and 245 controls. SNCA copy number mutations were not associated with early-onset disease in this population. The minor allele "G" at rs356165 was associated with increased odds of PD (P = 0.013) and genetic variation in D4S3481 (Rep1) was associated with age of disease onset (P = 0.007). There was a trend toward association between variation at rs2583988 and rapid PD progression.
PubMed ID
19890971 View in PubMed
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An association of maternal age and birth weight with end-stage renal disease in Saskatchewan. Sub-analysis of registered Indians and those with diabetes.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature183335
Source
Am J Nephrol. 2003 Nov-Dec;23(6):395-402
Publication Type
Article
Author
Roland Dyck
Helena Klomp
Leonard Tan
Mary Rose Stang
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine and Community Health, University of Saskatchewan, and Population Health Branch, Saskatchewan, Canada. dyck@sask.usask.ca
Source
Am J Nephrol. 2003 Nov-Dec;23(6):395-402
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Birth weight
Case-Control Studies
Female
Humans
Infant, Low Birth Weight
Infant, Newborn
Kidney Failure, Chronic - epidemiology
Male
Maternal Age
Multivariate Analysis
Odds Ratio
Parity
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Complications
Saskatchewan - epidemiology
Abstract
To determine links between birth related factors and end-stage renal disease (ESRD).
This 1:3 age, sex, and source population (registered Indians [SkRI] and other Saskatchewan people [OSkP]) matched case-control study, compared maternal age and parity, gestational age, low birth weight (LBW), and high birth weight (HBW), between subjects with and without ESRD.
Of 1,162 subjects, 277 cases (48 SkRI and 229 OSkP) and 601 controls (112 SkRI and 489 OSkP) had birth weight information. A trend for increased LBW rates occurred among SkRI and OSkP cases compared to controls (10.4 vs. 5.3% and 6.6 vs. 4.3%), and was significant for OSkP female cases (OR 3.66; 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.05, 12.73). Higher HBW rates occurred in SkRI cases (14.6% compared to 11.6% controls; N/S), and 3/5 female SkRI diabetic ESRD (DESRD) cases were over 3,750 g compared to 1/14 controls (p /=30 years was an independent predictor for ESRD, particularly for OSkP non-DESRD cases (OR 2.45; 95% CI 1.03, 5.8). Cases with older mothers had lower mean birth weights than controls (3,236 vs. 3,434 g; p = 0.005).
Older maternal age may predispose offspring to ESRD through mechanisms that differ for DESRD versus non-DESRD, and that may relate to ethnicity.
PubMed ID
14555863 View in PubMed
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An evaluation of Think First Saskatchewan: a head and spinal cord injury prevention program.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature186006
Source
Can J Public Health. 2003 Mar-Apr;94(2):115-20
Publication Type
Article
Author
Marni L Wesner
Author Affiliation
University of Alberta Glen Sather Sport Medicine Clinic. mwesner@ualberta.ca
Source
Can J Public Health. 2003 Mar-Apr;94(2):115-20
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adolescent Behavior
Child
Child Behavior
Craniocerebral Trauma - epidemiology - prevention & control
Dangerous Behavior
Female
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Humans
Male
Program Evaluation
Questionnaires
Risk factors
Risk-Taking
Saskatchewan - epidemiology
School Health Services
Spinal Injuries - epidemiology - prevention & control
Abstract
To identify youth behaviour with regards to injury prevention, to assess the awareness of severity and susceptibility to brain and spinal cord injury, and to evaluate the impact of the Think First Saskatchewan school visit program on students' knowledge of brain and spinal cord injury prevention.
A controlled, pre- and post-test design, self-report questionnaire was administered to 1,257 grade 6 and 7 students. Descriptive statistics and chi-square were used for data analysis. P-values less than 0.05 were considered significant.
Saskatchewan youth participate in activities that put them at risk for brain and spinal cord injury. The Think First Saskatchewan school visit program statistically improved self-reported knowledge of the students receiving the Think First message.
Think First Saskatchewan is a brain and spinal cord injury prevention program that significantly improves youth knowledge pertaining to injury prevention. Further evaluation of the program to include a more delayed survey of retention of knowledge, changes to behaviour, and reduction of brain and spinal cord injury are necessary.
PubMed ID
12675167 View in PubMed
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An outbreak of trichinellosis due to consumption of bear meat infected with Trichinella nativa, in 2 northern Saskatchewan communities.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature30741
Source
J Infect Dis. 2003 Sep 15;188(6):835-43
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-15-2003
Author
Roberta S Schellenberg
Ben J K Tan
James D Irvine
Donna R Stockdale
Alvin A Gajadhar
Bouchra Serhir
Juri Botha
Cheryl A Armstrong
Shirley A Woods
Joseph M Blondeau
Tammy L McNab
Author Affiliation
Department of Internal Medicine, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada. r.schellenberg@shaw.ca.
Source
J Infect Dis. 2003 Sep 15;188(6):835-43
Date
Sep-15-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Albendazole - therapeutic use
Animals
Anti-Inflammatory Agents - therapeutic use
Antinematodal Agents - therapeutic use
Child
Child, Preschool
Disease Outbreaks
Female
Food Contamination
Humans
Infant
Male
Meat - parasitology
Mebendazole - therapeutic use
Middle Aged
Prednisone - therapeutic use
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Complications, Parasitic - drug therapy - epidemiology - parasitology
Saskatchewan - epidemiology
Treatment Outcome
Trichinella - growth & development - isolation & purification
Trichinosis - drug therapy - epidemiology - parasitology
Ursidae - parasitology
Abstract
In June 2000, bear meat infected with Trichinella nativa was consumed by 78 individuals in 2 northern Saskatchewan communities. Interviews and blood collections were performed on exposed individuals at the onset of the outbreak and 7 weeks later. All exposed individuals were treated with mebendazole or albendazole, and symptomatic patients received prednisone. Confirmed cases were more likely to have consumed dried meat, rather than boiled meat (P
PubMed ID
12964114 View in PubMed
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365 records – page 1 of 37.