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[Application of administrative enforcement while carrying-out of federal sanitary and epidemiological surveillance in the Armed Forces of the Russian Federation].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature107552
Source
Voen Med Zh. 2013 May;334(5):19-23
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2013
Author
A E Zobov
O V Berskii
V N Nebredovskii
D A Zharkov
Source
Voen Med Zh. 2013 May;334(5):19-23
Date
May-2013
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Epidemiological Monitoring
Female
Humans
Male
Military Medicine - legislation & jurisprudence - organization & administration - standards
Military Personnel
Russia
Sanitation - methods - standards
Abstract
The article deals with the legal framework of an application of administrative enforcement. The authors analyzed the information about a quantity and structure of administrative violation in the sanitary and epidemiological welfare, revealed during 2009-2011 while carrying-out of federal sanitary and epidemiological surveillance by the Center for Sanitary and Epidemiological Supervision of the Ministry of Defense (TsGSEN MF RF) in military units and organizations of the Armed Forces of the Russian Federation, and applied administrative sanctions. The acquired data was compared with the same data acquired by The Federal Service for Supervision of Consumer Rights Protection and Human Well-Being (Rospotrebnadzor). The results of research give a reason to consider TsGSEN MF activity according to index of application of administrative enforcement as ineffective. It shows the significant underestimate of administrative sanctions for the failure to comply with requirements of the health legislation. The authors formulated practical recommendations for activation of legal mechanics application by the specialists of TsGSEN MF RF while carrying-out of federal sanitary and epidemiological surveillance in the Armed Forces of the Russian Federation.
PubMed ID
24000618 View in PubMed
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[Current status and aspects of solving issues of sanitary and epidemiological well-being at the facilities of railway transport in Russia].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature118053
Source
Gig Sanit. 2012 Sep-Oct;(5):37-40
Publication Type
Article
Author
Iu N Kas'kov
Iu I Podkrytov
Source
Gig Sanit. 2012 Sep-Oct;(5):37-40
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Humans
Hygiene
Morbidity - trends
Occupational Diseases - epidemiology
Occupational Health - standards
Personal Satisfaction
Railroads
Retrospective Studies
Russia - epidemiology
Sanitation - methods - standards
Abstract
An analysis of modern sanitary-epidemiological status of railway transport is presented. The mean index of occupational morbidity in railway transport workers in recent years is 1.2 cases per 10 thousand railway workers. Workers of locomotive brigades (locomotive drivers and their assistants), in whom occupational sensorineural hearing loss was predominantly revealed (78.3 +/- 3.4%) accounted for 30-40% of cases out of the total number of occupational morbidity in railway transport workers. Water samples from the sources of centralized and noncentralized water supply did not meet health standards for microbiological parameters in the 14-18%, and from the water pipes in 4-6% of cases. Suggestions for improving sanitary-hygiene monitoring in railway transport have been given.
PubMed ID
23243716 View in PubMed
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Food and water security issues in Russia II: water security in general population of Russian Arctic, Siberia and Far East, 2000-2011.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature105571
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2013;72:22646
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
Author
Alexey A Dudarev
Eugenia V Dushkina
Yuliya N Sladkova
Pavel R Alloyarov
Valery S Chupakhin
Vitaliy M Dorofeyev
Tatjana A Kolesnikova
Kirill B Fridman
Birgitta Evengard
Lena M Nilsson
Author Affiliation
Northwest Public Health Research Center, St. Petersburg, Russia.
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2013;72:22646
Date
2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Arctic Regions
Drinking
Drinking Water - analysis - microbiology
Far East
Humans
Russia
Sanitation - methods - standards
Sewage - analysis
Siberia
Water Microbiology
Water Pollutants - analysis
Water Pollution - analysis - statistics & numerical data
Water Quality - standards
Water Supply - analysis - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
Poor state of water supply systems, shortage of water purification facilities and disinfection systems, low quality of drinking water generally in Russia and particularly in the regions of the Russian Arctic, Siberia and Far East have been defined in the literature. However, no standard protocol of water security assessment has been used in the majority of studies.
Uniform water security indicators collected from Russian official statistical sources for the period 2000-2011 were used for comparison for 18 selected regions in the Russian Arctic, Siberia and Far East. The following indicators of water security were analyzed: water consumption, chemical and biological contamination of water reservoirs of Categories I and II of water sources (centralized--underground and surface, and non-centralized) and of drinking water.
Water consumption in selected regions fluctuated from 125 to 340 L/person/day. Centralized water sources (both underground and surface sources) are highly contaminated by chemicals (up to 40-80%) and biological agents (up to 55% in some regions), mainly due to surface water sources. Underground water sources show relatively low levels of biological contamination, while chemical contamination is high due to additional water contamination during water treatment and transportation in pipelines. Non-centralized water sources are highly contaminated (both chemically and biologically) in 32-90% of samples analyzed. Very high levels of chemical contamination of drinking water (up to 51%) were detected in many regions, mainly in the north-western part of the Russian Arctic. Biological contamination of drinking water was generally much lower (2.5-12%) everywhere except Evenki AO (27%), and general and thermotolerant coliform bacteria predominated in drinking water samples from all regions (up to 17.5 and 12.5%, correspondingly). The presence of other agents was much lower: Coliphages--0.2-2.7%, Clostridia spores, Giardia cysts, pathogenic bacteria, Rotavirus--up to 0.8%. Of a total of 56 chemical pollutants analyzed in water samples from centralized water supply systems, 32 pollutants were found to be in excess of hygienic limits, with the predominant pollutants being Fe (up to 55%), Cl (up to 57%), Al (up to 43%) and Mn (up to 45%).
In 18 selected regions of the Russian Arctic, Siberia and Far East Category I and II water reservoirs, water sources (centralized--underground, surface; non-centralized) and drinking water are highly contaminated by chemical and biological agents. Full-scale reform of the Russian water industry and water security system is urgently needed, especially in selected regions.
Notes
Cites: Gig Sanit. 2008 May-Jun;(3):16-818590142
Cites: Int J Circumpolar Health. 2013;72. doi: 10.3402/ijch.v72i0.2153023940840
Cites: Appl Environ Microbiol. 2000 Apr;66(4):1724-510742269
Cites: Gig Sanit. 2008 Sep-Oct;(5):32-419086221
Cites: Gig Sanit. 2000 May-Jun;(3):17-910900788
Cites: Gig Sanit. 2011 May-Jun;(3):91-521842746
Cites: Gig Sanit. 2011 May-Jun;(3):10-521842728
Cites: Water Res. 2012 Mar 15;46(4):921-3322209280
PubMed ID
24350065 View in PubMed
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Health hazards in areas of military operations conducted in different climatic and sanitary conditions.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature101719
Source
Int Marit Health. 2011;62(1):41-62
Publication Type
Article
Date
2011
Author
Krzysztof Korzeniewski
Author Affiliation
Military Institute of Medicine, Department of Epidemiology and Tropical Medicine, Gdynia, Poland. kktropmed@wp.pl
Source
Int Marit Health. 2011;62(1):41-62
Date
2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Climate
Combat Disorders - epidemiology
Humans
Military Medicine - methods - statistics & numerical data
Military Personnel - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Occupational Diseases - epidemiology - etiology - microbiology
Sanitation - methods - standards
Stress, Psychological - epidemiology
Wounds and Injuries - epidemiology
Abstract
This paper reviews the most common health hazards occurring among personnel of peacekeeping and stabilization missions functioning within armed conflicts in the contemporary world. Military operations have been executed in diverse climatic and sanitary conditions, which are frequently unfamiliar for their participants. Some of them, e.g. the UN peacekeeping missions in the Middle East (Lebanon, the Golan Heights), have been carried out in a relatively stable geopolitical environment; whereas, stabilization missions in Iraq and Afghanistan, which are actually combat activities, undoubtedly fall into the group of the most perilous military operations in the world. Hot or cold climate, poor sanitary and hygienic conditions along with warfare facilitate the occurrence of numerous diseases and body injuries not only among the local people but also among peacekeepers, who represent the population of immigrants. Health hazards which pose major epidemiological threats in combat zones are arthropod-borne, food and water-borne, respiratory tract diseases, sexually transmitted diseases, enzootic diseases, battle injuries, and non- -battle injuries, e.g. traffic accidents. Another considerable health problem are psychiatric disorders, which can either appear directly after the occurrence of a traumatic event in a combat zone or indirectly, after some time had elapsed. In addition to the health hazards listed above, environmental factors such as changeable weather conditions and local fauna may also be life threatening.
PubMed ID
21534225 View in PubMed
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[Modern problems of the application of sanitary regulations concerning sanitary protection zones and sanitary classification of enterprises, buildings and other facilities].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature104741
Source
Gig Sanit. 2013 Nov-Dec;(6):93-7
Publication Type
Article
Author
A Iu Lomtev
G B Eremin
N A Mozzhukhina
M Iu Kombarova
A V Mel'tser
É Iu Giul'mamedov
Source
Gig Sanit. 2013 Nov-Dec;(6):93-7
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Building Codes - methods - standards
Construction Industry - standards
Environmental Health - legislation & jurisprudence - standards
Environmental Monitoring - legislation & jurisprudence - methods
Government Regulation
Humans
Public Sector - standards
Russia
Sanitary Engineering
Sanitation - methods - standards
Abstract
In this paper there was performed an analysis of the application of sanitary norms and rules concerning sanitary protective zones and sanitary classification of enterprises, buildings and other facilities, including requirements for the sufficiency and accuracy of information in the performance of projects in sanitary protection zone (SPZ). There is presented an analysis of regulations that set requirements for implementation of mapping works in drafting the SPZ. The design of the SPZ was shown to be, on the one hand, the element of territorial planning subjects of the Russian Federation, on the other hand, the object of capital construction. The substantiations of requirements for graphic and text content, structure, and composition of data, sources of their obtaining, methods of data convergence are reported. There are revealed inconsistencies in Sanitary Regulations and Norms (SanPins) and in their relationship with the Town Planning and Land Code and other laws, and regulations adopted in their development.
PubMed ID
24624833 View in PubMed
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Neglected diseases of neglected populations: thinking to reshape the determinants of health in Latin America and the Caribbean.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature171974
Source
BMC Public Health. 2005;5:119
Publication Type
Article
Date
2005
Author
John P Ehrenberg
Steven K Ault
Author Affiliation
Area of Disease Prevention and Control, Pan American Health Organization/World Health Organization, Washington, DC 20037, USA. ehrenbej@paho.org
Source
BMC Public Health. 2005;5:119
Date
2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Bacterial Infections - prevention & control
Caribbean Region - epidemiology
Communicable Disease Control - methods - organization & administration
Developing Countries
Disease Vectors
Humans
Insect control
Interinstitutional Relations
Latin America - epidemiology
Medically underserved area
Organizational Innovation
Parasitic Diseases - prevention & control
Poverty
Rodent Control
Sanitation - methods - standards
Virus Diseases - prevention & control
Vulnerable Populations
Abstract
People living in poverty throughout the developing world are heavily burdened with neglected communicable diseases and often marginalized by the health sector. These diseases are currently referred to as Neglected Diseases of Neglected Populations. The neglected diseases create social and financial burdens to the individual, the family, the community, and the nation.
Numerous studies of successful individual interventions to manage communicable disease determinants in various types of communities have been published, but few have applied multiple interventions in an integrated, coordinated manner. We have identified a series of successful interventions and developed three hypothetical scenarios where such interventions could be applied in an integrated, multi-disease, inter-programmatic, and/or inter-sectoral approach for prevention and control of neglected diseases in three different populations: a slum, an indigenous community, and a city with a mix of populations.
The objective of this paper is to identify new opportunities to address neglected diseases, improve community health and promote sustainable development in neglected populations by highlighting examples of key risk and protective factors for neglected diseases which can be managed and implemented through multi-disease-based, integrated, inter-programmatic, and/or inter-sectoral approaches. Based on a literature review, analysis and development of scenarios we visualize how multiple interventions could manage multiple disease problems and propose these as possible strategies to be tested. We seek to stimulate intra- and inter-sectoral dialogue which will help in the construction of new strategies for neglected diseases (particularly for the parasitic diseases) which could benefit the poor and marginalized based on the principle of sustainability and understanding of key determinants of health, and lead to the establishment of pilot projects and activities which can contribute to the achievement of the Millennium Development Goals.
Notes
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PubMed ID
16283932 View in PubMed
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[Results of parasitological passportization of sewage treatment works in the South Federal District].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature127299
Source
Med Parazitol (Mosk). 2011 Oct-Dec;(4):45-8
Publication Type
Article
Author
E P Khromenkova
Iu I Vaserin
L L Dimidova
A V Upyrev
Source
Med Parazitol (Mosk). 2011 Oct-Dec;(4):45-8
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Disease Reservoirs - parasitology
Disinfection - methods - standards
Humans
Parasite Egg Count
Quality Control
Russia
Sanitary Engineering - methods
Sanitation - methods - standards
Sewage - parasitology
Abstract
Developed parasitological passports for sewage treatment works have been issued in the subjects of the Southern Federal District. Its some regions have areas inadequately covered by centralized water drainage. New waste treatment technologies and disinvasion agents have not been virtually introduced. No proper significance is attached to the parasitological studies of epidemiologically significant substrates, such as waste waters and their sludge. The positive results of dehelmintization and disinvasion are stated from the absence of helminth eggs rather than from the comparative results of sewer clearing from the invasion principle and their viability loss. Standard guides corresponding to the profile of objects are inadequately used in day-to-day work.
PubMed ID
22308716 View in PubMed
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[Strategic approaches to risk management to reduce human vulnerability due to water factor changes].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature143399
Source
Gig Sanit. 2010 Mar-Apr;(2):8-13
Publication Type
Article
Author
Iu A Rakhmanin
O D Doronina
Source
Gig Sanit. 2010 Mar-Apr;(2):8-13
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Humans
Risk Assessment - organization & administration
Russia
Sanitation - methods - standards
Vulnerable Populations
Water Pollution - prevention & control
Water Purification - standards
Water Supply - standards
Abstract
The current globalization tendencies give rise to serious human health risks associated with the problems in providing the safety of water resources, with their intense microbiological contamination due to sewage disposal, with the loss of capacity of water ecosystems for self-repair. To guarantee access to safe drinking water and basic sanitary services is considered to be one of the most priority tasks of the international community, which are embodied in the Plan of Implementation of the World Summit on Sustainable Development approved by the United Nations Organization.
PubMed ID
20491262 View in PubMed
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[Substantiation for sanitary and hygienic measures to prevent nosocomial pyoseptic infections].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature135050
Source
Gig Sanit. 2011 Jan-Feb;(1):42-4
Publication Type
Article
Author
A A Kuzin
Source
Gig Sanit. 2011 Jan-Feb;(1):42-4
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Cross Infection - microbiology - prevention & control
Humans
Hygiene - standards
Infection control - methods - standards
Russia
Sanitation - methods - standards
Sepsis - microbiology - prevention & control
Suppuration
Surgery Department, Hospital - standards
Abstract
Nosocomial pyoseptic infections are one of the topical problems of the practical activity of surgical hospitals. Their occurrence is due to the influence of risk factors associated with patients' condition, a therapeutic and diagnostic process, and the hospital environment. A package of measures for the prevention of infectious complications comprises the sanitary-and-antiepidemic measures, its one component being sanitary-and-hygienic ones. The diagnosis of the epidemiological features of nosocomial infections allows the basic and additional sanitary-and- hygienic measures to be identified, differentiated, and rationalized depending on the categories of patients and the types of units with varying morbidity rates.
PubMed ID
21513059 View in PubMed
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[Ways of urban sanitary and epidemiological well-being management]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature96865
Source
Gig Sanit. 2010 Mar-Apr;(2):21-6
Publication Type
Article
Author
M A Kreimer
Source
Gig Sanit. 2010 Mar-Apr;(2):21-6
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Environmental Illness - epidemiology - prevention & control
Environmental Monitoring - methods
Health status
Humans
Incidence
Public Health - standards
Quality of Life
Risk factors
Sanitation - methods - standards
Siberia - epidemiology
Abstract
The scientific rationale for preventive measures based on sanitary-and-epidemiological surveillance on environmental objects is considered. The sizes of functional zones and space for various types of communal services and amenities and leisure are regulated to ensure good urban vital activities. Multistorey housing causes an increase in the number of negative factors per area units and in their impact on health. A proposal has been made for the standardization of the ranges of urban population upsurge and size, by using the sanitary-and-hygienic rules and norms rather than climatic parameters. A criterion system for assessing the data of statistical observations has been substantiated and 5 levels of analysis and managerial decision-making have been proposed. Cause-and-effect relations may be determined for the parameters of the second level; models of program-oriented studies for the third level, only sanitary-and-epidemiological surveillance is possible for the fourth and fifth levels. The space planning scheme must provide for water supply reserves, generation areas for pure air coming into the town, and waste disposal areas. The general layout may use statistical observation parameters characterizing the second level of occurrence of negative phenomena. The statistical observation parameters characterizing the third and fourth levels of occurrence of negative phenomena may be used for municipal improvements and sanitary maintenance. These characterizing the fourth and fifth level may be used for prevention in therapeutic-and-prophylactic institutions.
PubMed ID
20496488 View in PubMed
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10 records – page 1 of 1.