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384 records – page 1 of 39.

[Academician of the RAS, MD, PhD, DSc, Professor G G Onishchenko (the 65th anniversary)].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature270120
Source
Gig Sanit. 2015;94(8):83
Publication Type
Article
Date
2015

Access to water in the countries of the former Soviet Union.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature76288
Source
Public Health. 2006 Apr;120(4):364-72
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2006
Author
M. McKee
D. Balabanova
K. Akingbade
J. Pomerleau
A. Stickley
R. Rose
C. Haerpfer
Author Affiliation
European Centre on Health of Societies in Transition & Health System Development Programme, School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, University of London, London WC1E 7HT, UK. martin.mckee@lshtm.ac.uk
Source
Public Health. 2006 Apr;120(4):364-72
Date
Apr-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Rural Population
Sanitation - statistics & numerical data
USSR
Urban Population
Water Supply - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
BACKGROUND: During the Soviet period, authorities in the USSR invested heavily in collective farming and modernization of living conditions in rural areas. However, many problems remained, including poor access to many basic amenities such as water. Since then, the situation is likely to have changed; economic decline has coincided with migration and widening social inequalities, potentially increasing disparities within and between countries. AIM: To examine access to water and sanitation and its determinants in urban and rural areas of eight former Soviet countries. METHODS: A series of nationally representative surveys in Armenia, Belarus, Georgia, Moldova, Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, Russia and Ukraine was undertaken in 2001, covering 18,428 individuals (aged 18+ years). RESULTS: The percentage of respondents living in rural areas varied between 27 and 59% among countries. There are wide urban-rural differences in access to amenities. Even in urban areas, only about 90% of respondents had access to cold running water in their home (60% in Kyrgyzstan). In rural areas, less than one-third had cold running water in their homes (44% in Russia, under 10% in Kyrgyzstan and Moldova). Between one-third and one-half of rural respondents in some countries (such as Belarus, Kazakhstan and Moldova) obtained their water from wells and similar sources. Access to hot running water inside the homes was an exception in rural households, reflecting the lack of modern heating methods in villages. Similarly, indoor access to toilets is common in urban areas but rare in rural areas. Access to all amenities was better in Russia compared with elsewhere in the region. Indoor access to cold water was significantly more common among rural residents living in apartments, and in settlements served by asphalt roads rather than dirt roads. People with more assets or income and living with other people were significantly more likely to have water on tap. In addition, people who had moved in more recently were more likely to have an indoor water supply. CONCLUSIONS: This was the largest single study of its kind undertaken in this region, and demonstrates that a significant number of people living in rural parts of the former Soviet Union do not have indoor access to running water and sanitation. There are significant variations among countries, with the worse situation in central Asia and the Caucasus, and the best situation in Russia. Access to water strongly correlates with socio-economic characteristics. These findings suggest a need for sustained investment in rebuilding basic infrastructure in the region, and monitoring the impact of living conditions on health.
PubMed ID
16473378 View in PubMed
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Account of a voyage of discovery to the north-east of Siberia, the frozen ocean and the north-east sea.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature2189
Source
N. Israel, Amsterdam and Da Capo Press, New York. Bibliotheca Australiana 64. 2 vols. in 1. Reprint of the 1806 edition.
Publication Type
Book/Book Chapter
Date
1969
Author
Sarychew, G.A.
Source
N. Israel, Amsterdam and Da Capo Press, New York. Bibliotheca Australiana 64. 2 vols. in 1. Reprint of the 1806 edition.
Date
1969
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Publication Type
Book/Book Chapter
Physical Holding
Alaska Medical Library
University of Alaska Anchorage
Keywords
Unalaska
Labrets
Tobacco
Shaman
Transvestism
Medicinal plants
Epistaxis
Diet, traditional
Traditional healing
Housing
Sanitation
Notes
Alaska Medical Library - From: Fortuine, Robert et al. 1993. The Health of the Inuit of North America: A Bibliography from the Earliest Times through 1990. University of Alaska Anchorage. Citation number 383.
UAA/APU Consortium, Alaskana Collection DK754 S242
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[A "contagionist" physician in Qu├ębec: The writings of doctor Marsden (1868-1869)].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature216036
Source
Health Can Soc. 1995;3(1-2):43-69
Publication Type
Article
Date
1995

Acute infectious diarrheal illness in a First Nations community in northern Manitoba, Canada: Epidemiology and the impact of water, sanitation, and housing

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature256677
Source
Page 46 in S. Chatwood, P. Orr and Tiina Ikaheimo, eds. Proceedings of the 14th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Yellowknife, Canada, July 11-16, 2009. Securing the IPY Legacy: from Research to Action. International Journal of Circumpolar Health 2010; 69 (Suppl 7).
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Date
2010
ACUTE INFECTIOUS DIARRHEAL ILLNESS IN A FIRST NATIONS COMMUNITY IN NORTHERN MANITOBA, CANADA, EPIDEMIOLOGY AND THE IMPACT OF WATER, SANITATION, AND HOUSING P. Hayward, B. Martin, P. Hazelton, E. Rubinstein, P. Orr University of British Columbia This prospective study was undertaken in
  1 document  
Author
Hayward P
Martin B
Hazelton P
Rubinstein E
Orr P
Author Affiliation
University of British Columbia
Source
Page 46 in S. Chatwood, P. Orr and Tiina Ikaheimo, eds. Proceedings of the 14th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Yellowknife, Canada, July 11-16, 2009. Securing the IPY Legacy: from Research to Action. International Journal of Circumpolar Health 2010; 69 (Suppl 7).
Date
2010
Language
English
Geographic Location
Canada
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Physical Holding
University of Alaska Anchorage
Keywords
Illness
Water
Sanitation
Housing
First Nations
Canada
Diarrhea
Pathogens
Sewage
Notes
Part of Abstracts: Oral Presentations. Chapter 1. Public Health Perspectives.
Documents
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[Acute morbidity and risk factors in Telemark 1870-1900].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature183964
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2003 Aug 14;123(15):2086-90
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-14-2003
Author
Asbjørn Storesund
Author Affiliation
Institutt for allmenn- og samfunnsmedisin, Universitetet i Oslo, Postboks 1130 Blindern, 0318 Oslo. asbjorn.storesund@hit.no
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2003 Aug 14;123(15):2086-90
Date
Aug-14-2003
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acute Disease
Bacterial Infections - epidemiology - history - mortality - transmission
Disease Outbreaks - history
Food Habits
Gastroenteritis - epidemiology - history - mortality
Health status
History, 19th Century
History, 20th Century
Humans
Hygiene - history
Norway - epidemiology
Respiratory Tract Infections - epidemiology - history - mortality
Risk factors
Sanitation - history
Abstract
In spite of methodological problems it has been concluded that Norwegian health statistics on acute morbidity in the late 19th century reflect genuine nation-wide health differences, a fact which calls for studies on living conditions in the areas concerned.
Data on morbidity have been extracted from the annual medical reports from seven health districts in Telemark between 1870 and 1900. The incidence of widespread contagious diseases in two selected groups is calculated.
Illness increased in Skien health district throughout the period, while in Kragerø it declined from about 1885. The occurrence of acute gastrointestinal infections was higher in Skien and Kragerø than in the five rural districts. Remotely located rural districts had fewer outbreaks of epidemic diseases than the more central districts.
High occurrence of acute infections appears to have been related to extensive migration and a high level of through traffic. High population density combined with poor sanitary conditions seems to be a main cause of acute gastrointestinal infections. No obvious connections were found between health status and standards of general hygiene, diet and economic boom periods. It has not been possible to document any evident effects of public health work an acute morbidity, a few diseases of minor importance disregarded.
PubMed ID
12934143 View in PubMed
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[A functional subsystem of sanitary-and-epidemiological situation surveillance of the unified state system for prevention and elimination of emergence situations].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature132133
Source
Gig Sanit. 2011 May-Jun;(3):4-7
Publication Type
Article
Author
G G Onishchenko
V Iu Smolenskii
Source
Gig Sanit. 2011 May-Jun;(3):4-7
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Communicable Diseases - epidemiology
Emergency Medical Services - organization & administration
Humans
Population Surveillance - methods
Russia - epidemiology
Sanitation - methods
Abstract
Mass destructions of the social infrastructure and household systems under stressors in the areas of emergency situations involve marked sanitary-and-epidemiological problems in a region's population, which in turn give rise to the activation of routes of transmission and formation of infectious and parasitic diseases. The most important lines of activities of supervising the sanitary-and-epidemiological situation under emergencies are to timely assess the sanitary-and-epidemiological situation, to predict, to organize, and to correct sanitary-and-antiepidemic measures.
PubMed ID
21845768 View in PubMed
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Age at acquisition of Helicobacter pylori in a pediatric Canadian First Nations population.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature4343
Source
Helicobacter. 2002 Apr;7(2):76-85
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2002
Author
Samir K Sinha
Bruce Martin
Michael Sargent
Jospeh P McConnell
Charles N Bernstein
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Canada.
Source
Helicobacter. 2002 Apr;7(2):76-85
Date
Apr-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age of Onset
Antigens, Bacterial - analysis
Body Height
Child
Child, Preschool
Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay
Feces - microbiology
Female
Helicobacter Infections - diagnosis - epidemiology
Helicobacter pylori - isolation & purification
Hemoglobins
Humans
Indians, North American - statistics & numerical data
Infant
Male
Manitoba - epidemiology
Occult Blood
Prevalence
Prospective Studies
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Sanitation
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Few data exist regarding the epidemiology of Helicobacter pylori infections in aboriginal, including the First Nations (Indian) or Inuit (Eskimo) populations of North America. We have previously found 95% of the adults in Wasagamack, a First Nations community in Northeastern Manitoba, Canada, are seropositive for H. pylori. We aimed to determine the age at acquisition of H. pylori among the children of this community, and if any association existed with stool occult blood or demographic factors. MATERIALS AND METHODS: We prospectively enrolled children resident in the Wasagamack First Nation in August 1999. A demographic questionnaire was administered. Stool was collected, frozen and batch analyzed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for H. pylori antigen and for the presence of occult blood. Questionnaire data were analyzed and correlated with the presence or absence of H. pylori. RESULTS: 163 (47%) of the estimated 350 children aged 6 weeks to 12 years, resident in the community were enrolled. Stool was positive for H. pylori in 92 (56%). By the second year of life 67% were positive for H. pylori. The youngest to test positive was 6 weeks old. There was no correlation of a positive H. pylori status with gender, presence of pets, serum Hgb, or stool occult blood. Forty-three percent of H. pylori positive and 24% of H. pylori negative children were
PubMed ID
11966865 View in PubMed
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384 records – page 1 of 39.