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Abdominal symptoms among sewage workers.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature10795
Source
Occup Med (Lond). 1998 May;48(4):251-3
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-1998
Author
L. Friis
L. Agréus
C. Edling
Author Affiliation
Department of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, University Hospital, Uppsala, Sweden. Lennart.Friis@arbmed.uas.se
Source
Occup Med (Lond). 1998 May;48(4):251-3
Date
May-1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Cross-Sectional Studies
Diarrhea - epidemiology
Gastrointestinal Diseases - epidemiology
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Nausea - epidemiology
Occupational Diseases - epidemiology
Peptic Ulcer - epidemiology
Prevalence
Risk factors
Sanitary Engineering
Sewage
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
The objective of this cross-sectional study was to investigate the prevalence of abdominal symptoms and the abdominal medical history among sewage workers. 142 male sewage workers and 137 male referents in 11 Swedish municipalities were addressed with a questionnaire about abdominal symptoms, medical history, occupational history and life style factors. The sewage workers suffered less from nausea [adjusted odds ratio (adjOR) = 0.18, 95% confidence interval (Cl) 0.04-0.84] than the referents. There was no significant difference in the three months prevalence of diarrhoea (adjOR = 1.7, 95% Cl = 0.79-3.4), dyspepsia (adjOR = 0.85, 95% Cl = 0.49-1.5) or irritable bowel syndrome (adjOR = 1.4, 95% Cl = 0.53-3.5). The sewage workers were affected more often by peptic ulcers during their present jobs than the referents, although the increased risk was not significant (adjOR = 1.4, 95% Cl = 0.31-6.1). The odds ratios were adjusted for age, use of tobacco products and alcohol consumption. The conclusion of this study was that sewage workers are less affected by nausea than comparable referents.
PubMed ID
9800423 View in PubMed
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[Analysis of the causes of impaired quality of water from underground sources].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature227454
Source
Gig Sanit. 1991 Jan;(1):26-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-1991

Application of lead monitoring results to predict 0-7 year old children's exposure at the tap.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature115654
Source
Water Res. 2013 May 1;47(7):2409-20
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-1-2013
Author
Elise Deshommes
Michèle Prévost
Patrick Levallois
France Lemieux
Shokoufeh Nour
Author Affiliation
NSERC Industrial Chair on Drinking Water, Polytechnique Montreal, Civil, Geological, and Mining Engineering Department, CP 6079, Succ. Centre-Ville, Montréal (QC), Canada H3C3A7. elise.deshommes@polymtl.ca
Source
Water Res. 2013 May 1;47(7):2409-20
Date
May-1-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Child
Child, Preschool
Computer simulation
Decision Trees
Environmental monitoring
Housing
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Lead - analysis
Sanitary Engineering
Seasons
Temperature
Water Pollutants, Chemical - analysis
Abstract
Dwellings with/without a lead service line [LSL] were sampled for lead in tap water in Montreal, during different seasons. Short-term simulations using these results and the batchrun mode of the Integrated Exposure Uptake Biokinetic (IEUBK) model showed that children's exposure to lead at the tap in the presence of an LSL varies seasonally, and according to the type of dwelling. From July to March, for single-family homes, the estimated geometric mean [GM] blood lead level [BLL] decreased from 2.3-3.6 µg/dL to 1.5-2.5 µg/dL, depending on the children's age. The wide seasonal variations in lead exposure result in a minimal fraction (0-6%) of children with a predicted BLL >5 µg/dL in winter, as opposed to a significant proportion (5-25%) in summer. These estimations are in close agreement with the BLLs measured in Montreal children in fall and winter, and simulations using summer water lead levels illustrate the importance of measuring BLLs during the summer. Finally, simulations for wartime residences with long LSLs confirm the need to prioritize the control of this lead exposure from tap water.
PubMed ID
23481285 View in PubMed
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[Characteristics of the sanitary protection of reservoirs under Arctic conditions]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature4381
Source
Gig Sanit. 1979 Jan;(1):81-2
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-1979

Coming to grips with a slippery issue: human waste disposal in cold climates.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature4350
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 1999 Jan;58(1):57-62
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-1999
Author
V B Meyer-Rochow
Author Affiliation
Institute of Arctic Medicine, University of Oulu, Finland.
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 1999 Jan;58(1):57-62
Date
Jan-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Antarctic Regions
Arctic Regions
Biodegradation
Cold Climate
Comparative Study
Ecosystem
Humans
Refuse Disposal - methods
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sanitary Engineering - methods
Sewage - adverse effects - microbiology
Temperature
Water Microbiology
Abstract
Problems associated with sewage treatment and human wastes at high latitudes are briefly reviewed. In view of the fact that E. coli and other faecal bacteria can survive in the snow and the coastal waters of polar regions, several methods of how to deal with sewage outfalls in the Arctic and Antarctic are compared and discussed. Some consequences of raw sewage on the health of captive populations of a variety of Antarctic invertebrates and fish are described. Locomotion and respiration appear to be most affected. However, gaps, both in understanding the biological impact of human sewage on polar ecosystems and in finding optimal solutions for the disposal and treatment of the wastes generated by people who live in polar settlements, unfortunately still remain.
PubMed ID
10208071 View in PubMed
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Comparison of the microbiological quality of water coolers and that of municipal water systems.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature218521
Source
Appl Environ Microbiol. 1994 Apr;60(4):1174-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-1994
Author
B. Lévesque
P. Simard
D. Gauvin
S. Gingras
E. Dewailly
R. Letarte
Author Affiliation
Service Santé et Environnement, Centre de Santé Publique de Québec, Ste. Foy, Canada.
Source
Appl Environ Microbiol. 1994 Apr;60(4):1174-8
Date
Apr-1994
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Drinking
Equipment Contamination
Household Articles
Humans
Hygiene
Mineral Waters - analysis
Quebec
Sanitary Engineering
Water Microbiology
Water Pollution
Water Supply - standards
Abstract
The microbiological quality of tap water and that of water from 50 water coolers located in residences and workplaces were comparatively studied. In addition, difference factors that might influence the bacteriological contamination of water dispensers were examined. Aeorbic and facultative anaerobic heterotrophic bacteria, total coliforms, and two indicators for fecal contamination (fecal coliforms and fecal streptococci) as well as three types of pathogenic bacteria (Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Aeromonas spp.) were enumerated. It was found that 36 and 28% of the water dispenser samples from the residences and the workplaces, respectively, were contaminated by a least one coliform or indicator bacterium and/or at least one pathogenic bacterium. The respective proportions of tap water samples contaminated in a similar fashion were 18 and 22%, much less than those observed for water coolers (Chi2(1) = 3.71, P = 0.05). We were unable to discern the dominant factors responsible for the contamination of water coolers, but cleaning the water dispenser every 2 months seemed to limit the extent of contamination.
Notes
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PubMed ID
8017912 View in PubMed
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Determinants of waterpipe use amongst adolescents in Northern Sweden: a survey of use pattern, risk perception, and environmental factors.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature273709
Source
BMC Res Notes. 2015;8:441
Publication Type
Article
Date
2015
Author
Rathi Ramji
Judy Arnetz
Maria Nilsson
Hikmet Jamil
Fredrik Norström
Wasim Maziak
Ywonne Wiklund
Bengt Arnetz
Source
BMC Res Notes. 2015;8:441
Date
2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Environment
Female
Humans
Logistic Models
Male
Marketing
Risk-Taking
Sanitary Engineering
Smoking
Surveys and Questionnaires
Sweden
Young Adult
Abstract
Determinants of waterpipe use in adolescents are believed to differ from those for other tobacco products, but there is a lack of studies of possible social, cultural, or psychological aspects of waterpipe use in this population. This study applied a socioecological model to explore waterpipe use, and its relationship to other tobacco use in Swedish adolescents.
A total of 106 adolescents who attended an urban high-school in northern Sweden responded to an anonymous questionnaire. Prevalence rates for waterpipe use were examined in relation to socio-demographics, peer pressure, sensation seeking behavior, harm perception, environmental factors, and depression.
Thirty-three percent reported ever having smoked waterpipe (ever use), with 30% having done so during the last 30 days (current use). Among waterpipe ever users, 60% had ever smoked cigarettes in comparison to 32% of non-waterpipe smokers (95% confidence interval 1.4-7.9). The odds of having ever smoked waterpipe were three times higher among male high school seniors as well as students with lower grades. Waterpipe ever users had three times higher odds of having higher levels of sensation-seeking (95% confidence interval 1.2-9.5) and scored high on the depression scales (95% confidence interval 1.6-6.8) than non-users. The odds of waterpipe ever use were four times higher for those who perceived waterpipe products to have pleasant smell compared to cigarettes (95% confidence interval 1.7-9.8). Waterpipe ever users were twice as likely to have seen waterpipe use on television compared to non-users (95% confidence interval 1.1-5.7). The odds of having friends who smoked regularly was eight times higher for waterpipe ever users than non-users (95% confidence interval 2.1-31.2).
The current study reports a high use of waterpipe in a select group of students in northern Sweden. The study adds the importance of looking at socioecological determinants of use, including peer pressure and exposure to media marketing, as well as mental health among users.
Notes
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PubMed ID
26374502 View in PubMed
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[Determination of groups at risk for acute intestinal infections by a population questionnaire].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature240070
Source
Zh Mikrobiol Epidemiol Immunobiol. 1984 Oct;(10):55-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-1984
Author
A M Zaidenov
M I Narkevich
V N Miliutin
P A Zolotov
F A Surkov
Source
Zh Mikrobiol Epidemiol Immunobiol. 1984 Oct;(10):55-8
Date
Oct-1984
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acute Disease
Adult
Child
Humans
Intestinal Diseases - epidemiology
Mass Screening - methods
Questionnaires
Residence Characteristics
Risk
Russia
Sanitary Engineering
Sanitation
Water supply
Abstract
Questionnaires were distributed in 3308 families divided into two groups: group 1 with no cases of acute intestinal infections and group 2 where such cases were registered. Information contained in the questionnaires was processes by means of computers bzsm-6. The analysis of the data on the occurrence of characteristics indicating the quality of water supply and water consumption (25 characteristics), sewage and sanitation (12 characteristics), living conditions (19 characteristics) showed that the living conditions of the families in group 2 were worse than those of the families in group 1. The occurrence of these characteristics in the families of patients with acute intestinal infections and in the families of carriers were mostly the same, and the existing differences in such characteristics as "fishing", "use of water from ponds for house-hold purposes" proved to be nonessential. The population of the city was divided into four risk groups with regard to the possibility of contacting infection, depending on the conditions of water supply, water consumption and sewage in different housing areas: the group registered as stable on account of sanitary and hygienic conditions, the groups of usual, increased and maximum risk.
PubMed ID
6240874 View in PubMed
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Diarrhoea following contamination of drinking water with copper.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature33288
Source
Eur J Med Res. 1999 Jun 28;4(6):217-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-28-1999
Author
L. Stenhammar
Author Affiliation
Department of Paediatrics, Linköping University, Norrköping Hospital, S-601 82 Norrköping, Sweden.
Source
Eur J Med Res. 1999 Jun 28;4(6):217-8
Date
Jun-28-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Child, Preschool
Copper - analysis - metabolism - toxicity
Diarrhea - blood - chemically induced - urine
Drinking
Female
Humans
Infant
Male
Sanitary Engineering
Sweden
Water Pollutants, Chemical - analysis - toxicity
Water Supply - analysis
Abstract
Three cases of children with suspected copper intoxication from the drinking water are described.The children presented with protracted diarrhoea, which promptly disappeared, when they were given drinking water of low copper concentration but reappeared when given their domestic water. It is concluded that the use of copper tubing in the water pipes may under certain circumstances result in the presence of copper in the drinking water and the risk of intoxication, especially in small children.
PubMed ID
10383874 View in PubMed
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57 records – page 1 of 6.