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Adolescence. Vancouver Conference Review.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature7752
Source
AIDS Care. 1997 Feb;9(1):62-6
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Date
Feb-1997

AIDS management: five hospitals compared.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature230659
Source
Dimens Health Serv. 1989 Jun;66(5):14-7, 28-30
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1989

[AIDS--prevention we can start to learn from]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature8646
Source
Sygeplejersken. 1988 Feb 24;88(8):20-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-24-1988

An international comparison of cancer survival: relatively poor areas of Toronto, Ontario and three US metropolitan areas.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature196630
Source
J Public Health Med. 2000 Sep;22(3):343-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2000
Author
K M Gorey
E J Holowaty
G. Fehringer
E. Laukkanen
N L Richter
C M Meyer
Author Affiliation
School of Social Work, University of Windsor, Ontario, Canada. gorey@uwindsor.ca
Source
J Public Health Med. 2000 Sep;22(3):343-8
Date
Sep-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Censuses
Cities - epidemiology
Connecticut - epidemiology
Cross-Cultural Comparison
Female
Humans
Male
Neoplasms - economics - mortality
Ontario - epidemiology
Poverty Areas
Registries
SEER Program
San Francisco - epidemiology
Sex Distribution
Socioeconomic Factors
Survival Analysis
Urban Population - statistics & numerical data
Washington - epidemiology
Abstract
This study of cancer survival compared adults in Toronto, Ontario and three US metropolitan areas: Seattle, Washington; San Francisco, California; and Hartford, Connecticut. It examined whether socioeconomic status has a differential effect on cancer survival in Canada and the United States.
The Ontario Cancer Registry and the National Cancer Institute's Surveillance, Epidemiology and End
(SEER) programme provided a total of 23,437 and 37,329 population-based primary malignant cancer cases for the Toronto and US samples, respectively (1986-1988, followed until 1994). Census-based measures of socioeconomic status were used to ecologically control absolute income status.
Among residents of low-income areas, persons in Toronto experienced a 5 year survival advantage for 13 of 15 cancer sites [minimally one gender significant at 95 per cent confidence interval (CI)]. An aggregate 35 per cent survival advantage among the Canadian cohort was demonstrated (survival rate ratio (SRR) = 1.35, 95 per cent CI= 1.30-1.40), and this effect was even larger among younger patients not yet eligible for Medicare coverage in the United States (SRR = 1.46, 95 per cent CI = 1.40-1.52).
Systematically replicating a previous Toronto-Detroit comparison, this study's observed consistent pattern of Canadian survival advantage across various cancer sites suggests that their more equitable access to preventive and therapeutic health care services may be responsible for the difference.
PubMed ID
11077908 View in PubMed
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Assessment of clients health needs of two urban Native American health centers in the San Francisco Bay Area.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature97983
Source
J Health Care Poor Underserved. 2009;20(4):1060-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
2009
Author
James Glasnapp
Elizabeth Butrick
Susan Jamerson
Mark Espinoza
Author Affiliation
Computing Science Laboratory, Palo Alto Research Center, 3333 Coyote Hill Rd., Palo Alto, CA 94304, USA. glasnapp@parc.com
Source
J Health Care Poor Underserved. 2009;20(4):1060-7
Date
2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Female
Health Status Disparities
Humans
Indians, North American - statistics & numerical data
Male
Middle Aged
Needs Assessment
Primary Health Care
Questionnaires
San Francisco
Urban health
Urban Health Services
Young Adult
Abstract
A needs assessment was compiled from self-administered questionnaires completed by 796 clients at the Urban Indian Health Service clinics in San Francisco and Oakland, California. Data on the health disparities between Native Americans and Alaskan Natives and the rest of the U.S. population are limited. The data that exist, however, indicate that Native Americans continue to fare worse than the general population. This needs assessment reveals the same trend among a sample of clients of two Native American Health Centers in the San Francisco Bay Area and provides further information about the health needs and interests of the population currently attending these centers.
PubMed ID
20168018 View in PubMed
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Barriers beyond words: cancer, culture, and translation in a community of Russian speakers.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature160148
Source
J Gen Intern Med. 2007 Nov;22 Suppl 2:300-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2007
Author
Daniel Dohan
Marya Levintova
Author Affiliation
Institute for Health Policy Studies, University of California San Francisco, UCSF Box 0936, San Francisco, CA 94143, USA. Daniel.Dohan@ucsf.edu
Source
J Gen Intern Med. 2007 Nov;22 Suppl 2:300-5
Date
Nov-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Communication Barriers
Cultural Competency
Culture
Focus Groups
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Humans
Interviews as Topic
Neoplasms - diagnosis - ethnology - therapy
Professional-Patient Relations
Qualitative Research
Russia - ethnology
San Francisco - epidemiology
Translating
Abstract
Language and culture relate in complex ways. Addressing this complexity in the context of language translation is a challenge when caring for patients with limited English proficiency (LEP).
To examine processes of care related to language, culture and translation in an LEP population is the objective of this study.
We used community based participatory research to examine the experiences of Russian-speaking cancer patients in San Francisco, California. A Russian Cancer Information Taskforce (RCIT), including community-based organizations, local government, and clinics, participated in all phases of the study.
A purposeful sample of 74 individuals were the participants of the study.
The RCIT shaped research themes and facilitated access to participants. Methods were focus groups, individual interviews, and participant observation. RCIT reviewed data and provided guidance in interpreting results.
Four themes emerged. (1) Local Russian-language resources were seen as inadequate and relatively unavailable compared to other non-English languages; (2) a taboo about the word "cancer" led to language "games" surrounding disclosure; (3) this taboo, and other dynamics of care, reflected expectations that Russian speakers derived from experiences in their countries of origin; (4) using interpreters as cultural brokers or establishing support groups for Russian speakers could help address barriers.
The language barriers experienced by this LEP population reflect cultural and linguistic issues. Providers should consider partnering with trained interpreters to address the intertwining of language and culture.
Notes
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PubMed ID
17957415 View in PubMed
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Characteristics of successful and failed mentoring relationships: a qualitative study across two academic health centers.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature118834
Source
Acad Med. 2013 Jan;88(1):82-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2013
Author
Sharon E Straus
Mallory O Johnson
Christine Marquez
Mitchell D Feldman
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine, Division of Geriatric Medicine, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. Sharon.straus@utoronto.ca
Source
Acad Med. 2013 Jan;88(1):82-9
Date
Jan-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Academic Medical Centers
Adult
Attitude of Health Personnel
Communication
Competitive Behavior
Conflict of Interest
Faculty, Medical
Female
Humans
Interprofessional Relations
Interviews as Topic
Male
Mentors
Middle Aged
Ontario
San Francisco
Students, Medical
Abstract
To explore the mentor-mentee relationship with a focus on determining the characteristics of effective mentors and mentees and understanding the factors influencing successful and failed mentoring relationships.
The authors completed a qualitative study through the Departments of Medicine at the University of Toronto Faculty of Medicine and the University of California, San Francisco, School of Medicine between March 2010 and January 2011. They conducted individual, semistructured interviews with faculty members from different career streams and ranks and analyzed transcripts of the interviews, drawing on grounded theory.
The authors completed interviews with 54 faculty members and identified a number of themes, including the characteristics of effective mentors and mentees, actions of effective mentors, characteristics of successful and failed mentoring relationships, and tactics for successful mentoring relationships. Successful mentoring relationships were characterized by reciprocity, mutual respect, clear expectations, personal connection, and shared values. Failed mentoring relationships were characterized by poor communication, lack of commitment, personality differences, perceived (or real) competition, conflicts of interest, and the mentor's lack of experience.
Successful mentorship is vital to career success and satisfaction for both mentors and mentees. Yet challenges continue to inhibit faculty members from receiving effective mentorship. Given the importance of mentorship on faculty members' careers, future studies must address the association between a failed mentoring relationship and a faculty member's career success, how to assess different approaches to mediating failed mentoring relationships, and how to evaluate strategies for effective mentorship throughout a faculty member's career.
Notes
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PubMed ID
23165266 View in PubMed
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Clinically silent preoperative brain injuries do not worsen with surgery in neonates with congenital heart disease.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature143863
Source
J Thorac Cardiovasc Surg. 2010 Sep;140(3):550-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2010
Author
A J Block
P S McQuillen
V. Chau
H. Glass
K J Poskitt
A J Barkovich
M. Esch
W. Soulikias
A. Azakie
A. Campbell
S P Miller
Author Affiliation
Department of Pediatrics, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada.
Source
J Thorac Cardiovasc Surg. 2010 Sep;140(3):550-7
Date
Sep-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Brain - pathology
British Columbia
Cardiac Surgical Procedures - adverse effects
Catheterization - adverse effects
Disease Progression
Female
Heart Defects, Congenital - blood - complications - surgery
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Intracranial Hemorrhages - blood - complications - pathology
Logistic Models
Magnetic Resonance Imaging
Male
Oxygen - blood
Prospective Studies
Risk assessment
Risk factors
San Francisco
Stroke - blood - complications - pathology
Time Factors
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
Preoperative brain injury, particularly stroke and white matter injury, is common in neonates with congenital heart disease. The objective of this study was to determine the risk of hemorrhage or extension of preoperative brain injury with cardiac surgery.
This dual-center prospective cohort study recruited 92 term neonates, 62 with transposition of the great arteries and 30 with single ventricle physiology, from 2 tertiary referral centers. Neonates underwent brain magnetic resonance imaging scans before and after cardiac surgery.
Brain injury was identified in 40 (43%) neonates on the preoperative magnetic resonance imaging scan (median 5 days after birth): stroke in 23, white matter injury in 21, and intraventricular hemorrhage in 7. None of the brain lesions presented clinically with overt signs or seizures. Preoperative brain injury was associated with balloon atrial septostomy (P = .003) and lowest arterial oxygen saturation (P = .007); in a multivariable model, only the effect of balloon atrial septostomy remained significant when adjusting for lowest arterial oxygen saturation. On postoperative magnetic resonance imaging in 78 neonates (median 21 days after birth), none of the preoperative lesions showed evidence of extension or hemorrhagic transformation (0/40 [95% confidence interval: 0%-7%]). The presence of preoperative brain injury was not a significant risk factor for acquiring new injury on postoperative magnetic resonance imaging (P = .8).
Clinically silent brain injuries identified preoperatively in neonates with congenital heart disease, including stroke, have a low risk of progression with surgery and cardiopulmonary bypass and should therefore not delay clinically indicated cardiac surgery. In this multicenter cohort, balloon atrial septostomy remains an important risk factor for preoperative brain injury, particularly stroke.
Notes
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PubMed ID
20434174 View in PubMed
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42 records – page 1 of 5.