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62 records – page 1 of 7.

Source
Vesterheim. Vol. 8, No. 1 : p. 18-24.
Publication Type
Article
Date
2010
, stories from the Reindeer Project began to appear in Báiki: the International Sami Journal. As a collection of photographs and other information was amassed, two invaluable documents took shape. These were “An Inuit/ Sámi Reindeer in Alaska Chronology” by Nathan Muus, which can be viewed on the Báiki
  1 document  
Author
Fjeld, Faith
Source
Vesterheim. Vol. 8, No. 1 : p. 18-24.
Date
2010
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Publication Type
Article
File Size
4925396
Keywords
Alaska
Reindeer herding
Sami
Yup'ik Inuit
Reindeer Project
Documents

Vesterheim-A-reindeer-story.pdf

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An examination of the myth of rampant Sami alcoholism.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature296736
Source
University of Texas at Austin. Sami Culture.
Publication Type
Article
Date
2007
Author
Kunec, Kevin
Source
University of Texas at Austin. Sami Culture.
Date
2007
Language
English
Geographic Location
Finland
Norway
Sweden
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Sami
Alcoholism
Laestadianism
Notes
Online. Available from the University of Texas, Sami Web at https://www.laits.utexas.edu/sami/dieda/socio/alcohol.htm
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Being Sami enough - increasing the Sami stage of performance.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature296747
Source
Department of Social Anthropology, University of Oslo.
Publication Type
Dissertation
Date
Spring 2017
I Being Sami Enough Increasing the Sami Stage of Performance Maria Hernes Master thesis Department of Social Anthropology University of Oslo Spring 2017 II Being Sami Enough Increasing the Sami Stage of
  1 document  
Author
Hernes, Maria
Source
Department of Social Anthropology, University of Oslo.
Date
Spring 2017
Language
English
Geographic Location
Norway
Publication Type
Dissertation
File Size
1758970
Keywords
Sami
Ethnicity
Language
Gakti
Cultural expression
Abstract
The area of inner Finnmark is often presented as a core Sami area. Many of the cultural markers that are considered and recognised as Sami, are based on traits from these areas. Based on fieldwork done mainly in inner Finnmark, I argue that there is a constant process of expressing a Sami ethnicity within a performance stage defined by both the norms of "how to be Sami" and the ever evolving and breaking of new grounds for this performance. The process might be conceptualised as two axes; one illustrating a measurement of "purity" and the other the constant means of expanding the boundaries for expressions of the Sami ethnicity. Language is a vital foundation that affects both of these axes; although it is used contextually as a marker of Sami ethnicity, it is still an important, perhaps the most important way to assert ones Sami ethnicity, as it makes out the basis of the objective part of the Sami Act’s criteria for how one might be considered Sami. The language is both an important means of communication, and thus social inclusion, but it is also a deeply emotional matter that carries meaning beyond the use as a marker of ethnicity. The gákti (Sami traditional clothes) might be considered the most recognised emblem of Sami ethnicity besides the languages. The making of the gákti is a process that involves both the continuation of cultural specific knowledge, and the composing of new expressions. As the gákti is a garment that pinpoints the wearers geographically based affiliation, it also connects the wearer to a specific social community and might counteract feelings of rootlessness associated with globalisation. Still, it also allows for a range of manipulation within certain boundaries. Based on these two examples, the language and the gákti, I argue that while the Sami ethnic identity needs to take on the challenge of including people into the ethnic group that does not necessarily master this knowledge, this might still be a difficult process for many of the people considering this knowledge as vital for themselves and for their ethnic expression.
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'Bushcraft' and 'Indigenous Knowledge' transformations of a concept in the modern world.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature297019
Source
School of Anthropology and Conservation, University of Kent. 320 p.
Publication Type
Dissertation
Date
2016
  1 document  
Author
Fenton, Lisa
Source
School of Anthropology and Conservation, University of Kent. 320 p.
Date
2016
Language
English
Geographic Location
Multi-National
Publication Type
Dissertation
File Size
29597515
Keywords
Saami Kuksa
Traditional knowledge
Bushcraft
Sami
Bow-drill
Trapping
Abstract
The relationship between ‘bushcraft’ and ‘indigenous knowledge’ is investigated through a historical review, an examination of ethnographic literature, fieldwork amongst bushcraft practitioners, and through original case studies. Fieldwork was carried out in Sweden, the USA, and the UK. Case studies of the Saami ‘kuksa’, the ‘figure 4’ deadfall trap, and making fire by friction are used to explore a number of themes in the contemporary bushcraft world: the role of skilled-practice, ethical values, notions of an individually experienced connection with nature, practice as a personal transformative experience, and as an intersubjective relationship between practitioner and craft engagement with the material affordances in the landscape. It is argued that motivations for practice foreground a relationship with an environmental experience that counters ‘alienation’ through the development of techniques required to spend un-insulated time in nature which counter modern Western technocratic lifestyles. Bushcraft destabilises apparently similar categories of activity, particularly tourism, outdoor adventure recreation and education, historical reenactment and survivalism.
Documents

207Bushcraft-and-Indigenous-Knowledge--transformations-of-a-concept-in-the-m.pdf

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Canadian Inuit use of caribou and Swedish Sami use of reindeer in entrepreneurship.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature297035
Source
University of Canterbury. 460 p.
Publication Type
Dissertation
Date
2015
........................................................ 27 2.2.5 Product Differentiation ................................................................. 29 2.2.6 Interest in Animal Welfare ........................................................... 32 3 Canadian Inuit, Swedish Sami and Other Selected Indigenous Peoples’ Use of Caribou/Reindeer for
  1 document  
Author
Mason, Aldene Helen Meis
Source
University of Canterbury. 460 p.
Date
2015
Language
English
Geographic Location
Multi-National
Publication Type
Dissertation
File Size
8230174
Keywords
Reindeer herding
Entrepreneurship
Economic development
Inuit
Sami
Subsistence hunting
Documents

MeisMason_thesis_fulltext.pdf

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Source
Norwegian Ministry of Climate and Environment. Meld. St. 33 (2012–2013) Report to the Storting (white paper). 107 p.
Publication Type
Book/Book Chapter
Date
2015
................... 25 3.4 Infrastructure ................................. 27 3.5 The Norwegian business sector ... 30 3.6 Cultural heritage ............................ 32 3.7 The Sami culture and way of life .. 35 4 Common framework for adaptation to climate change .. 37 4.1 Everyone shares the responsibility for
  1 document  
Source
Norwegian Ministry of Climate and Environment. Meld. St. 33 (2012–2013) Report to the Storting (white paper). 107 p.
Date
2015
Language
English
Geographic Location
Norway
Publication Type
Book/Book Chapter
File Size
12235129
Keywords
Climate change
Sami
Documents

stm201220130033000engpdfs.pdf

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Climate change effects on snow conditions and the human rights of reindeer herders.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature297057
Source
Pace Environemental Law Review. Volume 33, issue 1. Fall 2015. Article 1. 22 p.
Publication Type
Article
Date
2015
ECOLOGY, ECONOMY, SOCIOLOGY AND MANAGEMENT OF SAMI SEINDEER HERDING 1 (n.d.), http://library.arcticportal.org/550/1/Eira_127801.pdf [http://perma.cc/HMX4- W9CV]. 9. Note that the term “Lapps” (Finnish: Lappalainen), which can be found in older publications, is today considered derogatory, and that
  1 document  
Author
Kirchner, Stefan
Author Affiliation
University of Lapland
Source
Pace Environemental Law Review. Volume 33, issue 1. Fall 2015. Article 1. 22 p.
Date
2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
File Size
307695
Keywords
Climate change
Sami
Reindeer herders
Wind energy
Documents

Climate-Change-Effects-on-Snow-Conditions-and-the-Human-Rights-of.pdf

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Discrimination amongst Arctic Indigenous Sami and Non-Sami populations in Norway. The SAMINOR 2 Questionnaire Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature296258
Source
Journal of Northern Studies. Vol. 10, no. 2. p. 45-84.
Publication Type
Article
Date
2016
45 JOURNAL OF NORTHERN STUDIES Vol. 10 • No. 2 • 2016, pp. 45–84 KETIL LENERT HANSEN, STEPHEN JAMES MINTON, ODDGEIR FRIBORG & TORE SØRLIE Discrimination amongst Arctic Indigenous Sami and Non-Sami Populations in Norway The SAMINOR 2 Questionnaire Study ABSTRACT Background: Recent
  1 document  
Author
Hansen, Ketil Lenert
Minton, Stephen James
Friborg, Oddgeir
Sorlie, Tore
Source
Journal of Northern Studies. Vol. 10, no. 2. p. 45-84.
Date
2016
Language
English
Geographic Location
Norway
Publication Type
Article
File Size
3311588
Keywords
Sami
Discrimination
Ethnicity
Arctic
Indigenous
Abstract
Background: Recent research demonstrates that for many indigenous Sami people, experiencing ethnic discrimination is a regular occurrence. The present study was designed to provide estimates of the prevalence of self-reported discrimination in order to identify specific settings where discrimination happened, to identify perpetrators and to examine individuals’ responses to the discrimination.
Methods: In 2012, all inhabitants aged between 18 and 69 living in selected municipalities with both Sami and non-Sami settlements in mid- and northern Norway were mailed an invitation to participate in a questionnaire survey covering questions about discrimination (types of discrimination, settings where discrimination happened, and who the perpetrator was). Altogether, 11,600 participated (a response rate of 27 %).
Results: In total, 2,496 (21.5 % of the sample) reported discrimination; of these, 29.8 % reported that discrimination happened during the past two years. Ethnic affiliation, age, education level, income and living area were all significantly associated with differences in the frequency of experiencing discrimination. Respondents with a strong Sami affiliation reported the highest levels of discrimination; in total, 50.8 % responded that they had been discriminated against, compared with 14.3 % of the non-Sami respondents (OR=6.16 CI:5.42–7.00). Sami with strong Sami affiliation reported having experienced significantly more discrimination over the past two years more than did the non-Sami respondents (16.5 % vs 4.4 % respectively; p
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Discrimination of the Sami: the rights of the Sami from a discrimination perspective.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature296252
Source
Ombudsmannen mot etnisk diskriminering (DO) DO report no. 2008:1. 43 p.
Publication Type
Report
Date
2008
Discrimination of the Sami – the rights of the Sami from a discrimation perspective DO:s rapportserie 2008:1 eng Discrimination of the Sami – the rights of the Sami from a discrimination perspective Ombudsmannen mot etnisk diskriminering (DO) DO report no. 2008:1 eng © DO Authors
  1 document  
Author
Pikkarainen, Heidi
Brodin, Björn
Source
Ombudsmannen mot etnisk diskriminering (DO) DO report no. 2008:1. 43 p.
Date
2008
Language
English
Geographic Location
Sweden
Publication Type
Report
File Size
795221
Keywords
Sami
Education
Health and medical care
Language
Notes
ISBN 978-91-973654-7-5
This report is available in Swedish, North Sami, South Sami and Lule Sami. For more information, Please visit our website: www.do.se.
Documents

SwedishEqualityOmbudsman_2.pdf

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Distribution of apoB/apoA-1 ratio and blood lipids in Sami, Kven and Norwegian populations: the SAMINOR Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature296262
Source
International Journal of Circumpolar Health. 2008; 67(1):67-81.
Publication Type
Article
Date
2008
69International Journal of Circumpolar Health 67:1 2008 ApoB/apoA-1 ratio in Sami, Kven and Norwegian populations ORIGINAL ARTICLE DISTRIBUTION OF APOB/APOA-1 RATIO AND BLOOD LIPIDS IN SAMI, KVEN AND NORWEGIAN POPULATIONS: THE SAMINOR STUDY Tove Nystad 1, Egil Utsi 2, Randi Selmer 3, Jan
  1 document  
Author
Nystad, Tove
Utsi, Egil
Selmer, Randi
Brox, Jan
Melhus, Marita
Lund, Eiliv
Source
International Journal of Circumpolar Health. 2008; 67(1):67-81.
Date
2008
Language
English
Geographic Location
Norway
Publication Type
Article
File Size
315938
Keywords
Sami
SAMINOR
apoB/apoA-1 ratio
Total cholesterol
Ethnic
Cardiovascular disease
Abstract
Objectives. To assess the distribution of blood lipids, lipoprotein and apoB/apoA-1 ratio in a multi-ethnic population of Sami, Kvens and Norwegians in Norway. Study design. A population-based cross-sectional study was carried out in 2 003-2004 in an area with a mixed Sami, Kvens/Finns and Norwegian population, the SAMINOR study. Methods. A self-administrated questionnaire was distributed and total cholesterol, HDL cholesterol, triglycerides, apoB and apoA-1 counts were analysed in 6,461 women and 5 ,772 men between the ages of 36 and 79. Results. In 3 6–64 age group, Sami men and women had the highest apoB/apoA-1 ratio of the ethnic groups. The ethnic differences remained after adjustment for waist hip ratio, cigarette smoking, systolic and diastolic pressures, alcohol consumption, physical activity during leisure time and family history of myocardial infarction (MI). There were no significant ethnic differences in apoB/apoA-1 ratio in the older age group. Total cholesterol was significantly lower among Sami men and women, aged 65–79 years, than among the Norwegian. The opposite occurred in the 3 6–49 age group, with higher levels in the Sami population. We found no ethnic differences in HDL cholesterol and triglycerides. Conclusions. Middle-aged Sami women and men have increased levels of apoB/apoA-1 ratio and total cholesterol compared with Norwegians.
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62 records – page 1 of 7.