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131 records – page 1 of 14.

Ammonia sanitization of blackwater for safe use as fertilizer.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature268278
Source
Water Sci Technol. 2015;71(5):795-800
Publication Type
Article
Date
2015
Author
Jörgen Fidjeland
Sven-Erik Svensson
Björn Vinnerås
Source
Water Sci Technol. 2015;71(5):795-800
Date
2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Ammonia - chemistry
Animals
Ascaris
Calcium Compounds - chemistry
Disinfection - methods
Enterococcus
Enterococcus faecalis
Escherichia coli
Escherichia coli O157
Fertilizers
Oxides - chemistry
Salmonella
Salmonella typhimurium
Sweden
Temperature
Urea - chemistry
Waste Water - chemistry - microbiology - parasitology
Abstract
Source-separated blackwater from low-flush toilets contains plant-available nutrients and can be used as a fertilizer. The aim of the study was to evaluate the impact on pathogen inactivation when treating blackwater with urea and/or lime. Blackwater was spiked with Salmonella typhimurium, Escherichia coli O157, Enterococcus faecalis, and Ascaris suum eggs, and treated with urea and/or lime in concentrations up to 0.1% w/w. The bottles were kept in a storage facility (manure slurry tank) for 102 days while monitoring the pathogen concentrations. The treatment time needed to meet the requirement for Salmonella and E. coli reduction could be reduced at least six-fold. The enterococci were more persistent, and only the highest treatment doses had a significantly higher inactivation than the controls. The Ascaris egg viability was only reduced by around 50%, so higher urea/lime doses and/or longer treatment times are required to fulfill the treatment requirements of 3 log10 reductions of parasite eggs.
PubMed ID
25768229 View in PubMed
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[Analysis of plasmid profile of antibiotic-resistant Enterobacteriaceae circulating in hospitals].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature229366
Source
Antibiot Khimioter. 1990 Apr;35(4):28-32
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-1990
Author
A M Dombrovskii
Source
Antibiot Khimioter. 1990 Apr;35(4):28-32
Date
Apr-1990
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Anti-Bacterial Agents - pharmacology
Child
Cross Infection - microbiology
Drug Resistance, Microbial
Escherichia coli - drug effects - genetics
Escherichia coli Infections - microbiology
Genotype
Humans
Microbial Sensitivity Tests
Moscow
Plasmids - drug effects
R Factors - drug effects - genetics
Salmonella Infections - microbiology
Salmonella typhimurium - drug effects - genetics
Abstract
Certain pheno- and genotype properties of S. typhimurium and some other representatives of Enterobacteriaceae resistant to antimicrobial drugs were studied. The strains were isolated from children with salmonellosis within 4 months when an infection hospital was subjected to microbiological observation. It was shown that by their antibiotic resistance, phagovars and molecular weights of the plasmid DNas, the strains S. typhimurium were similar to those isolated during hospital infections. The conjugative plasmids responsible for antibiotic resistance in some strains did not differ in their molecular weights and antibiotic resistance markers. The strains S. typhimurium similar in their pheno- and genotype properties were isolated only from 2 patients which allowed one to consider it possible that the patients were infected by the strains of common genesis. Analysis of nonpathogenic representatives of Enterobacteriaceae isolated from the patients along with the S. typhimurium strains confirmed the fact that the patients were infected with the same pathogenic strain.
PubMed ID
2200370 View in PubMed
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Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1964 May 30;126:618-22
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-30-1964
Author
J. MEYER
P. OXHOJ
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1964 May 30;126:618-22
Date
May-30-1964
Language
Danish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Denmark
Epidemiology
Salmonella food poisoning
Salmonella typhimurium
PubMed ID
14147555 View in PubMed
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An epidemic of Salmonella typhimurium infection among aircraft passengers.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature250371
Source
Scand J Infect Dis. 1977;9(3):175-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
1977
Author
E. Bäck
V. Romanus
L. Sjöberg
B. Svenungsson
M. Böttiger
L O Kallings
Source
Scand J Infect Dis. 1977;9(3):175-9
Date
1977
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aircraft
Disease Outbreaks
Feces - microbiology
Female
Humans
Male
Salmonella Food Poisoning - epidemiology
Salmonella typhimurium - isolation & purification
Scandinavia
Abstract
In February 1976 an outbreak of gastroenteritis occurred among 819 aircraft passengers to and from Gran Canaria. 360 of them had gastroenteritis and 88 were hospitalized. Fecal specimens were collected from 710 of the passengers and 344 of them were positive for Salmonella typhimurium phage type 15. Food served on the flight was the source of infection. The repeated incidences of this kind support the necessity of laying down rules and recommendations for the control of air catering services.
PubMed ID
333553 View in PubMed
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[An outbreak of hospital salmonellosis].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature203202
Source
Zh Mikrobiol Epidemiol Immunobiol. 1998 Nov-Dec;(6):115-6
Publication Type
Article

An outbreak of multidrug-resistant, quinolone-resistant Salmonella enterica serotype typhimurium DT104.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature33090
Source
N Engl J Med. 1999 Nov 4;341(19):1420-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-4-1999
Author
K. Mølbak
D L Baggesen
F M Aarestrup
J M Ebbesen
J. Engberg
K. Frydendahl
P. Gerner-Smidt
A M Petersen
H C Wegener
Author Affiliation
Statens Serum Institut, Copenhagen, Denmark.
Source
N Engl J Med. 1999 Nov 4;341(19):1420-5
Date
Nov-4-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Abattoirs
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Animals
Child
Denmark - epidemiology
Disease Outbreaks
Drug Resistance, Microbial
Drug Resistance, Multiple
Female
Humans
Infant
Male
Middle Aged
Occupational Diseases - epidemiology - microbiology
Quinolones
Salmonella Food Poisoning - epidemiology - microbiology - transmission
Salmonella typhimurium - classification - genetics - isolation & purification
Swine
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Food-borne salmonella infections have become a major problem in industrialized countries. The strain of Salmonella enterica serotype typhimurium known as definitive phage type 104 (DT104) is usually resistant to five drugs: ampicillin, chloramphenicol, streptomycin, sulfonamides, and tetracycline. An increasing proportion of DT104 isolates also have reduced susceptibility to fluoroquinolones. METHODS: The Danish salmonella surveillance program determines the phage types of all typhimurium strains from the food chain, and in the case of suspected outbreaks, five-drug-resistant strains are characterized by molecular methods. All patients infected with five-drug-resistant typhimurium are interviewed to obtain clinical and epidemiologic data. In 1998, an outbreak of salmonella occurred, in which the strain of typhimurium DT104 was new to Denmark. We investigated this outbreak and report here our findings. RESULTS: Until 1997, DT104 infections made up less than 1 percent of all human salmonella infections. The strain isolated from patients in the first community outbreak of DT104 in Denmark, in 1998 was resistant to nalidixic acid and had reduced susceptibility to fluoroquinolones. The outbreak included 25 culture-confirmed cases. Eleven patients were hospitalized, and two died. The molecular epidemiology and data from patients indicated that the primary source was a Danish swine herd. Furthermore, the investigation suggested reduced clinical effectiveness of treatment with fluoroquinolones. CONCLUSIONS: Our investigation of an outbreak of DT104 documented the spread of quinolone-resistant bacteria from food animals to humans; this spread was associated with infections that were difficult to treat. Because of the increase in quinolone resistance in salmonella, the use of fluoroquinolones in food animals should be restricted.
Notes
Comment In: N Engl J Med. 2000 Mar 2;342(9):66110702060
PubMed ID
10547404 View in PubMed
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An outbreak of Salmonella Typhimurium infections in Denmark, Norway and Sweden, 2008.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature151890
Source
Euro Surveill. 2009 Mar 12;14(10)
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-12-2009
Author
T. Bruun
G. Sørensen
L P Forshell
T. Jensen
K. Nygard
G. Kapperud
B A Lindstedt
T. Berglund
A. Wingstrand
R F Petersen
L. Müller
C. Kjelsø
S. Ivarsson
M. Hjertqvist
S. Löfdahl
S. Ethelberg
Author Affiliation
Norwegian Institute of Public Health, Oslo, Norway. Tone.Bruun@fhi.no
Source
Euro Surveill. 2009 Mar 12;14(10)
Date
Mar-12-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Denmark - epidemiology
Disease Outbreaks - statistics & numerical data
Food Contamination - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Incidence
Meat - microbiology
Norway - epidemiology
Population Surveillance
Risk Assessment - methods
Risk factors
Salmonella Food Poisoning - epidemiology - microbiology
Salmonella typhimurium - isolation & purification
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
In November-December 2008, Norway and Denmark independently identified outbreaks of Salmonella Typhimurium infections characterised in the multiple-locus variable number of tandem repeats analysis (MLVA) by a distinct profile. Outbreak investigations were initiated independently in the two countries. In Denmark, a total of 37 cases were identified, and multiple findings of the outbreak strain in pork and pigs within the same supply chain led to the identification of pork in various forms as the source. In Norway, ten cases were identified, and the outbreak investigation quickly indicated meat bought in Sweden as the probable source and the Swedish authorities were alerted. Investigations in Sweden identified four human cases and two isolates from minced meat with the distinct profile. Subsequent trace-back of the meat showed that it most likely originated from Denmark. Through international alert from Norway on 19 December, it became clear that the Danish and Norwegian outbreak strains were identical and, later on, that the source of the outbreaks in all three countries could be traced back to Danish pork. MLVA was instrumental in linking the outbreaks in the different countries and tracing the source. This outbreak illustrates that good international communication channels, early alerting mechanisms, inter-sectoral collaboration between public health and food safety authorities and harmonised molecular typing tools are important for effective identification and management of cross-border outbreaks. Differences in legal requirements for food safety in neighbouring countries may be a challenge in terms of communication with consumers in areas where cross-border shopping is common.
PubMed ID
19317986 View in PubMed
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[An outbreak of Salmonella typhimurium in the county of Funen during late summer. A case-controlled study]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature75586
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1997 Sep 1;159(36):5372-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1-1997
Author
K. Mølbak
D T Hald
Author Affiliation
Afdeling for mave-tarminfektioner, Statens Serum Institut, København.
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1997 Sep 1;159(36):5372-7
Date
Sep-1-1997
Language
Danish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Case-Control Studies
Denmark - epidemiology
Disease Outbreaks
English Abstract
Humans
Meat - microbiology
Salmonella Food Poisoning - epidemiology - microbiology
Salmonella typhimurium - isolation & purification
Swine
Abstract
An outbreak of Salmonella typhimurium infection, affecting 170 people in Funen, Denmark, was detected in late summer 1996. To detect risk factors for S. typhimurium infection and test the hypothesis that pork originating from a local slaughterhouse was the source, a matched case-control study of 47 cases and 89 controls was conducted. No single food item could be associated with S. typhimurium infection. However, of 29 cases, 24 (83%) had consumed pork which could be traced to the slaughterhouse. In comparison, 25 (46%) of 54 controls had consumed pork of the same origin (odds ratio: 6.7; 95% confidence interval: 1.8-23.5; p = 0.003). The results showed that consumption of pork from the concerned slaughterhouse was strongly associated with S. typhimurium infection.
PubMed ID
9304268 View in PubMed
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An outbreak of Salmonella Typhimurium traced back to salami, Denmark, April to June 2010.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature134350
Source
Euro Surveill. 2011;16(19)
Publication Type
Article
Date
2011
Author
Kg Kuhn
M. Torpdahl
C. Frank
K. Sigsgaard
S. Ethelberg
Author Affiliation
Department of Epidemiology, Statens Serum Institut, Copenhagen, Denmark. KUH@ssi.dk
Source
Euro Surveill. 2011;16(19)
Date
2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Case-Control Studies
Child
Child, Preschool
Confidence Intervals
Denmark - epidemiology
Disease Outbreaks
Female
Humans
Infant
Male
Meat - microbiology
Middle Aged
Salmonella Food Poisoning - epidemiology
Salmonella typhimurium - isolation & purification
Young Adult
Abstract
Between April and June 2010, a small national outbreak of Salmonella Typhimurium with a particular multilocus variable-number tandem repeat analysis (MLVA) type was identified in Denmark through laboratory-based surveillance. The outbreak involved twenty cases, primarily living within the greater Copenhagen area. Half of the cases were children aged ten years or younger and 12 were male; three cases were hospitalised.A matched case-control study showed a strong link between illness and eating a particular salami product containing pork and venison, matched odds ratio(mOR):150, confidence interval (CI): 19?1,600. The salami had been produced in Germany. Microbiological confirmation in food samples was sought but not obtained. Danish consumers were notified that they should return or dispose of any packages from the suspected salami batch. Because the salami product had potentially been sold in other European countries, the European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control urgent enquiry and Rapid Alert System for Food and Feed systems were used to highlight the possibility of outbreaks in these countries. Case-control studies area strong tool in some outbreak investigations and evidence from such studies may give sufficient information to recall a food product.
PubMed ID
21596006 View in PubMed
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131 records – page 1 of 14.