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[Analysis of plasmid profile of antibiotic-resistant Enterobacteriaceae circulating in hospitals].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature229366
Source
Antibiot Khimioter. 1990 Apr;35(4):28-32
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-1990
Author
A M Dombrovskii
Source
Antibiot Khimioter. 1990 Apr;35(4):28-32
Date
Apr-1990
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Anti-Bacterial Agents - pharmacology
Child
Cross Infection - microbiology
Drug Resistance, Microbial
Escherichia coli - drug effects - genetics
Escherichia coli Infections - microbiology
Genotype
Humans
Microbial Sensitivity Tests
Moscow
Plasmids - drug effects
R Factors - drug effects - genetics
Salmonella Infections - microbiology
Salmonella typhimurium - drug effects - genetics
Abstract
Certain pheno- and genotype properties of S. typhimurium and some other representatives of Enterobacteriaceae resistant to antimicrobial drugs were studied. The strains were isolated from children with salmonellosis within 4 months when an infection hospital was subjected to microbiological observation. It was shown that by their antibiotic resistance, phagovars and molecular weights of the plasmid DNas, the strains S. typhimurium were similar to those isolated during hospital infections. The conjugative plasmids responsible for antibiotic resistance in some strains did not differ in their molecular weights and antibiotic resistance markers. The strains S. typhimurium similar in their pheno- and genotype properties were isolated only from 2 patients which allowed one to consider it possible that the patients were infected by the strains of common genesis. Analysis of nonpathogenic representatives of Enterobacteriaceae isolated from the patients along with the S. typhimurium strains confirmed the fact that the patients were infected with the same pathogenic strain.
PubMed ID
2200370 View in PubMed
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[A new serotype of Salmonella isolated in Canada: Salmonella montreal (43(1), 43(2):c:1 5)].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature250824
Source
Can J Microbiol. 1976 Aug;22(8):1196-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-1976

[Biological characteristics of Salmonella typhimurium obtained from different sources 1975-1980].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature242168
Source
Zh Mikrobiol Epidemiol Immunobiol. 1983 Mar;(3):26-32
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-1983
Author
I N Kamenskaia
E Iu Markina
N A Chernysheva
Z N Ermolenko
Source
Zh Mikrobiol Epidemiol Immunobiol. 1983 Mar;(3):26-32
Date
Mar-1983
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Animals
Carrier State - microbiology
Chick Embryo
Cross Infection - microbiology
Drug Resistance, Microbial
Guinea Pigs
Humans
Infant
Mice
Microbial Sensitivity Tests
Moscow
Salmonella Infections - microbiology
Salmonella Infections, Animal - microbiology
Salmonella typhimurium - isolation & purification - pathogenicity - physiology
Virulence
Abstract
Distinct differences in a number of biological properties between S. typhimurium hospital strains and cultures of animal origin have been revealed. During 1975-1980 changes in the fermentation of lysine were observed in hospital strains and the retarded fermentation of sorbitol was revealed in strains of animal origin. S. typhimurium 1R, a new highly virulent biovariant resistant to antibiotics, and enzymatic varieties of biovar 11S were isolated. The nonstability of enzymatic differences between hospital strains and cultures of animal origin necessitates their constant observation in order to differentiate these cultures for the purpose of epidemic analysis. Complete correlation between the properties of cultures circulating on a limited territory and the character of morbidity in Salmonella infection demonstrates the epidemiological importance of the intraspecific differentiation tests under study.
PubMed ID
6342309 View in PubMed
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[Biological properties of the causative agents of salmonellosis in children]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature42362
Source
Pediatr Akus Ginekol. 1976 Mar-Apr;(2):23-4
Publication Type
Article

Characterization of Canadian cefoxitin-resistant non-typhoidal Salmonella isolates, 2005-06.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature149452
Source
J Antimicrob Chemother. 2009 Oct;64(4):723-30
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2009
Author
L F Mataseje
J. Xiao
S. Kost
L-K Ng
K. Doré
M R Mulvey
Author Affiliation
University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Canada.
Source
J Antimicrob Chemother. 2009 Oct;64(4):723-30
Date
Oct-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Anti-Bacterial Agents - pharmacology
Canada
Cefoxitin - pharmacology
DNA, Bacterial - chemistry - genetics
Drug Resistance, Bacterial
Female
Genes, Bacterial
Genotype
Humans
Male
Microbial Sensitivity Tests
Middle Aged
Plasmids - analysis - classification
Polymerase Chain Reaction
Polymorphism, Restriction Fragment Length
Replicon
Salmonella - classification - drug effects - isolation & purification
Salmonella Infections - microbiology
Sequence Analysis, DNA
Young Adult
Abstract
Resistance to extended-spectrum cephalosporins has increased in Salmonella worldwide, and is a concern in both hospital and community settings. The aim of this report was to investigate cefoxitin-resistant Salmonella isolates identified from human clinical cases across Canada.
Cefoxitin-resistant isolates, defined as having an MIC > or = 32 mg/L, were screened for the ampC classes DHA, FOX, ENT and CIT in a multiplex PCR followed by sequence analysis. Plasmid analysis by restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) and replicon typing was performed on a convenience sample of cefoxitin-resistant Salmonella.
In 2005, 5.3% (181/3442) and in 2006, 3.1% (102/3250) of Salmonella isolates collected from all provinces across Canada displayed cefoxitin resistance. Seventy-one out of 283 (25.1%) were multidrug resistant (MDR), as defined by resistance to at least three different antibiotic classes. The bla(CMY-2) gene was harboured by 96.8% (274/283) of the cefoxitin-resistant isolates. Analysis of CMY-2 plasmids revealed that 19.7% contained genes conferring resistance to multiple antimicrobials. Replicon typing of transformant CMY-2 plasmid DNA revealed the predominance of I1-Igamma and A/C. Of the MDR CMY-2 plasmids, 75% contained replicon type A/C. RFLP patterns of CMY-2 plasmids revealed clusters corresponding to the I1-Igamma and A/C replicon types.
Incompatibility group I1-Igamma is the most prevalent of the Salmonella CMY-2 plasmids, while A/C is associated with MDR CMY-2 plasmids.
PubMed ID
19638354 View in PubMed
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The characterization of Danish isolates of Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis by phage typing and plasmid profiling: 1980-1990.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature218662
Source
APMIS. 1994 Mar;102(3):208-14
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-1994
Author
D J Brown
D L Baggesen
H B Hansen
H C Hansen
M. Bisgaard
Author Affiliation
Department of Veterinary Microbiology, Royal Veterinary and Agricultural University, Frederiksberg, Denmark.
Source
APMIS. 1994 Mar;102(3):208-14
Date
Mar-1994
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Anti-Bacterial Agents - toxicity
Anti-Infective Agents - toxicity
Chickens
Denmark
Humans
Microbial Sensitivity Tests
Plasmids
Poultry Diseases
Retrospective Studies
Salmonella Infections - microbiology
Salmonella Infections, Animal - microbiology
Salmonella Phages - classification - isolation & purification
Salmonella enteritidis - classification - drug effects - isolation & purification
Abstract
Plasmid profiling, phage typing and antimicrobial resistance typing have been carried out on 736 isolates of Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis collected in Denmark during the period 1980 to 1990. Strains originated from cases of human salmonellosis, broiler poultry flocks, layer poultry flocks, quarantined imported poultry, environmental samples from hatchery units, and from bovines. Phage type (PT) 1 was found to be the most common type among isolates of poultry origin (57.6%) followed by PT4 (28.8%). Isolates belonging to PT8 were found exclusively in imported birds. Phage typing of a representative sample of human isolates revealed the predominance, as in most other Western European countries, of PT4 (61.8%). PT1, however, was found in 17.0% of human strains, a much higher incidence than expected. Antibiotic resistance was observed in 4 out of 107 human isolates (3.7%) and 2 out of 205 non-human isolates (1%) tested.
PubMed ID
8185887 View in PubMed
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Characterization of Salmonella Typhimurium isolates from domestically acquired infections in Finland by phage typing, antimicrobial susceptibility testing, PFGE and MLVA.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature270445
Source
BMC Microbiol. 2015;15:131
Publication Type
Article
Date
2015
Author
Taru Lienemann
Aino Kyyhkynen
Jani Halkilahti
Kaisa Haukka
Anja Siitonen
Source
BMC Microbiol. 2015;15:131
Date
2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Anti-Bacterial Agents - pharmacology
Bacterial Typing Techniques - methods
Bacteriophage Typing
DNA, Bacterial - analysis
Finland
Humans
Microbial Sensitivity Tests
Minisatellite Repeats
Multilocus Sequence Typing
Phylogeny
Salmonella Infections - microbiology
Salmonella typhimurium - classification - drug effects - isolation & purification
Abstract
Salmonella enterica spp. enterica serotype Typhimurium (STM) is the most common agent of domestically acquired salmonellosis in Finland. Subtyping methods which allow the characterization of STM are essential for effective laboratory-based STM surveillance and for recognition of outbreaks. This study describes the diversity of Finnish STM isolates using phage typing, antimicrobial susceptible testing, pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) and multilocus variable-number tandem repeat analysis (MLVA), and compares the discriminatory power and the concordance of these methods.
A total of 375 sporadic STM isolates were analysed. The isolates were divided into 31 definite phage (DT) types, dominated by DT1 (47 % of the isolates), U277 (9 % of the isolates) and DT104 (8 % of the isolates). Of all the isolates, 62 % were susceptible to all the 12 antimicrobials tested and 11 % were multidrug resistant. Subtyping resulted in 83 different XbaI-PFGE profiles and 111 MLVA types. The three most common XbaI-PFGE profiles (STYM1, STYM7 and STYM8) and one MLVA profile with three single locus variants accounted for 56 % and 49 % of the STM isolates, respectively. The studied isolates showed a genetic similarity of more than 70 % by XbaI-PFGE. In MLVA, 71 % of the isolates lacked STTR6 and 77 % missed STTR10p loci. Nevertheless, the calculated Simpson's diversity index for XbaI-PFGE was 0.829 (95 % CI 0.792-0.865) and for MLVA 0.867 (95 % CI 0.835-0.898). However, the discriminatory power of the 5-loci MLVA varied among the phage types. The highest concordance of the results was found between XbaI-PFGE and phage typing (adjusted Wallace coefficient was 0.833 and adjusted Rand coefficient was 0.627).
In general, the calculated discriminatory power was higher for genotyping methods (MLVA and XbaI-PFGE) than for phenotyping methods (phage typing). Overall, comparable diversity indices were calculated for PFGE and MLVA (both DI?>?0.8). However, MLVA was phage type dependent providing better discrimination of the most common phage types. Furthermore, 5-loci MLVA was a less laborious method and easier to interpret than XbaI-PFGE. Thus, the laboratory-based surveillance of the Finnish human STM infections has been conducted with a combination of phage typing, antimicrobial susceptibility testing and 5-loci MLVA since January 2014.
Notes
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PubMed ID
26129826 View in PubMed
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[Clinical aspects of salmonella infections in children]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature44660
Source
Pediatr Akus Ginekol. 1968;3:11-3
Publication Type
Article
Date
1968

[Clinical bacteriological characteristics of Salmonella typhimurium infection in newborn infants]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature60699
Source
Pediatr Akus Ginekol. 1978 Nov-Dec;(6):3-4
Publication Type
Article

Comparison of CMY-2 plasmids isolated from human, animal, and environmental Escherichia coli and Salmonella spp. from Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature142087
Source
Diagn Microbiol Infect Dis. 2010 Aug;67(4):387-91
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2010
Author
Laura F Mataseje
Patricia J Baudry
Goerge G Zhanel
Douglas W Morck
Ron R Read
Marie Louie
Michael R Mulvey
Author Affiliation
National Microbiology Laboratory, Public Health Agency of Canada, Winnipeg, Canada R3E 3R2.
Source
Diagn Microbiol Infect Dis. 2010 Aug;67(4):387-91
Date
Aug-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Canada
Environmental Microbiology
Escherichia coli - enzymology - genetics - isolation & purification
Escherichia coli Infections - microbiology - veterinary
Humans
Plasmids - classification - isolation & purification
Replicon
Salmonella - enzymology - genetics - isolation & purification
Salmonella Infections - microbiology
Salmonella Infections, Animal
beta-Lactamases - biosynthesis
Abstract
A total of 244 CMY-2 plasmids from 5 separate studies involving Escherichia coli and Salmonella human clinical cases as well as E. coli from feedlots and water sources were examined. Genetically similar CMY-2 plasmids isolated from either E. coli or Salmonella from human, animal, and environmental sources are widely distributed across Canada and cluster into replicon types I1, A/C, and K/B and an unidentified group.
PubMed ID
20638610 View in PubMed
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25 records – page 1 of 3.