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Campylobacter, Salmonella, and Yersinia antibodies and pregnancy outcome in Danish women with occupational exposure to animals.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature268495
Source
Int J Infect Dis. 2014 Nov;28:74-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2014
Author
Bjørn Kantsø
Anne-Marie Nybo Andersen
Kåre Mølbak
Karen Angeliki Krogfelt
Tine Brink Henriksen
Stine Yde Nielsen
Source
Int J Infect Dis. 2014 Nov;28:74-9
Date
Nov-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Abortion, Spontaneous - epidemiology
Adult
Animals
Animals, Domestic
Antibodies, Bacterial - blood
Birth weight
Campylobacter - immunology
Denmark
Female
Gestational Age
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Occupational Exposure - adverse effects
Pregnancy
Pregnancy outcome
Premature Birth - epidemiology
Risk factors
Salmonella - immunology
Yersinia - immunology
Abstract
The aim of this study was to determine antibody titres against Campylobacter, Salmonella, and Yersinia in a population-based cohort of pregnant women in Denmark in order to evaluate adverse pregnancy outcomes (miscarriage, preterm birth, and small for gestational age) in relation to occupational exposure to animals in women exposed to food producing animals.
We used data and blood samples from the Danish National Birth Cohort. Serum samples collected during the first trimester from 192 pregnant women who were occupationally exposed to domestic animals and 188 randomly selected unexposed pregnant women were analysed for IgG, IgM, and IgA antibodies against Campylobacter, Salmonella, and Yersinia. Pregnancy outcomes of interest were identified through the Danish National Patient Register.
Women with occupational exposure to animals had significantly higher IgG antibody concentrations against Campylobacter, Salmonella, and Yersinia, whereas they had lower concentrations of IgM and IgA antibodies.
Serological markers were not identified as risk factors for adverse pregnancy outcomes, with the exception of elevated concentrations of Salmonella antibodies, which were found to be associated with an increased risk of preterm birth.
PubMed ID
25245002 View in PubMed
Less detail

Factors influencing Salmonella carcass prevalence in Danish pig abattoirs.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature100580
Source
Prev Vet Med. 2010 Jul 1;95(3-4):231-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-1-2010
Author
F M Baptista
J. Dahl
L R Nielsen
Author Affiliation
Department of Large Animal Sciences, Faculty of Life Sciences, University of Copenhagen, Grønnegårdsvej 8, DK-1870 Frederiksberg C, Denmark. baptista@life.ku.dk
Source
Prev Vet Med. 2010 Jul 1;95(3-4):231-8
Date
Jul-1-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Abattoirs - standards
Animals
Antibodies, Bacterial - blood
Denmark - epidemiology
Hygiene
Prevalence
Risk factors
Salmonella - immunology
Salmonella Food Poisoning - prevention & control
Salmonella Infections, Animal - epidemiology
Sentinel Surveillance - veterinary
Seroepidemiologic Studies
Swine
Swine Diseases - epidemiology
Abstract
The Danish Salmonella Surveillance-and-Control Programme in finisher pigs includes both herd and carcass surveillance. Herd surveillance consists of serological testing of meat-juice samples and classification of herds into three Salmonella seroprevalence levels. At the abattoirs, carcass swabs from five pigs are collected daily and analysed as a pooled sample to evaluate the Salmonella carcass prevalence. This study aimed to investigate factors associated with Salmonella carcass prevalence in Denmark. A total of 20,196 pooled carcass swabs collected in 23 Danish abattoirs were included in the analysis. A multilevel logistic regression model was used taking into account the two-level data structure (abattoir, carcass pool) and adjusting the parameter estimates to the random variation at the abattoir level. Study results indicated that carcass contamination was mainly influenced by the probability that at least one pig contributing to the pool was seropositive, the log-transformed number of seropositive pigs delivered to the abattoir on the same day and weekday. No other factors were found to be significant (P>0.05). Large reductions in the number of seropositive pigs delivered to slaughter are unlikely to result in large reductions of the Salmonella carcass prevalence, unless the number of seropositive pigs can be kept below approximately 200. On average, individual Salmonella carcass prevalence can be kept below 1% by keeping a Salmonella input to the abattoir below approximately 50 seropositive pigs. Variation between abattoirs suggested that improved hygiene practices in some of the abattoirs would reduce the Salmonella carcass prevalence further.
PubMed ID
20537741 View in PubMed
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Lipopolysaccharide induces CD25-positive, IL-10-producing lymphocytes without secretion of proinflammatory cytokines in the human colon: low MD-2 mRNA expression in colonic macrophages.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature181304
Source
J Clin Immunol. 2004 Jan;24(1):42-52
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2004
Author
Yuko Shirai
Masahito Hashimoto
Rie Kato
Yuki I Kawamura
Teruo Kirikae
Hideaki Yano
Junya Takashima
Yujiro Kirihara
Yukio Saito
Masayuki A Fujino
Taeko Dohi
Author Affiliation
Department of Gastroenterology, Research Institute, International Medical Center of Japan, 1-21-1 Toyama, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo 162-8655, Japan.
Source
J Clin Immunol. 2004 Jan;24(1):42-52
Date
Jan-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Antigens, CD - immunology
Antigens, Differentiation, Myelomonocytic - immunology
Antigens, Surface - genetics - metabolism
Bacteroides fragilis - immunology - metabolism
CD4-Positive T-Lymphocytes - immunology - metabolism
Colon - immunology - metabolism
Cytokines - immunology - metabolism
Humans
Interleukin-10 - immunology - metabolism
Lipopolysaccharides - immunology - metabolism
Lymphocyte Antigen 96
Lymphocytes - immunology - metabolism
Macrophages - immunology - metabolism
RNA, Messenger - metabolism
Receptors, Interleukin-2 - immunology - metabolism
Salmonella - immunology - metabolism
Sialic Acid Binding Ig-like Lectin 3
Abstract
Despite the huge number of colonized Gram-negative bacteria in the colon, the normal colon maintains its homeostasis without any excessive immune response. To investigate the potential mechanisms involved, human colonic lamina propria mononuclear cells (LPMCs) obtained from uninflamed mucosa were cultured with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) prepared from Bacteroides vulgatus (BV-LPS) or Bacteroides fragilis (BF-LPS), as representatives of indigenous flora, or pathogenic Salmonella minnesota (SM-LPS). Colonic LPMCs failed to produce inflammatory cytokines in response to any type of LPS. Colonic macrophages barely expressed mRNA for MD-2, an essential association molecule for LPS signaling via Toll-like receptor 4. Further, BV-LPS induced CD25 and Foxp3 expression in lymphocytes and CD4(+)CD25(+) cells expressed IL-10 mRNA. Thus, the low expression of functioning LPS receptor molecules and induction of IL-10-producing CD4(+)CD25(+) lymphocytes by indigenous LPS may play a central role in the maintenance of colonic immunological homeostasis.
PubMed ID
14997033 View in PubMed
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Rapid decay of Salmonella flagella antibodies during human gastroenteritis: a follow up study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature29613
Source
J Microbiol Methods. 2005 Aug;62(2):233-43
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2005
Author
Tine Dalby
Mette A Strid
Natascha H Beyer
Jens Blom
Kåre Mølbak
Karen A Krogfelt
Author Affiliation
Unit of Gastrointestinal Infections, Statens Serum Institut, DK-2300 S Copenhagen, Denmark.
Source
J Microbiol Methods. 2005 Aug;62(2):233-43
Date
Aug-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Antibodies, Bacterial - blood
Antigens, Bacterial - immunology - ultrastructure
Child
Denmark
Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay
Female
Flagella - immunology - microbiology - ultrastructure
Follow-Up Studies
Gastroenteritis - immunology - microbiology
Humans
Male
Microscopy, Electron
Middle Aged
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Salmonella - immunology
Salmonella Infections - immunology - microbiology
Salmonella enteritidis - immunology
Salmonella typhimurium - immunology
Spectrum Analysis, Mass
Abstract
An indirect enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) based on Salmonella re-polymerized flagella was employed to measure levels of immunoglobulin (Ig) G, IgM and IgA antibodies in sera from 303 Danish patients diagnosed with either Salmonella enteritidis or Salmonella typhimurium. The antibody-levels were assessed at one, three and six months after onset of salmonellosis, and sera from a control-group of 170 healthy blood donors were additionally analysed in order to establish cut-off values for the analysis. Cross-reactions to other Salmonella serotypes, as well as to Escherichia coli, Yersinia enterocolitica, Campylobacter jejuni, Campylobacter coli and Helicobacter pylori were observed. At one month after onset of symptoms, 70% of the patients recovering from a S. enteritidis infection carried detectable levels of anti-flagella antibodies, as did 77% of the patients recovering from S. typhimurium infection. Three months after onset of symptoms these detection rates had decreased to 46% and 40%; and six months after onset of symptoms the detection rates were 34% and 38%. This rapid decrease in the serum levels of flagella antibodies is in conflict with the "common knowledge" statement of a long-lasting anti-flagella immunoresponse. The present study suggests that such a tenacious statement is (or may be) inaccurate.
PubMed ID
16009280 View in PubMed
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Salmonella infections in ninety Alberta swine finishing farms: serological prevalence, correlation between culture and serology, and risk factors for infection.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature162748
Source
Foodborne Pathog Dis. 2007;4(2):169-77
Publication Type
Article
Date
2007
Author
Andrijana Rajic
Eva Y W Chow
John T Y Wu
Anne E Deckert
Richard Reid-Smith
Ken Manninen
Catherine E Dewey
Manon Fleury
Scott A McEwen
Author Affiliation
Department of Population Medicine, University of Guelph, Ontario, Canada. andrijana_rajic@phac-aspc.gc.ca
Source
Foodborne Pathog Dis. 2007;4(2):169-77
Date
2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alberta - epidemiology
Animals
Antibodies, Bacterial - blood
Consumer Product Safety
Feces - microbiology
Humans
Meat - microbiology
Risk factors
Salmonella - immunology - isolation & purification
Salmonella Infections, Animal - epidemiology - transmission
Seroepidemiologic Studies
Swine
Swine Diseases - epidemiology - transmission
Abstract
The aim of this study was to determine serological prevalence for Salmonella in 90 Alberta finishing swine farms over a 5-month period; to evaluate the correlation between the detection of Salmonella by bacteriological culture and serology; and to identify risk factors for Salmonella seroprevalence. Participating farms were visited 3 times. A total of 30 blood and 15 fecal samples were collected from finishing pigs on each farm. VetScreen Salmonella covalent mix-ELISA (Svanovir) and conventional culture were performed. The apparent Salmonella seroprevalences at the sample and farm level were 13.2% (95% confidence interval [CI], 10.5-15.5%) and 83.3% (95% CI, 74-90.4%), respectively. Most of the farms had within-farm seroprevalence of
PubMed ID
17600484 View in PubMed
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Salmonella isolated from humans, animals and other sources in Canada, 1983-92.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature207805
Source
Epidemiol Infect. 1997 Aug;119(1):15-23
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-1997
Author
R. Khakhria
D. Woodward
W M Johnson
C. Poppe
Author Affiliation
National Laboratory for Enteric Pathogens, Health Canada, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada.
Source
Epidemiol Infect. 1997 Aug;119(1):15-23
Date
Aug-1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Bacterial Typing Techniques
Canada - epidemiology
Cattle
Chickens
Disease Outbreaks
Food Microbiology
Humans
Incidence
Meat - microbiology
Population Surveillance
Poultry - microbiology
Prevalence
Salmonella - immunology - isolation & purification
Salmonella Infections - epidemiology - microbiology
Seroepidemiologic Studies
Swine
Travel
Abstract
A total of 89760 human and 22551 non-human isolates of salmonella were serotyped in Canada during the period 1983-92. There were 2180 reported outbreaks associated with 10065 cases during the 10-year period. The most common salmonella serovars isolated from human and non-human sources were S. typhimurium and S. hadar. The third and fourth most common serovars from human sources were S. enteritidis and S. heidelberg, respectively, and from non-human sources they were S. heidelberg and S. infantis. The number of S. typhimurium isolations from human and non-human sources showed a downward trend over the 10-year period. A total of 222 outbreaks of S. typhimurium associated with 1622 cases occurred. The S. hadar isolations from human and non-human sources reached a peak during the years 1987-90 and declined thereafter. The number of human isolates of S. enteritidis increased until 1985 and fluctuated at a level of 8.3-12.8% of all human isolates thereafter. Seventy-three outbreaks of S. enteritidis infection associated with 568 cases occurred. More than 50% of the S. enteritidis infections in humans were caused by phage type (PT) 8. During the review period, infections caused by PT4 were less common and were almost exclusively found in people who had travelled abroad. The annual isolation rates of S. heidelberg from human and non-human sources increased steadily during the period. Bacteriophage typing of serovars from outbreaks showed that contaminated food products of poultry and bovine origin were common sources of human infection. Salmonella typhi was identified as the cause of 43 small outbreaks affecting 116 persons.
PubMed ID
9287938 View in PubMed
Less detail

Seroprevalence of antibodies to Salmonella spp in semidomesticated reindeer in Norway, determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature57449
Source
Berl Munch Tierarztl Wochenschr. 2002 Sep-Oct;115(9-10):351-4
Publication Type
Article
Author
Ansgar Aschfalk
Sabine Laude
Nicolai Denzin
Author Affiliation
Norwegian School of Veterinary Science, Department of Arctic Veterinary Medicine, 9292 Tromsø, Norway. Ansgar.Aschfalk@veths.no
Source
Berl Munch Tierarztl Wochenschr. 2002 Sep-Oct;115(9-10):351-4
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Antibodies, Bacterial - blood
Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay - methods - veterinary
Norway - epidemiology
Pilot Projects
Reindeer
Salmonella - immunology
Salmonella Infections, Animal - blood - epidemiology
Seroepidemiologic Studies
Abstract
An indirect ELISA was developed as a possible tool to detect the seroprevalence of antibodies to Salmonella spp in semidomesticated reindeer. To cover a broad spectrum of serogroups a lipopolysaccharide mix of S. typhimurium and S. choleraesuis was used as antigen in this pilot study. Sera from 31 culture-negative reindeer with no clinical or historical evidence of salmonellosis were used as negative serum control. After immunisation with an inactivated S. typhimurium vaccine, pooled sera from 6 reindeer were used as positive serum control as no serum from naturally infected animals was available. A seroprevalence of 0.6% in 2000 clinically healthy, slaughter-reindeer from Norway was determined by using this ELISA. No more information on Salmonella in reindeer in Norway is known to the authors. This is the first ELISA established for indirect detection of Salmonella in reindeer.
PubMed ID
12357671 View in PubMed
Less detail

Studies of human milk. II. Concentration of antibodies against Salmonella and Shigella in milk of women from different populations and the daily intake by their breast-fed infants.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature39564
Source
Acta Paediatr Scand. 1985 May;74(3):338-41
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-1985
Author
J R Cruz
B V Carlsson
Y. Hofvander
D T Holme
L A Hanson
Source
Acta Paediatr Scand. 1985 May;74(3):338-41
Date
May-1985
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Breast Feeding
Comparative Study
Female
Guatemala
Humans
Immunoglobulin A, Secretory - analysis
Infant, Newborn
Milk, Human - immunology
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Salmonella - immunology
Shigella - immunology
Socioeconomic Factors
Sweden
Abstract
The concentration in human milk of IgA antibodies against six Salmonella and two Shigella groups were determined in specimens obtained from Swedish and Guatemalan nursing mothers of three different socioeconomic levels. The daily intakes of milk antibodies by their children were also estimated. The results show that the concentrations of specific IgA antibodies in milk vary among the different population groups. There is, however, no difference in daily intake of specific IgA by the children.
PubMed ID
4003057 View in PubMed
Less detail

Trends and seasonal variations in the occurrence of Salmonella in pigs, pork and humans in Denmark, 1995-2000.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature193172
Source
Berl Munch Tierarztl Wochenschr. 2001 Sep-Oct;114(9-10):346-9
Publication Type
Article
Author
T. Hald
J S Andersen
Author Affiliation
Danish Veterinary Laboratory, 27 Bülowsvej, DK-1790 Copenhagen V, Denmark. tih@svs.dk
Source
Berl Munch Tierarztl Wochenschr. 2001 Sep-Oct;114(9-10):346-9
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Abattoirs
Animals
Antibodies, Bacterial - blood
Denmark - epidemiology
Humans
Incidence
Linear Models
Meat - microbiology
Poisson Distribution
Prevalence
Regression Analysis
Salmonella - immunology
Salmonella Infections - epidemiology
Salmonella Infections, Animal - epidemiology
Seasons
Seroepidemiologic Studies
Swine
Swine Diseases - epidemiology
Temperature
Time Factors
Zoonoses
Abstract
A mandatory programme monitoring the occurrence of Salmonella in pork at slaughterhouses and a serological monitoring of slaughter-pig herds has been implemented in Denmark since 1993 and 1995, respectively. All results are stored in a central database. From this, aggregated weekly results of serological and bacteriological samples collected in the period between January 1995 and July 2000 were extracted. In addition, the reported weekly incidence of human infections with S. Typhimurium covering the same time period was obtained. The times series were analysed for trends and cyclic variations by seasonal decomposition. The association between the incidence in humans and the prevalence of Salmonella in pigs and pork, and prevailing weather conditions, were analysed by using a general linear (glm) and a general additive model (gam). Explanatory variables were lagged to account for time elapsed between sampling, consumption, incubation period and case registration. The results of the seasonal decomposition showed an overall declining trend in all three time series. All time series exhibited a double peaked annual cycle. The seasonal variation of the prevalence in pork and the human incidence had a very similar course. The variables that were both biologically meaningful and statistically significant in both regression models were the prevalence in pork sampled 4 to 5 weeks before case registration, the seroprevalence, measured as the average prevalence of week 15 to 35 before case registration, and the air temperature lagged at 2 and 3 weeks. Limitations on inferences from overall surveillance data are discussed.
PubMed ID
11570174 View in PubMed
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10 records – page 1 of 1.