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672 records – page 1 of 68.

[A comparative analysis of the Salmonella typhi strains isolated from patients and bacterial carriers]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature70360
Source
Zh Mikrobiol Epidemiol Immunobiol. 1989 Dec;(12):8-11
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1989
Author
L E Riabchenko
L A Riapis
L M Sladkova
E I Vostrova
Iu V Kravtsov
Source
Zh Mikrobiol Epidemiol Immunobiol. 1989 Dec;(12):8-11
Date
Dec-1989
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Anti-Bacterial Agents - pharmacology
Antigens, Bacterial - analysis
Bacteriophage Typing
Carrier State - microbiology
Comparative Study
Drug Resistance, Microbial
English Abstract
Humans
Microbial Sensitivity Tests
Molecular Weight
Plasmids - genetics
Salmonella typhi - classification - genetics - immunology - isolation & purification - pathogenicity
Typhoid Fever - microbiology
Ukraine
Virulence
Abstract
The comparative analysis of 133 S. typhi clinical strains isolated from patients and carriers in Dnepropetrovsk Province in 1978-1987 was carried out. As shown by this analysis, 10 Vi phage types were represented in the set of strains under study, phage types A and F1 being the most numerous ones. Phage type F1 occurred less frequently among the strains isolated from carriers. 31.1% of the strains were found to contain plasmids with different molecular weight ranging from 96 to 0.5 MD. The occurrence of plasmid-containing strains remained at the same level during the whole period under study. Low-molecular plasmids occurred more frequently in the strains isolated from carriers. The minimal suppressive concentrations of a number of antibiotics, such as penicillin, ampicillin, monomycin, chloramphenicol, tetracycline, rifampicin and streptomycin, were determined. 7% of the strains were resistant to penicillin, 9% to monomycin, 15%--to tetracycline and 2.6% to chloramphenicol. The correlation between penicillin and monomycin resistance of the strains and the presence of the plasmid with a molecular weight of 60 MD in these strains was established. All strains were shown to be highly variable in the degree of their virulence: from 10(2) to 10(8). The strains isolated from patients possessed greater virulence.
PubMed ID
2629429 View in PubMed
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Acute intestinal disease in the Arctic.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature956
Source
Journal of Public Health. 49(11):1441-1453.
Publication Type
Article
Date
1959
Author
Gordon, J.E.
Babbott, Jr., F.L.
Author Affiliation
Harvard University
Source
Journal of Public Health. 49(11):1441-1453.
Date
1959
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Publication Type
Article
Physical Holding
Alaska Medical Library
Keywords
Bethel
Wainwright
Kotzebue
Diarrhea
Carrier state
Seasonal periodicity
Typhoid
Shigella spp.
Dysentery
Salmonella spp.
Paratyphoid
Zoonosis
Notes
From: Fortuine, Robert et al. 1993. The Health of the Inuit of North America: A Bibliography from the Earliest Times through 1990. University of Alaska Anchorage. Citation number 1705.
Cited in: Fortuine, Robert. 1968. The Health of the Eskimos: a bibliography 1857-1967. Dartmouth College Libraries. Citation number 681.
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Acute intestinal infection in Alaska

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature955
Source
Public Health Reports. 1959 Jan;74(1):49-54
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-1959
  1 website  
Author
Gordon, J.E.
Babbott, Jr., F.L.
Author Affiliation
Harvard University
Source
Public Health Reports. 1959 Jan;74(1):49-54
Date
Jan-1959
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Publication Type
Article
Physical Holding
Alaska Medical Library
Keywords
Bethel
Carrier state
Diarrhea
Kwethluk
Napaskiak
Salmonella spp.
Shigella spp.
Typhoid
Wainwright
Abstract
The intestinal infections are an attractive starting place in arctic epidemiology because the mass behavior of these diseases has been well worked out through long study in temperate and tropical regions. Also, the required bacteriological procedures are relatively simple, a consideration of moment in the arctic where field conditions are as difficult as they are. Alaska was chosen as the first study area. As a cultural and administrative part of the United States, conditions were good for communication and cooperation.The primary purpose was to determine under arctic conditions the mode of transmission of acute infectious diarrhea of man, and to learn something of prevalence and seasonal incidence. Also, intestinal parasites of dog and man were surveyed in two villages, and the ecology of fish tapeworm was examined in one area.
Notes
From: Fortuine, Robert et al. 1993. The Health of the Inuit of North America: A Bibliography from the Earliest Times through 1990. University of Alaska Anchorage. Citation number 1706.
Cited in: Fortuine, Robert. 1968. The Health of the Eskimos: a bibliography 1857-1967. Dartmouth College Libraries. Citation number 682.
Online Resources
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[Acute intestinal infections in children in areas with industrial environmental air pollution].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature183961
Source
Gig Sanit. 2003 Jul-Aug;(4):6-8
Publication Type
Article
Author
E D Savilov
E B Shcherbakova
Source
Gig Sanit. 2003 Jul-Aug;(4):6-8
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acute Disease
Air Pollutants - adverse effects
Catchment Area (Health)
Child
Dysentery, Bacillary - epidemiology
Environmental Pollution - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Incidence
Industry
Russia - epidemiology
Salmonella Infections - epidemiology
Abstract
Acute intestinal infections were clinically and epidemiologically studied in children residing in the towns with different quantitative and qualitative composition of ambient air pollutants and in the districts of a town, which differ in the level of technogenic ambient air pollution. Six hundred and eighty patients with different types of shigellosis and 421 patients with salmonellosis admitted to the infection hospitals of the towns of Angarsk (an intensively polluted locality) and Irkutsk (a better ecological area) were examined in 1995 to 2000. The technogenic ambient air pollution was found to exert a noticeable impact on the incidence with S. sonnei dysentery. In poor environmental areas, all the infections under study are characterized by a great burden, duration, more severe clinical symptoms, and poor laboratory changes in the presence of a decreased responsiveness.
PubMed ID
12934271 View in PubMed
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Acute toxoplasmosis in three wild arctic foxes (Alopex lagopus) from Svalbard; one with co-infections of Salmonella Enteritidis PT1 and Yersinia pseudotuberculosis serotype 2b.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature5638
Source
Res Vet Sci. 2005 Apr;78(2):161-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2005
Author
K K Sørensen
T. Mørk
O G Sigurdardóttir
K. Asbakk
J. Akerstedt
B. Bergsjø
E. Fuglei
Author Affiliation
National Veterinary Institute, Regional laboratory, NO-9292 Tromsø, Norway. karen.soerensen@fagmed.uit.no
Source
Res Vet Sci. 2005 Apr;78(2):161-7
Date
Apr-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Agglutination Tests - veterinary
Animals
Antibodies, Protozoan - blood
Brain - parasitology - pathology
Female
Foxes - microbiology - parasitology
Immunohistochemistry - veterinary
Liver - parasitology - pathology
Lung - parasitology - pathology
Male
Norway
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Salmonella Infections, Animal - microbiology - parasitology
Salmonella enteritidis - isolation & purification
Toxoplasma - isolation & purification
Toxoplasmosis, Animal - microbiology - parasitology
Yersinia pseudotuberculosis - isolation & purification
Yersinia pseudotuberculosis Infections - microbiology - parasitology - veterinary
Abstract
Acute disseminated toxoplasmosis was diagnosed in three wild arctic foxes (Alopex lagopus) that were found dead in the same locality on Svalbard (Norway). The animals included one adult female and two 4-months-old pups. The adult fox was severely jaundiced. Necropsy revealed multifocal, acute, necrotizing hepatitis, acute interstitial pneumonia, and scattered foci of brain gliosis, often associated with Toxoplasma tachyzoites. One pup also had Toxoplasma-associated meningitis. In addition, the latter animal was infected with Yersinia pseudotuberculosis serotype 2b and Salmonella Enteritidis phage type 1 (PT1), which may have contributed to the severity of the Toxoplasma infection in this animal. The diagnosis of toxoplasmosis was confirmed by positive immunohistochemistry and detection of anti-Toxoplasma gondii antibodies in serum of all foxes. The animals were negative for Neospora caninum, canine distemper virus, canine adenovirus, and rabies virus on immunolabelling of tissue sections and smears.
PubMed ID
15563924 View in PubMed
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[A DISEASE CAUSED BY SALMONELLA PARATYPHI B.]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature75745
Source
Gig Sanit. 1964 Apr;29:84-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-1964

African pygmy hedgehog--associated Salmonella tilene in Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature206677
Source
Can Commun Dis Rep. 1997 Sep 1;23(17):129-31; discussion 131-2
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1-1997

[A hospital epidemic of Salmonella enteritidis with more than 170 cases].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature238802
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1985 May 6;147(19):1529-33
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-6-1985

Ammonia sanitization of blackwater for safe use as fertilizer.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature268278
Source
Water Sci Technol. 2015;71(5):795-800
Publication Type
Article
Date
2015
Author
Jörgen Fidjeland
Sven-Erik Svensson
Björn Vinnerås
Source
Water Sci Technol. 2015;71(5):795-800
Date
2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Ammonia - chemistry
Animals
Ascaris
Calcium Compounds - chemistry
Disinfection - methods
Enterococcus
Enterococcus faecalis
Escherichia coli
Escherichia coli O157
Fertilizers
Oxides - chemistry
Salmonella
Salmonella typhimurium
Sweden
Temperature
Urea - chemistry
Waste Water - chemistry - microbiology - parasitology
Abstract
Source-separated blackwater from low-flush toilets contains plant-available nutrients and can be used as a fertilizer. The aim of the study was to evaluate the impact on pathogen inactivation when treating blackwater with urea and/or lime. Blackwater was spiked with Salmonella typhimurium, Escherichia coli O157, Enterococcus faecalis, and Ascaris suum eggs, and treated with urea and/or lime in concentrations up to 0.1% w/w. The bottles were kept in a storage facility (manure slurry tank) for 102 days while monitoring the pathogen concentrations. The treatment time needed to meet the requirement for Salmonella and E. coli reduction could be reduced at least six-fold. The enterococci were more persistent, and only the highest treatment doses had a significantly higher inactivation than the controls. The Ascaris egg viability was only reduced by around 50%, so higher urea/lime doses and/or longer treatment times are required to fulfill the treatment requirements of 3 log10 reductions of parasite eggs.
PubMed ID
25768229 View in PubMed
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672 records – page 1 of 68.