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Antimycobacterial activity of lichen metabolites in vitro.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature69487
Source
Eur J Pharm Sci. 1998 Apr;6(2):141-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-1998
Author
K. Ingólfsdóttir
G A Chung
V G Skúlason
S R Gissurarson
M. Vilhelmsdóttir
Author Affiliation
Department of Pharmacy, University of Iceland, Hagi/Hofsvallagata, 107 Reykjavik, Iceland.
Source
Eur J Pharm Sci. 1998 Apr;6(2):141-4
Date
Apr-1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
4-Butyrolactone - analogs & derivatives - isolation & purification - pharmacology
Anti-Bacterial Agents - pharmacology
Benzofurans - isolation & purification - pharmacology
Comparative Study
Hydroxybenzoic Acids - isolation & purification - pharmacology
Lactones - isolation & purification - pharmacology
Lichens - metabolism
Microbial Sensitivity Tests
Mycobacterium - drug effects
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Salicylic Acids - isolation & purification - pharmacology
Abstract
Several compounds, whose structures represent the most common chemical classes of lichen metabolites, were screened for in vitro activity against Mycobacterium aurum, a non-pathogenic organism with a similar sensitivity profile to M. tuberculosis. Of the compounds tested, usnic acid from Cladonia arbuscula exhibited the highest activity with an MIC value of 32 microg/ml. Atranorin and lobaric acid, both isolated from Stereocaulon alpinum, salazinic acid from Parmelia saxatilis and protolichesterinic acid from Cetraria islandica all showed MIC values >/=125 microg/ml.
PubMed ID
9795033 View in PubMed
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Anti-proliferative effects of lichen-derived inhibitors of 5-lipoxygenase on malignant cell-lines and mitogen-stimulated lymphocytes.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature10919
Source
J Pharm Pharmacol. 1998 Jan;50(1):107-15
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-1998
Author
H M Ogmundsdóttir
G M Zoëga
S R Gissurarson
K. Ingólfsdóttir
Author Affiliation
Molecular and Cell Biology Research Laboratory, Icelandic Cancer Society, Reykjavík.
Source
J Pharm Pharmacol. 1998 Jan;50(1):107-15
Date
Jan-1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
4-Butyrolactone - analogs & derivatives - pharmacology
Comparative Study
Ethanol - pharmacology
Fibroblasts - drug effects
Humans
Lactones - pharmacology
Lichens
Lipoxygenase Inhibitors - pharmacology
Lymphocyte Activation - drug effects
Lymphocytes - drug effects
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Salicylic Acids - pharmacology
Tumor Cells, Cultured
Abstract
Several lichen species have been used traditionally as medicinal plants. It has previously been shown that two low-molecular-weight lichen metabolites, lobaric acid isolated from Stereocaulon alpinum Laur. and protolichesterinic acid isolated from Cetraria islandica L. (Ach.), have in-vitro inhibitory effects on arachidonate 5-lipoxygenase. We have studied the effects of these compounds on cultured cells from man, including three malignant cell-lines (T-47D and ZR-75-1 from breast carcinomas and K-562 from erythro-leukaemia), as well as normal skin fibroblasts and peripheral blood lymphocytes. Both test substances caused a significant reduction in DNA synthesis, as measured by thymidine uptake, in all three malignant cell-lines; the dose inducing 50% of maximum inhibition (ED50) was between 1.1 and 24.6 microg mL(-1) for protolichesterinic acid and between 14.5 and 44.7 microg mL(-1) for lobaric acid. The breast-cancer cell-lines were more sensitive than K-562. The proliferative response of mitogen-stimulated lymphocytes was inhibited with a mean ED50 of 8.4 microg mL(-1) and 24.5 microg mL(-1) for protolichesterinic acid and lobaric acid, respectively. These concentrations are of the same order of magnitude as the IC50 values in the 5-lipoxygenase assay. Significant cell death (assessed by the MTS (3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-5-(3-carboxymethoxyphenyl)-2-( 4-sulfophenyl)-2H-tetrazolium) assay and trypan blue exclusion) occurred in the three malignant cell-lines at protolichesterinic acid and lobaric acid concentrations above 20 and 30 microg mL(-1), respectively. In K-562 morphological changes consistent with apoptosis were detected. Up to 38% cell death was observed at 20 microg mL(-1) for protolichesterinic acid and 15 microg mL(-1) for lobaric acid in mitogen-stimulated lymphocytes but unstimulated lymphocytes were clearly less sensitive. In contrast, the DNA synthesis, proliferation and survival of normal skin fibroblasts were not affected at doses up to 20 microg mL(-1) for protolichesterinic acid and 30 microg mL(-1) for lobaric acid. We conclude that the anti-proliferative and cytotoxic effects observed might be related to the 5-lipoxygenase inhibitory activity of protolichesterinic acid and lobaric acid. These results open up the opportunity for future studies of these lichen metabolites with regard to their anti-tumour and anti-inflammatory properties.
PubMed ID
9504441 View in PubMed
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Comparison of the adsorptive properties of activated charcoal and Alaskan montmorillonite for some common poisons.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature13597
Source
Toxicol Appl Pharmacol. 1967 Jan;10(1):95-104
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-1967

[Denture hygiene I. Clinical evaluation of simple hygienic measures for institutionalized denture wearers. Studies at the Svartedal home for aged and sick in Gothenburg]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature75944
Source
Tandlakartidningen. 1975 Aug;67(15-16):864-71
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-1975

Effects of acetylsalicylic acid on man's skin temperature in the cold.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature298805
Source
Arctic Aeromedical Laboratory. Aerospace Medical Division, Alaska Force Systems Command. Fort Wainwright, Alaska. Technical documentary report TDR-63-14. 10 p.
Publication Type
Report
Date
June 1963
. , tables , 7 refs . Unclassified Repor t I II . Salicylic Acids Body Temperature Exposure P roject 8238 Task 82380 l Millard, W.W. , MSgt, USAF The purpose of this study was to dete r mine what I III. Avai lab le from O TS effect the usual dosage of acetylsalicylic acid IV. In ASTIA collection
  1 document  
Author
Millard, W.W.
Source
Arctic Aeromedical Laboratory. Aerospace Medical Division, Alaska Force Systems Command. Fort Wainwright, Alaska. Technical documentary report TDR-63-14. 10 p.
Date
June 1963
Language
English
Publication Type
Report
File Size
882494
Physical Holding
University of Alaska Anchorage
Keywords
Humans
Cold Temperature
Exposure
Salicylic acid
Body temperature
Abstract
The purpose of this study was to determine what effect the usual dosage of acetylsalicylic acid (aspirin) would have on the normal pattern of cold defense in man. Seven subjects participated in the experiment, with three exposures per subject conducted at 4° C. Subjects received ten grains of aspirin in one exposure and a ten-grain placebo in the second; the third exposure was a control with no capsule given. Results of these exposures are shown in graphs of skin and rectal temperatures. A discussion of the results is presented. The usual dosage of acetylsalicylic acid in itself appears to have no significant effect on the normal pattern of cold defense in man. There was a psychogenic reaction when a placebo or aspirin was administered.
Notes
UAA - ALASKA RC955.U9 no.63-14
Documents
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[Evaluation of anti-inflammatory activity of extracts from Siberian plants]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature98579
Source
Vestn Ross Akad Med Nauk. 2009;(11):30-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
2009
Author
Iu V Nesterova
T N Povet'eva
S G Aksinenko
N I Suslov
N N Gaidamovich
Iu G Nagorniak
E V Popova
S S Kravtsova
T I Andreeva
Source
Vestn Ross Akad Med Nauk. 2009;(11):30-4
Date
2009
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aconitum - chemistry
Alkaloids - analysis
Animals
Conium - chemistry
Delphinium - chemistry
Disease Models, Animal
Female
Fragaria - chemistry
Inflammation - drug therapy
Male
Mice
Phytotherapy - methods
Plant Extracts - chemistry - therapeutic use
Rats
Salicylic Acid - analysis
Salix - chemistry
Siberia
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
Experimental investigations have shown that water-alcohol extracts from plants containing alkaloids (Aconitum baikalense, Aconitum septentrionale, Delphinium elatum L., Conium maculatum) and salicylic acid (Filipendula ulmaria, Salix viminalis, Fragaria vesca, Rubus idaeus) inhibited the development of main symptoms of inflammation, viz. exudation, pain, fever, to the same extent as non-steroidal anti-inflammatory agents. The substances studied in this work may be used to develop new efficient pharmacological preparations for the treatment of different inflammatory conditions associated with severe pain syndrome.
PubMed ID
20017405 View in PubMed
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[On the problem of the study of resorption of salicylic acid and stabilization of some bases]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature8960
Source
Farm Zh. 1969;24(1):40-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
1969

[Study of solubility of oxy, amino- and nitrobenzoic acid isomers in water-ethanol mixtures]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature13581
Source
Farm Zh. 1968;23(1):11-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
1968
Author
V P Gusiakov
A I Shkadova
Source
Farm Zh. 1968;23(1):11-4
Date
1968
Language
Ukrainian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aminobenzoic Acids
Benzoates
Ethanol
Salicylic Acids
Solubility
PubMed ID
5699866 View in PubMed
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10 records – page 1 of 1.