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49 records – page 1 of 5.

AAA releases results of first anatomy salary/faculty survey.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature182749
Source
Anat Rec B New Anat. 2003 Dec;275(1):181
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2003

Antecedents and consequences of nurse managers' perceptions of organizational support.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature169937
Source
Nurs Econ. 2006 Jan-Feb;24(1):20-9, 3
Publication Type
Article
Author
Heather K Spence Laschinger
Nancy Purdy
Julia Cho
Joan Almost
Author Affiliation
Nursing Research, University of Western Ontario, School of Nursing, London, Ontario, Canada.
Source
Nurs Econ. 2006 Jan-Feb;24(1):20-9, 3
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Attitude of Health Personnel
Female
Health Care Surveys
Humans
Job Satisfaction
Male
Middle Aged
Models, organizational
Nurse Administrators - statistics & numerical data
Occupational Health - statistics & numerical data
Ontario
Organizational Culture
Professional Autonomy
Quality of Health Care - statistics & numerical data
Salaries and Fringe Benefits - statistics & numerical data
Self Efficacy
Social Perception
Abstract
The antecedents and consequences of nurse managers' perceptions of organizational support were evaluated. Study results revealed that changeable work environment factors are important precursors of perceptions of organizational support, which, in turn, result in positive work attitudes and better health.
PubMed ID
16583602 View in PubMed
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Assessing alcohol use and smoking among patients admitted to the medical ward.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature271999
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2015 Aug 11;135(14):1251-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-11-2015
Author
John-Kåre Vederhus
Ole Rysstad
Frode Gallefoss
Thomas Clausen
Øistein Kristensen
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2015 Aug 11;135(14):1251-5
Date
Aug-11-2015
Language
English
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alcohol drinking - epidemiology
Alcohol-Related Disorders - diagnosis
Educational Status
Female
Hospitalization - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Male
Medical History Taking - standards
Norway - epidemiology
Residence Characteristics - statistics & numerical data
Risk factors
Salaries and Fringe Benefits - statistics & numerical data
Smoking - epidemiology
Surveys and Questionnaires
Abstract
The objective of the study was to investigate the incidence of risky alcohol consumption in patients admitted to medical wards, and to examine possible differences in how smoking habits and alcohol consumption are assessed and monitored by health personnel.
The study was conducted on medical wards at Southern Norway Hospital Trust in autumn 2013. Out of 998 patients who were successively admitted, 536 were included in the analysis. A questionnaire was used to survey smoking and risky alcohol consumption, and to determine whether patients could remember being asked and advised about these during their hospitalisation period.
Fifty patients (9.3%) fulfilled the criteria for risky alcohol consumption. A lower percentage reported having been asked about their drinking habits than about their smoking habits (44% versus 62%, p
PubMed ID
26269066 View in PubMed
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Association of Chairmen of Departments of Physiology 1992 survey results.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature220986
Source
Physiologist. 1993 Jun;36(3):68-73
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1993

Attitude and flexibility are the most important work place factors for working parents' mental wellbeing, stress, and work engagement.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature112995
Source
Scand J Public Health. 2013 Nov;41(7):692-705
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2013
Author
Frida Eek
Anna Axmon
Author Affiliation
1Division of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
Source
Scand J Public Health. 2013 Nov;41(7):692-705
Date
Nov-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Attitude
Child
Child, Preschool
Conflict (Psychology)
Cross-Sectional Studies
Employment - organization & administration - psychology
Family - psychology
Female
Humans
Interprofessional Relations
Male
Mental health
Parents - psychology
Questionnaires
Salaries and Fringe Benefits - statistics & numerical data
Stress, Psychological - etiology - prevention & control
Sweden
Women, Working - psychology
Workplace - organization & administration - psychology
Abstract
The need to combine active employment and parenthood is a reality for many parents today. Knowing more about which work place factors are associated with better or worse health could help employers to form a work environment that provides optimal conditions to maintain or increase health and work engagement in this group. The aim of this study was to explore possible associations between different subjective and objective work factors and benefits, and a range of outcome variables such as stress, symptom report, wellbeing, work-related fatigue, work engagement, and work-family conflict among working mothers and fathers with small children.
Cross-sectional analyses of associations between work place factors categorised into three different dimensions; flexibility, benefits, and attitude and the outcome measures were performed, including questionnaire responses from 1562 working parents.
The results showed that work place factors related to flexibility and, especially among women, attitude to parenthood appear to have the strongest effect on working parents' subjective stress and wellbeing, while benefits appear to have less impact. Except regarding factors related to attitudes at the work place, most associations were similar among men and women.
Most likely, different factors are better suited or more important for some individuals than others depending on their total work, as well as family situation and also depending on individual factors such as personality and priorities. A positive attitude towards parenthood and a flexible work situation seem, however, beneficial for the general wellbeing and work engagement among working parents.
PubMed ID
23774665 View in PubMed
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Career patterns and job satisfaction of Canadian nurse educators.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature223345
Source
J Adv Nurs. 1992 Aug;17(8):1002-11
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-1992
Author
M C Barrett
D. Goldenberg
S. Faux
Author Affiliation
School of Nursing, Dalhousie University, Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada.
Source
J Adv Nurs. 1992 Aug;17(8):1002-11
Date
Aug-1992
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Career Mobility
Faculty, Nursing - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Job Satisfaction
Ontario
Peer Group
Personnel Turnover - statistics & numerical data
Questionnaires
Salaries and Fringe Benefits - statistics & numerical data
Social Support
Abstract
The purpose of this study was to describe the career patterns and job satisfaction of Ontario university and college nurse educators. A descriptive survey design was employed using mailed questionnaires. The sample comprised 60 nurse educators, 30 from three universities and 30 from three colleges. Forty-four returned the completed questionnaire, giving a response rate of 73%. The variables about the career patterns and goals of the nurse educators included their past and present job satisfaction. Career patterns were described as stable, double-track, interrupted and unstable. Similarities and differences were compared and described in relation to these factors. Significant differences in job satisfaction were found between university and college faculty on nine of the 36 job characteristics (for example, leadership style, independence, autonomy and salary). There were no significant differences in job satisfaction for each of the career patterns and the selected demographic variables of age, years in nursing education, educational level and salary between the university and college faculty.
PubMed ID
1506536 View in PubMed
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Careers in health care management, Part 1: Attainment, expectations and aspirations.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature215830
Source
Healthc Manage Forum. 1994;7(2):38-45
Publication Type
Article
Date
1994
Author
L. Lemieux-Charles
M. Murray
C. Aird
J. Barnsley
Author Affiliation
Department of Health Administration, University of Toronto.
Source
Healthc Manage Forum. 1994;7(2):38-45
Date
1994
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Career Mobility
Chief Executive Officers, Hospital - economics - statistics & numerical data
Family
Female
Hospital Administrators - economics - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Male
Professional Practice - statistics & numerical data
Questionnaires
Salaries and Fringe Benefits - statistics & numerical data
Sex Factors
Women, Working - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
The authors conducted a questionnaire survey of health care managers in Canada to learn more about their careers, work experiences and attitudes; and to determine whether their careers differed by such factors as sector of employment, gender, years of experience, education and family status. Major findings include: in teaching and community hospitals, men are more likely to fill chief executive officer (CEO) positions and women tend to be in middle management positions. More men than women in CEO positions reported incomes in the top range ($105,000). Men in CEO and senior management positions are more likely to be married and have children under 16 years of age living at home. Slightly more women than men were clinicians before becoming managers. Most respondents aspired to CEO or senior management positions. Implications for human resources practices are discussed.
PubMed ID
10134901 View in PubMed
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Chronic diseases as predictors of labour market attachment after participation in subsidised re-employment programme: a 6-year follow-up study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature292483
Source
J Epidemiol Community Health. 2017 Nov; 71(11):1101-1106
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Nov-2017
Author
Chioma A Nwaru
Laura Peutere
Mika Kivimäki
Jaana Pentti
Jussi Vahtera
Pekka J Virtanen
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Social Sciences, School of Health Sciences, University of Tampere, Tampere, Finland.
Source
J Epidemiol Community Health. 2017 Nov; 71(11):1101-1106
Date
Nov-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Adult
Chronic Disease - epidemiology - psychology
Employment - statistics & numerical data
Employment, Supported - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Female
Finland
Follow-Up Studies
Health status
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Salaries and Fringe Benefits - statistics & numerical data
Unemployment - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Work Capacity Evaluation
Young Adult
Abstract
Little is known about the work patterns of re-employed people. We investigated the labour market attachment trajectories of re-employed people and assessed the influence of chronic diseases on these trajectories.
The study was based on register data of 18?944 people (aged 18-60 years) who participated in a subsidised re-employment programme in Finland. Latent class growth analysis with zero-inflated Poisson was used to model the labour market attachment trajectories over a 6-year follow-up time. Multinomial logistic regression was used to examine the associations between chronic diseases and labour market attachment trajectories, adjusting for age, gender, educational level, size of town and calendar year in subsidised re-employment programme.
We identified four distinct labour market attachment trajectories, namely: strengthening (a relatively stable attachment throughout the follow-up time; 77%), delayed (initial weak attachment increasing later; 6%), leavers (attachment declined with time; 10%) and none-attached (weak attachment throughout the study period; 7%). We found that severe mental problems strongly increased the likelihood of belonging in the leavers (OR 3.61; 95%?CI 2.23 to 5.37) and none-attached (OR 3.41; 95%?CI 1.91 to 6.10) trajectories, while chronic hypertension was associated with none-attached (OR 1.37; 95%?CI 1.06 to 1.77) trajectory. The associations between other chronic diseases (diabetes, heart disease, asthma and arthritics) and labour market attachment trajectories were less evident.
Re-employed people appear to follow distinct labour market attachment trajectories over time. Having chronic diseases, especially mental disorders appear to increase the risk for relatively poor labour market attachment.
PubMed ID
28928224 View in PubMed
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49 records – page 1 of 5.