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2883 records – page 1 of 289.

3D simulation as a tool for improving the safety culture during remediation work at Andreeva Bay.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature265458
Source
J Radiol Prot. 2014 Dec;34(4):755-73
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2014
Author
K. Chizhov
M K Sneve
I. Szoke
I. Mazur
N K Mark
I. Kudrin
N. Shandala
A. Simakov
G M Smith
A. Krasnoschekov
A. Kosnikov
I. Kemsky
V. Kryuchkov
Source
J Radiol Prot. 2014 Dec;34(4):755-73
Date
Dec-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Decontamination - methods
Hazardous Waste Sites
Imaging, Three-Dimensional - methods
Models, organizational
Norway
Organizational Culture
Radiation Monitoring - methods
Radiation Protection - methods
Radioactive Waste - prevention & control
Russia
Safety Management - organization & administration
Abstract
Andreeva Bay in northwest Russia hosts one of the former coastal technical bases of the Northern Fleet. Currently, this base is designated as the Andreeva Bay branch of Northwest Center for Radioactive Waste Management (SevRAO) and is a site of temporary storage (STS) for spent nuclear fuel (SNF) and other radiological waste generated during the operation and decommissioning of nuclear submarines and ships. According to an integrated expert evaluation, this site is the most dangerous nuclear facility in northwest Russia. Environmental rehabilitation of the site is currently in progress and is supported by strong international collaboration. This paper describes how the optimization principle (ALARA) has been adopted during the planning of remediation work at the Andreeva Bay STS and how Russian-Norwegian collaboration greatly contributed to ensuring the development and maintenance of a high level safety culture during this process. More specifically, this paper describes how integration of a system, specifically designed for improving the radiological safety of workers during the remediation work at Andreeva Bay, was developed in Russia. It also outlines the 3D radiological simulation and virtual reality based systems developed in Norway that have greatly facilitated effective implementation of the ALARA principle, through supporting radiological characterisation, work planning and optimization, decision making, communication between teams and with the authorities and training of field operators.
PubMed ID
25254659 View in PubMed
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A 6-month, randomized, double-masked comparison of latanoprost with timolol in patients with open angle glaucoma or ocular hypertension.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature212248
Source
Acta Ophthalmol Scand. 1996 Apr;74(2):140-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-1996
Author
B. Friström
Author Affiliation
Department of Ophthalmology, University of Linköping, Sweden.
Source
Acta Ophthalmol Scand. 1996 Apr;74(2):140-4
Date
Apr-1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adrenergic beta-Antagonists - administration & dosage - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Double-Blind Method
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Glaucoma, Open-Angle - drug therapy - physiopathology
Humans
Intraocular Pressure - drug effects
Male
Middle Aged
Ocular Hypertension - drug therapy - physiopathology
Ophthalmic Solutions
Prostaglandins F, Synthetic - administration & dosage - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Safety
Scandinavia
Timolol - administration & dosage - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Abstract
The intraocular pressure reducing effect and side-effects of latanoprost, a phenyl-substituted prostaglandin analogue, were compared with those of timolol, in a group of 31 glaucomatous or ocular hypertensive patients, divided into three subgroups. The study was randomized and double masked. At the end of 6 month's treatment with latanoprost 0.005% once daily, either as a morning dose or as an evening dose, there was a reduction in intraocular pressure of 33% (p
PubMed ID
8739678 View in PubMed
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200 Hz flying-spot technology of the LaserSight LSX excimer laser in the treatment of myopic astigmatism: six and 12 month outcomes of laser in situ keratomileusis and photorefractive keratectomy.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature50810
Source
J Cataract Refract Surg. 2001 Aug;27(8):1263-77
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2001
Author
A. Stojanovic
T A Nitter
Author Affiliation
SynsLaser Clinic, Tromsø, Norway. aleks@online.no
Source
J Cataract Refract Surg. 2001 Aug;27(8):1263-77
Date
Aug-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Astigmatism - surgery
Comparative Study
Cornea - surgery
Female
Humans
Keratectomy, Photorefractive, Excimer Laser - methods
Keratomileusis, Laser In Situ - methods
Male
Middle Aged
Myopia - surgery
Refraction, Ocular
Retrospective Studies
Safety
Treatment Outcome
Visual acuity
Abstract
PURPOSE: To evaluate safety, efficacy, predictability, and stability in the treatment of myopic astigmatism with laser in situ keratomileusis (LASIK) and photorefractive keratectomy (PRK) using the 200 Hz flying-spot technology of the LaserSight LSX excimer laser. SETTING: SynsLaser Clinic, Tromsø, Norway. METHODS: This retrospective study included 110 eyes treated with LASIK and 87 eyes treated with PRK that were available for evaluation at 6 and 12 months, respectively. The mean preoperative spherical equivalent (SE) was -5.35 diopters (D) +/- 2.50 (SD) (range -1.13 to -11.88 D) in the LASIK eyes and -4.72 +/- 2.82 D (range -1.00 to -15.50 D) in the PRK eyes. The treated cylinder was 4.00 D in both groups. Eleven (8.5%) LASIK eyes and 8 (7.4%) PRK eyes had secondary surgical procedures before 6 and 12 months, respectively, and were excluded when the 6 and 12 month outcomes were analyzed. RESULTS: None of the eyes lost 2 or more lines of best spectacle-corrected visual acuity. Seventy-seven percent of the LASIK eyes and 78% of the PRK eyes achieved an uncorrected visual acuity of 20/20 or better; 98% in both groups achieved 20/40 or better. The SE was within +/-0.5 D of the desired refraction in 83% of the LASIK eyes and 77% of the PRK eyes; it was within +/-1.0 D in 97% and 98%, respectively. The cylinder correction had a mean magnitude of error of 0.04 +/- 0.31 D (range -0.96 to +0.85 D) in the LASIK eyes and 0.02 +/- 0.37 D (range -1.44 to +0.72 D) in the PRK eyes. Refractive stability was achieved at 1 month and beyond in the LASIK eyes and at 3 months and beyond in the PRK eyes. CONCLUSION: The outcomes of this study are comparable to those achieved with lasers that use small-beam technology with a lower frequency, as well as with other types of delivery systems. They suggest that the 200 Hz technology used in the LaserSight LSX excimer laser is safe, effective, and predictable and that with LASIK and PRK the results are stable when treating low to moderate myopia and astigmatism up to 4.0 D.
PubMed ID
11524200 View in PubMed
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1991-1996: Alaska's progress towards the goals of Healthy People 2000

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature88238
Source
Alaska's Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System 6(1)
Publication Type
Report
Date
Feb-1998
  1 website  
Author Affiliation
State of Alaska Department of Health and Social Services
Source
Alaska's Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System 6(1)
Date
Feb-1998
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Publication Type
Report
Physical Holding
University of Alaska Anchorage
Keywords
Behavioral risk factors
Cholesterol screening
Cigarette smoking
Diabetes
Fruit and vegetable consumption
Heart disease
Inflluenza amd pneumonia immunizations
Mammography and clinical breast exams
Overweight
Pap tests
Physical activity
Proctoscopic exams
Safety belt use
Abstract
The Alaska Department of Health and Social Services implemented the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS) in 1990 in cooperation with the federal Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The system gathers information about the health-related lifestyle choices of Alaskan adults related to leading causes of death such as heart disease, cancer and injury. The program is part of an ongoing national data collection system. Results are analyzed each year to improve our understanding of Alaskan health habits and to measure progress toward national and state health objectives. This report summarizes survey findings from 1991 to 1996 and compares the results to selected national health objectives presented in the Healthy People 2000 publication.
Online Resources
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1995 behavioral risk factor survey highlights

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature88230
Source
Alaska's Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System 5(1)
Publication Type
Report
Date
April-1997
  1 website  
Author Affiliation
State of Alaska Department of Health and Social Services
Source
Alaska's Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System 5(1)
Date
April-1997
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Publication Type
Report
Physical Holding
University of Alaska Anchorage
Keywords
Adult immunizations
Alcohol use
Behavioral risk factors
Breast cancer screening
Cervical cancer screening
Cholesterol screening
Chronic Disease
Colorectal cancer screening
Diabetes
Health care coverage
HIV/AIDS
Hypertension
Overweight
Premature death
Safety belt use
Tobacco use
Abstract
Behavior and lifestyle play an important part in determining our health status and lifespan. Every day Alaskans make lifestyle choices that profoundly affect their health. Although heredity and environment play a part, the leading causes of death in Alaska (heart disease, cancer and unintentional injuries) are closely related to lifestyle factors. Lifestyle and behavioral factors that affect health include such things as diet, exercise, use of alcohol and tobacco, and preventive health practices. Many premature deaths and disabilities could be prevented through better control of these behavioral risk factors.
Online Resources
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[2001: year 1 for the patient safety in Danish hospitals?].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature193055
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 2001 Jan 1;163(1):9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-1-2001

Abolishment of 24-hour continuous medical call duty in quebec: a quality of life survey of general surgical residents following implementation of the new work-hour restrictions.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature114387
Source
J Surg Educ. 2013 May-Jun;70(3):296-303
Publication Type
Article
Author
Fadi T Hamadani
Dan Deckelbaum
Alexandre Sauve
Kosar Khwaja
Tarek Razek
Paola Fata
Author Affiliation
McGill University Health Centre, Division of Trauma Surgery, Montreal, Quebec, Canada.
Source
J Surg Educ. 2013 May-Jun;70(3):296-303
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Education, Medical, Graduate - standards
Female
General Surgery - education
Humans
Internship and Residency
Male
Patient Safety
Quality of Life
Quebec
Questionnaires
Work Schedule Tolerance
Workload - standards - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
The implementation of work hour restrictions across North America have resulted in decreased levels of self injury and medical errors for Residents. An arbitration ruling in Quebec has led to further curtailment of work hours beyond that proposed by the ACGME. This may threaten Resident quality of life and in turn decrease the educational quality of surgical residency training.
We administered a quality of life questionnaire with an integrated education quality assessment tool to all General Surgery residents training at McGill 6 months after the work hour restrictions.
Across several strata respondents reveal a decreased sense of educational quality and quality of life.
The arbitration argued that work- hour restrictions would be necessary to improve quality of life for trainees and hence improve patient safety. Results from this study demonstrate the exact opposite in a large majority of respondents, who report a poorer quality of life and a self-reported inability on their part to provide continuous and safe patient care.
PubMed ID
23618437 View in PubMed
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[About flavouring substances and flavouring preparations regulation in the field of manufacturing of flavourings and foodstuffs].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature112655
Source
Vopr Pitan. 2013;82(1):23-32
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
Author
O V Bagriantseva
G N Shatrov
Source
Vopr Pitan. 2013;82(1):23-32
Date
2013
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Flavoring Agents - pharmacology - standards
Food Industry - legislation & jurisprudence - standards
Food Safety
Humans
Russia
Abstract
In article are given substantiation for modification of contemporary list of biologically active substances with undesirable toxicological qualities (namely included in this list of menthofuran, methyleugenol (4-Allyl-1,2-dimethoxybenzene), teucrin A, capsaicin, estragol1 (-Allyl-4-methoxybenzene) and excluded from the list of quinine, santonin, berberin) and developing the list of plants--natural sources of flavourings substances. The new criteria of European Union for including into the relevant for using in/on foodstuff list of flavouring substances, which was published in the Comission Implementing Regulation (EU) No 872/2012 concerning flavourings, listed the 11 flavouring substances for which have been established indexes of foodstuffs in manufacturing, which there are could using and criteria of their safety (caffeine, theobromine, neohesperidin dihydrocalcone, rebaudioside A, d-camphor, three quinine salts (FL 14.011, FL 14.152 and FL 14.155), glycyrrhizic acid and its ammoniated form, ammonium chloride, discussed the possibility of using R- and S-isomers of flavouring substances and L- and D-forms of aminoacids for preparing of flavours, are discussed. Improving of the system of safety using of flavourings in Russian Federation, harmonized with demands of European Union and FAQ/WHO, are, at first, connected with the necessity of reevaluation of the list flavouring substances, which could be use in/on foodstuff, developing of list of the plants--natural sources of flavourings substances and preparations and regulations of using flavourings preparations which can include biologically active substances.
PubMed ID
23808275 View in PubMed
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2883 records – page 1 of 289.