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180 records – page 1 of 18.

Adaptation of a Russian population to SARS-CoV-2: Asymptomatic course, comorbidities, mortality, and other respiratory viruses - A reply to Fear versus Data.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature305323
Source
Int J Antimicrob Agents. 2020 Oct; 56(4):106093
Publication Type
Journal Article
Multicenter Study
Date
Oct-2020
Author
Konstantin S Sharov
Author Affiliation
Koltzov Institute of Developmental Biology, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow, Russia. Electronic address: const.sharov@mail.ru.
Source
Int J Antimicrob Agents. 2020 Oct; 56(4):106093
Date
Oct-2020
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Multicenter Study
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Asymptomatic Diseases
Betacoronavirus - pathogenicity
COVID-19
Cardiovascular Diseases - diagnosis - epidemiology - mortality
Child
Child, Preschool
Comorbidity
Coronary Disease - diagnosis - epidemiology - mortality
Coronavirus Infections - diagnosis - epidemiology - mortality - transmission
Diabetes Mellitus - diagnosis - epidemiology - mortality
Fear - psychology
Female
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Male
Middle Aged
Obesity - diagnosis - epidemiology - mortality
Pandemics
Pneumonia, Viral - diagnosis - epidemiology - mortality - transmission
Respiratory Tract Infections - diagnosis - epidemiology - mortality - transmission
Retrospective Studies
Russia - epidemiology
SARS-CoV-2
Severity of Illness Index
Survival Analysis
Abstract
This study was conducted to assess the spread of SARS-CoV-2 in Russia and the adaptation of the population to the virus in March to June 2020. Two groups were investigated: 1) 12 082 individuals already proven positive for SARS-CoV-2 (clinical information was studied); 2) 7864+4458 individuals with suspected respiratory infections (polymerase chain reaction [PCR] tests and clinical information were studied). In the latter, SARS-CoV-2-positive individuals comprised 5.37% in March and 11.42% in June 2020. Several viral co-infections were observed for SARS-CoV-2. Rhinoviruses accounted for the largest proportion of co-infections (7.91% of samples were SARS-CoV-2-positive); followed by respiratory syncytial virus (7.03%); adenoviruses (4.84%); metapneumoviruses (3.29%); parainfluenza viruses (2.42%); enterovirus D68 (1.10%) and other viruses (entero-, echo-, parecho-) (
PubMed ID
32653618 View in PubMed
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[A decrease in male reproductive potential in Russia: causes, diagnosis, possibilities for correction].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature304857
Source
Urologiia. 2020 Sep; (4):157-164
Publication Type
Journal Article
Review
Date
Sep-2020
Author
V V Borisov
Author Affiliation
FGAOU VO I.M. Sechenov First Moscow State Medical University. Moscow, Russia.
Source
Urologiia. 2020 Sep; (4):157-164
Date
Sep-2020
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Journal Article
Review
Keywords
Antioxidants
Betacoronavirus
COVID-19
Coronavirus Infections - complications
Humans
Infertility, Male - physiopathology - virology
Male
Oxidative Stress
Pandemics
Pneumonia, Viral - complications
Reproduction
Russia
SARS-CoV-2
Selenium
Trace Elements
Zinc
Abstract
The causes, some pathogenetic mechanisms and possibilities for correcting the decrease in male reproductive potential in Russia are discussed in the lecture. Particular attention is paid to oxidative stress as one of the main causes for subfertility and male infertility, as well as the role of trace elements (zinc, selenium) and antioxidants (vitamins A, E and C) in the pathogenesis of male infertility and opportunities for the correction of fertility issues. Some aspects of COVID-19 influence on the problems of reproductive medicine, andrology and urology are highlighted.
PubMed ID
32897031 View in PubMed
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Adolescents' health literacy, health protective measures, and health-related quality of life during the Covid-19 pandemic.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature304892
Source
PLoS One. 2020; 15(8):e0238161
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
2020
Author
Kirsti Riiser
Sølvi Helseth
Kristin Haraldstad
Astrid Torbjørnsen
Kåre Rønn Richardsen
Author Affiliation
Department of Physiotherapy, Faculty of Health, OsloMet-Oslo Metropolitan University, Oslo, Norway.
Source
PLoS One. 2020; 15(8):e0238161
Date
2020
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Betacoronavirus
COVID-19
Coronavirus Infections - epidemiology
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Hand Disinfection
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Health Literacy
Humans
Male
Norway
Pandemics
Pneumonia, Viral - epidemiology
Quality of Life
SARS-CoV-2
Social Isolation
Surveys and Questionnaires
Television
Young Adult
Abstract
First, to describe adolescents' health information sources and knowledge, health literacy (HL), health protective measures, and health-related quality of life (HRQoL) during the initial phase of the Covid-19 pandemic in Norway. Second, to investigate the association between HL and the knowledge and behavior relevant for preventing spread of the virus. Third, to explore variables associated with HRQoL in a pandemic environment.
This cross-sectional study includes survey data from 2,205 Norwegian adolescents 16-19 years of age. The participants reported on their health information sources, HL, handwashing knowledge and behavior, number of social interactions, and HRQoL. Associations between study variables and specified outcomes were explored using multiple linear and logistic regression analyses.
Television (TV) and family were indicated to be the main sources for pandemic-related health information. Handwashing, physical distancing, and limiting the number of social contacts were the most frequently reported measures. HL and handwashing knowledge and HL and handwashing behavior were significantly associated. For each unit increase on the HL scale, the participants were 5% more likely to socialize less with friends in comparison to normal. The mean HRQoL was very poor compared to European norms. Being quarantined or isolated and having confirmed or suspected Covid-19 were significantly negatively associated with HRQoL, but seeing less friends than normal was not associated. HL was significantly positively associated with HRQoL, albeit of minor clinical importance.
Adolescents follow the health authorities' guidelines and appear highly literate. However, high fidelity requires great sacrifice because the required measures seem to collide with certain aspects that are important for the adolescents' HRQoL.
PubMed ID
32857806 View in PubMed
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[Almost two-thirds of the elderly with covid-19 surviving in nursing homes].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature305471
Source
Lakartidningen. 2020 06 26; 117:
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
06-26-2020
Author
Stefan Amér
Christian Molnar
Marina Tuutma
Carina Metzner
Petra Tegman
Maria Taranger
Miia Kivipelto
Peter Strang
Author Affiliation
Ordförande i SÄBO-rådet Stockholm, Familjeläkarna Äldrevård.
Source
Lakartidningen. 2020 06 26; 117:
Date
06-26-2020
Language
Swedish
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Aged
Betacoronavirus
COVID-19
Coronavirus Infections - mortality
Frail Elderly
Humans
Nursing Homes
Pandemics
Pneumonia, Viral - mortality
SARS-CoV-2
Survival Analysis
Sweden - epidemiology
Abstract
A large proportion of deaths worldwide have occurred among elderly living in nursing homes. Sweden is no exception with a comparable proportion making up around half of all deaths. The elderly, frail individuals living in nursing homes are among the most vulnerable and with the highest risk to die of covid-19. In spite of that we see almost two-thirds of the infected are still alive with a majority recovering fully after receiving treatment at the nursing home. Of 8?057 residents living in nursing homes in Stockholm, 1?464 (18?%) individuals have so far been diagnosed  with covid-19 and 532 have died (6?% of all residents). Importantly, this means that a great majority of the residents are still alive including almost two-thirds (932/1?464) of the infected individuals.
PubMed ID
32594470 View in PubMed
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American Indian and Alaska Native People: Social Vulnerability and COVID-19.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature305158
Source
J Rural Health. 2021 01; 37(1):256-259
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
01-2021

Analysis of Risk Factors in COVID-19 Adult Mortality in Russia.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature312163
Source
J Prim Care Community Health. 2021 Jan-Dec; 12:21501327211008050
Publication Type
Journal Article
Author
Youri Kirillov
Sergei Timofeev
Ashot Avdalyan
Vladimir N Nikolenko
Leonid Gridin
Mikhail Y Sinelnikov
Author Affiliation
Research Institute of Human Morphology, Moscow, Russia.
Source
J Prim Care Community Health. 2021 Jan-Dec; 12:21501327211008050
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Autopsy
COVID-19 - blood - epidemiology - mortality
Cohort Studies
Comorbidity
Diabetes Mellitus - epidemiology
Electronic Health Records
Female
Humans
Hypertension - epidemiology
Male
Middle Aged
Neoplasms - epidemiology
Obesity - epidemiology
Retrospective Studies
Russia - epidemiology
SARS-CoV-2
Sex Factors
Abstract
Epidemiological data obtained during the ongoing SARS-CoV-2 pandemic suggests that COVID-19 mortality has specific age and gender associations. However, limited epidemiological studies explored specific populational risk factors, including comorbidities, and patient clinical characteristics. The main aim of our retrospective cohort study was to analyze associations between age, gender, and comorbidities in deceased COVID-19 patients.
A retrospective cohort analysis was performed to assess significant risk factors in adult patients deceased from COVID-19 infection by evaluating Electronic Medical Records and post-mortem analysis in COVID-19 patients deceased between April 2020 to October 2020. All patients underwent post-mortem evaluation along with medical history analysis, including data on disease duration, hospitalization, and clinical peculiarities.
Medical records of 1487 COVID-19 patients revealed that the prevalence of males was higher (by 23%) than females; the median age for males was 71?years of age whereas for females it was 78. The most prevalent comorbid pathologies were: hypertension, obesity, diabetes, and cancer. Males are at significantly increased risk of lethal outcome, even in younger age groups, with comorbid conditions.
The study concluded that comorbidities, such as hypertension, obesity, diabetes, cancer are the most important risk factors for comorbid mortality in COVID-19 patients. In addition to lung damage, multiple organ dysfunctions may be a crucial reason for COVID-19 induced death. Special precautions, such as early hospitalization, increased monitoring, and preventative tactics should be taken for at-risk patients.
PubMed ID
33829916 View in PubMed
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The association of mode of location activity and mobility with acute coronary syndrome: a nationwide ecological study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature303969
Source
J Intern Med. 2021 02; 289(2):247-254
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
02-2021
Author
M A Mohammad
S Koul
C P Gale
J Alfredsson
S James
O Fröbert
E Omerovic
D Erlinge
Author Affiliation
From the, Department of Cardiology, Clinical Sciences, Lund University, Skåne University Hospital, Lund, Sweden.
Source
J Intern Med. 2021 02; 289(2):247-254
Date
02-2021
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Acute Coronary Syndrome - epidemiology - prevention & control
Angioplasty, Balloon, Coronary
COVID-19 - epidemiology - prevention & control
Cell Phone
Coronary Angiography
Cross-Sectional Studies
Exercise
Health Policy
Humans
Pandemics
Registries
Regression Analysis
Risk factors
SARS-CoV-2
Social Control Policies
Social Environment
Sweden
Abstract
We aimed to study the effect of social containment mandates on ACS presentation during COVID-19 pandemic using location activity and mobility data from mobile phone map services.
We conducted a cross-sectional study using data from the Swedish Coronary Angiography and Angioplasty Registry (SCAAR) including all ACS presentations during the pandemic until 7 May 2020. Using a count regression model, we adjusted for day of the week, daily weather and incidence of COVID-19.
A 10% increase in activity around areas of residence was associated with 38% lower rates of ACS hospitalizations, whereas increased activity relating to retail and recreation, grocery stores and pharmacies, workplaces and mode of mobility was associated with 10-20% higher rates of ACS hospitalizations.
Government policy regarding social containment mandates has important public health implications for medical emergencies such as ACS and may explain the decline in ACS presentations observed during COVID-19 pandemic.
PubMed ID
33259680 View in PubMed
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Blood type A associated with critical COVID-19 and death in a Swedish cohort-a critical comment.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature304841
Source
Crit Care. 2020 09 04; 24(1):547
Publication Type
Letter
Date
09-04-2020
Author
Joern Bullerdiek
Author Affiliation
Institute of Medical Genetics, Medical Center, University of Rostock, D-18057, Rostock, Germany. joern.bullerdiek@med.uni-rostock.de.
Source
Crit Care. 2020 09 04; 24(1):547
Date
09-04-2020
Language
English
Publication Type
Letter
Keywords
Betacoronavirus
COVID-19
Coronavirus Infections
Humans
Pandemics
Pneumonia, Viral
SARS-CoV-2
Sweden
PubMed ID
32887647 View in PubMed
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Brief Online Cognitive Behavioural Intervention for Dysfunctional Worry Related to the COVID-19 Pandemic: A Randomised Controlled Trial.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature312204
Source
Psychother Psychosom. 2021; 90(3):191-199
Publication Type
Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial
Date
2021
Author
Tove Wahlund
David Mataix-Cols
Klara Olofsdotter Lauri
Elles de Schipper
Brjánn Ljótsson
Kristina Aspvall
Erik Andersson
Author Affiliation
Division of Psychology, Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden, tove.wahlund@ki.se.
Source
Psychother Psychosom. 2021; 90(3):191-199
Date
2021
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Anxiety - therapy
COVID-19 - psychology
Cognitive Behavioral Therapy - methods
Female
Humans
Internet-Based Intervention
Male
Middle Aged
Patient Health Questionnaire
SARS-CoV-2
Sweden - epidemiology
Treatment Outcome
Young Adult
Abstract
Worries about the immediate and long-term consequences of the COVID-19 pandemic may for some individuals develop into pervasive worry that is disproportionate in its intensity or duration and significantly interferes with everyday life.
The aim of this study was to investigate if a brief self-guided, online psychological intervention can reduce the degree of dysfunctional worry related to the COVID-19 pandemic and associated symptoms.
670 adults from the Swedish general population reporting daily uncontrollable worry about CO-VID-19 and its possible consequences (e.g., illness, death, the economy, one's family) were randomised (1:1 ratio) to a 3-week self-guided, online cognitive behavioural intervention targeting dysfunctional COVID-19 worry and associated symptoms, or a waiting list of equal duration. The primary outcome measure was a COVID-19 adapted version of the Generalised Anxiety Disorder 7-item scale administered at baseline and weeks 1-3 (primary endpoint). Follow-up assessments were conducted 1 month after treatment completion. The trial was registered on ClinicalTrials.gov (NCT04341922) before inclusion of the first participant.
The main pre-specified intention-to-treat analysis indicated significant reductions in COVID-19-related worry for the intervention group compared to the waiting list (ß = 1.14, Z = 9.27, p
Notes
CommentIn: Psychother Psychosom. 2021;90(3):156-159 PMID 33517335
PubMed ID
33212440 View in PubMed
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Burden and prevalence of prognostic factors for severe COVID-19 in Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature305893
Source
Eur J Epidemiol. 2020 May; 35(5):401-409
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
May-2020
Author
Katalin Gémes
Mats Talbäck
Karin Modig
Anders Ahlbom
Anita Berglund
Maria Feychting
Anthony A Matthews
Author Affiliation
Unit of Epidemiology, Institute of Environmental Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
Source
Eur J Epidemiol. 2020 May; 35(5):401-409
Date
May-2020
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Asthma - epidemiology
Betacoronavirus
COVID-19
Cardiovascular Diseases - epidemiology
Child
Child, Preschool
Coronavirus
Coronavirus Infections - epidemiology
Cost of Illness
Critical Care
Diabetes Mellitus - epidemiology
Humans
Infant
Middle Aged
Neoplasms - epidemiology
Pandemics
Pneumonia, Viral - epidemiology
Population Surveillance - methods
Prevalence
Prognosis
Pulmonary Disease, Chronic Obstructive - epidemiology
SARS-CoV-2
Severity of Illness Index
Sweden - epidemiology
Young Adult
Abstract
The World Health Organization and European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control suggest that individuals over the age of 70 years or with underlying cardiovascular disease, cancer, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, asthma, or diabetes are at increased risk of severe COVID-19. However, the prevalence of these prognostic factors is unknown in many countries. We aimed to describe the burden and prevalence of prognostic factors of severe COVID-19 at national and county level in Sweden. We calculated the burden and prevalence of prognostic factors for severe COVID-19 based on records from the Swedish national health care and population registers for 3 years before 1st January 2016. 9,624,428 individuals were included in the study population. 22.1% had at least one prognostic factor for severe COVID-19 (2,131,319 individuals), and 1.6% had at least three factors (154,746 individuals). The prevalence of underlying medical conditions ranged from 0.8% with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (78,516 individuals) to 7.4% with cardiovascular disease (708,090 individuals), and the county specific prevalence of at least one prognostic factor ranged from 19.2% in Stockholm (416,988 individuals) to 25.9% in Kalmar (60,005 individuals). We show that one in five individuals in Sweden is at increased risk of severe COVID-19. When compared with the critical care capacity at a local and national level, these results can aid authorities in optimally planning healthcare resources during the current pandemic. Findings can also be applied to underlying assumptions of disease burden in modelling efforts to support COVID-19 planning.
PubMed ID
32424571 View in PubMed
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180 records – page 1 of 18.