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6-Locus HLA allele and haplotype frequencies in a population of 1075 Russians from Karelia.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature301335
Source
Hum Immunol. 2019 Feb; 80(2):95-96
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Feb-2019
Author
Yvonne Hagenlocher
Beatrix Willburger
Geoffrey A Behrens
Alexander H Schmidt
Yuri Ioffe
Jürgen Sauter
Author Affiliation
DKMS German Bone Marrow Donor Center, Tübingen, Germany.
Source
Hum Immunol. 2019 Feb; 80(2):95-96
Date
Feb-2019
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Alleles
Gene Frequency
Genetic Loci
Genetics, Population
Genotype
HLA Antigens - genetics
Haplotypes
Humans
Population Groups
Russia - ethnology
Abstract
A total of 1075 Russians from the Russian part of Karelia were genotyped at high-resolution for the human leukocyte antigen loci HLA-A, -B, -C, -DRB1, -DQB1, and -DPB1 using next generation sequencing methods. The haplotypic and allelic profiles as well as Hardy-Weinberg proportions of this population sample were evaluated. As the most frequent 6-locus haplotype, A*03:01?g?~?B*07:02?g?~?C*07:02?g?~?DRB1*15:01?g?~?DQB1*06:02?g?~?DPB1*04:01?g was identified with an estimated frequency of 3.5%. No deviation from Hardy-Weinberg Equilibrium was detected at any of the loci studied. The HLA genotypic data of the population sample reported here are available publicly in the Allele Frequencies Net Database under the population name "Russia Karelia" and the identifier AFN3430.
PubMed ID
30391501 View in PubMed
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[ABO blood groups as a risk factor in ischemic heart disease and arterial hypertension in various ethnic populations].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature241327
Source
Ter Arkh. 1984;56(1):72-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
1984

Acculturation or development? Autonomy expectations among ethnic German immigrant adolescents and their native German age-mates.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature120815
Source
Child Dev. 2012 Sep-Oct;83(5):1640-54
Publication Type
Article
Author
Peter F Titzmann
Rainer K Silbereisen
Author Affiliation
Department of Developmental Psychology, Friedrich-Schiller-University Jena, Am Steiger 3 / 1, 07743 Jena, Germany. peter.titzmann@uni-jena.de
Source
Child Dev. 2012 Sep-Oct;83(5):1640-54
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acculturation
Adolescent
Attitude
Child
Culture
Emigrants and Immigrants - psychology
Germany
Humans
Longitudinal Studies
Personal Autonomy
Russia - ethnology
Abstract
This longitudinal study compared immigrant and native adolescents' expectations concerning the timing of conventional socially acceptable and oppositional less socially acceptable forms of autonomy. Based on normative development and a collectivist background among immigrants, both developmental and acculturative change was expected. The sample consisted of 523 ethnic German immigrants from the former Soviet Union and 475 native German adolescents, both groups divided into an early (age 12.5years) and a late (age 16years) adolescent group. Results revealed more developmental than acculturative change, as immigrants and natives mostly showed a similar rate of change in autonomy expectations. Acculturative change was found only for oppositional autonomy among late adolescent immigrants, whose later expectations approached those of their native age-mates over time.
PubMed ID
22966928 View in PubMed
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[Age-related dynamics of aortic atherosclerosis of various ethnic groups of the male population of Andizhan].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature224854
Source
Arkh Patol. 1992;54(7):25-30
Publication Type
Article
Date
1992
Author
A M Vikhert
V S Zhdanov
A S Churikova
I E Galakhov
I P Drobkova
S N Zukhritdinova
N I Vasil'eva
G I Burlutskii
Source
Arkh Patol. 1992;54(7):25-30
Date
1992
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Aortic Diseases - ethnology - pathology
Arteriosclerosis - ethnology - pathology
Humans
Incidence
Male
Middle Aged
Russia - ethnology
Abstract
Quantitative study of the aortic atherosclerosis was performed in 587 males of the indigenous (IP) and in 149 males of non-indigenous population (NIP) at the age of 20 to 59 years in the city of Andizhan according to the WHO program. The course of atherosclerosis was more severe in NIP persons although at the age of up to 40 years the differences in the mean surface of atherosclerotic changes were lacking. The surface of lipid spots was similar in both groups or was somewhat lower in NIP, but these spots in NIP persons were thicker and contained more foam cells and more areas of diffuse lipid deposition. The rate of the surface increase of prominent lesions drastically increased in the 5th decade of life in both groups. The frequency of rhythmical structures in the aorta was the same in both groups; their incidence was higher in cases of pronounced atherosclerosis.
PubMed ID
1471936 View in PubMed
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Alcohol abuse in Russian delinquent adolescents. Associations with comorbid psychopathology, personality and parenting.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature174165
Source
Eur Child Adolesc Psychiatry. 2005 Aug;14(5):254-61
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2005
Author
Roman A Koposov
Vladislav V Ruchkin
Martin Eisemann
Pavel I Sidorov
Author Affiliation
Institute of Psychology and Psychiatry, Northern State Medical University, Arkhangelsk, Russia. rkoposov@arh.ru
Source
Eur Child Adolesc Psychiatry. 2005 Aug;14(5):254-61
Date
Aug-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adolescent Behavior
Adult
Alcoholism - ethnology - etiology - psychology
Comorbidity
Exploratory Behavior
Female
Humans
Juvenile Delinquency
Male
Mental Disorders - complications
Parenting
Personality
Risk factors
Russia - ethnology
Abstract
Adolescent delinquency and alcohol abuse have become a growing concern in Russia. Psychopathology, a dysfunctional family and specific personality factors have all been linked to addictive and antisocial behavior. Since delinquent youth represent a specific risk group, where alcohol misuse tends to be more pronounced than in the general population, the objectives of this study were: 1) to compare differences in personality and parenting factors, and in psychopathology in juvenile delinquents with and without alcohol abuse; and 2) to evaluate the associations between alcohol abuse, personality and parenting factors, after controlling for comorbid psychopathology.
Psychopathology, including alcohol abuse, was assessed by means of a psychiatric interview in 229 Russian incarcerated male juvenile delinquents. In addition, alcohol use, personality, and parenting factors were assessed by self-reports.
Alcohol-abusing delinquents (n=138) scored significantly higher on novelty seeking and maternal emotional warmth and reported higher levels of psychopathology, as compared to nonalcohol-abusing delinquents (n=91). Logistic regression analysis demonstrated that personality and parenting factors were significantly related to alcohol abuse, even after controlling for comorbid psychopathology.
Alcohol-abusing delinquents are at risk for a wide spectrum of psychiatric disorders. Alcohol abuse is associated with personality and parenting factors independently of comorbid psychopathology. Early interventions with high-risk youths may help to reduce their psychiatric problems and alcohol abuse.
PubMed ID
15981137 View in PubMed
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Alcohol consumption and mortality in Russia since 2000: are there any changes following the alcohol policy changes starting in 2006?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature117414
Source
Alcohol Alcohol. 2013 Mar-Apr;48(2):222-30
Publication Type
Article
Author
Maria Neufeld
Jürgen Rehm
Author Affiliation
Centre for Addiction and Mental Health, Toronto, ON, Canada.
Source
Alcohol Alcohol. 2013 Mar-Apr;48(2):222-30
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alcohol Drinking - legislation & jurisprudence - mortality - trends
Cause of Death - trends
Humans
Public Policy - legislation & jurisprudence - trends
Russia - ethnology
Abstract
To elucidate the possible effects of Russian alcohol control policy on alcohol consumption and alcohol-related mortality for the period 2000-2010.
Narrative review including statistical analysis. Trends before and after 2006 are compared, 2006 being the date of implementation of the Russian government's long-term strategy to reduce alcohol-related harms. Mortality data were taken from the World Health Organization (WHO) database 'Health for All'. Data on recorded alcohol consumption were taken from the WHO, based on the Russian Statistical Service (Rosstat). For unrecorded consumption, the calculations of Alexandr Nemtsov were used. Russian public opinion surveys on drinking habits were utilized. Treatment data on alcohol dependence were obtained from the Moscow National Research Centre on Addictions. Information on alcohol policy was obtained from official reports.
Marked fluctuations in all-cause and alcohol-associated mortality in the working-age population were observed during the reviewed period. A decrease in total consumption and mortality was noted since the end of 2005, when the Russian government initially adopted the regulation of alcohol production and sale. The consumption changes were driven by decreases in recorded and unrecorded spirit consumption, only partly compensated for by increases in beer and wine consumption.
Alcohol is a strong contributor to premature deaths in Russia, with both the volume and the pattern of consumption being detrimental to health. The regulations introduced since 2006 seem to have positive effects on both drinking behavior and health outcomes. However, there is an urgent need for further alcohol-control strategies to reduce alcohol-related harm.
PubMed ID
23299570 View in PubMed
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Alcohol consumption in the Baltic Republics.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature198583
Source
J Epidemiol Community Health. 2000 May;54(5):361-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2000
Author
M. McKee
J. Pomerleau
A. Robertson
I. Pudule
D. Grinberga
K. Kadziauskiene
A. Abaravicius
S. Vaask
Author Affiliation
European Centre on Health of Societies in Transition, London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, London WC1E 7HT.
Source
J Epidemiol Community Health. 2000 May;54(5):361-6
Date
May-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Alcohol drinking - epidemiology
Beer
Cross-Sectional Studies
Estonia - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Latvia - epidemiology
Lithuania - epidemiology
Male
Middle Aged
Russia - ethnology
Social Class
Socioeconomic Factors
Wine
Abstract
Premature mortality associated with alcohol intake is of particular concern in several countries of the former Soviet Union. This study explored self reported alcohol consumption (beer, wine, spirits) and its determinants in the Baltic Republics.
Cross sectional surveys conducted in 1997.
Estonia, Latvia and Lithuania.
Representative samples of adults age 19-64 (Estonia n=2010; Latvia n=2258; Lithuania n=2139).
Between country differences in the frequency of alcohol intake were estimated. The odds of consuming alcohol weekly according to socioeconomic characteristics (age, ethnicity, rural/urban area, education, income) were calculated using multiple logistic regression analyses, adjusting for all variables simultaneously.
The proportion of respondents consuming alcohol weekly varied by country (p
Notes
Cites: Addiction. 1999 Jun;94(6):857-6610665075
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Cites: J Stud Alcohol. 1993 May;54(3):334-448487543
Cites: Alcohol Clin Exp Res. 1994 Feb;18(1):88-968198232
Cites: J Epidemiol Community Health. 1999 May;53(5):277-8210396533
Cites: Lancet. 1997 Aug 9;350(9075):383-89259651
Cites: BMJ. 1998 Aug 1;317(7154):312-89685275
Cites: J R Soc Med. 1998 Aug;91(8):402-79816353
Cites: BMJ. 1995 Jun 24;310(6995):1668-97795463
PubMed ID
10814657 View in PubMed
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Amanita phalloides intoxications in a family of russian immigrants. Case reports and review of the literature with a focus on orthotopic liver transplantation.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature217842
Source
Z Gastroenterol. 1994 Jul;32(7):399-404
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-1994
Author
C. Scheurlen
N. Spannbrucker
U. Spengler
R. Zachoval
H. Schulte-Witte
K A Brensing
T. Sauerbruch
Author Affiliation
Department of Internal Medicine, University of Bonn, Germany.
Source
Z Gastroenterol. 1994 Jul;32(7):399-404
Date
Jul-1994
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Amanita
Amanitins - poisoning
Child, Preschool
Critical Care
Emigration and Immigration
Female
Germany
Hepatic Encephalopathy - diagnosis - etiology - surgery
Humans
Liver Function Tests
Liver Transplantation
Male
Mushroom Poisoning - complications - diagnosis - surgery
Russia - ethnology
Abstract
Alpha-amanitin, the main toxin of the death cap fungus (Amanita phalloides) is one of the most dangerous natural poison. This toxin damages eukaryotic cells by inhibiting their transcription. Lesions are seen in cells with rapid protein synthesis, particular in liver and renal cells, even at low toxin concentrations. Without adequate intensive therapy, the outcome of alpha-amanitin poisoning is very poor. This article reports various courses of amanitin intoxication in a family. In 3/4 patients, severe hepatic failure developed as assessed by a decrease of all coagulation factors, mainly Quick's test and factor V (
PubMed ID
7975777 View in PubMed
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An examination of cancer risk beliefs among adults from Toronto's Somali, Chinese, Russian and Spanish-speaking communities.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature190520
Source
Can J Public Health. 2002 Mar-Apr;93(2):138-41
Publication Type
Article
Author
Judy A Paisley
Jess Haines
Marlene Greenberg
Mary-Jo Makarchuk
Sarah Vogelzang
Krystyna Lewicki
Author Affiliation
School of Nutrition, Ryerson University, 350 Victoria Street, Toronto, ON M5B 2K3. j2paisle@ryerson.ca
Source
Can J Public Health. 2002 Mar-Apr;93(2):138-41
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Attitude to Health - ethnology
China - ethnology
Culture
Disease Susceptibility - ethnology
Female
Food Supply - standards
Health education
Hispanic Americans
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Neoplasms - etiology - psychology
Ontario
Risk factors
Russia - ethnology
Somalia - ethnology
Spain - ethnology
Abstract
Canada's growing ethnocultural diversity challenges health professionals to develop culturally sensitive cancer prevention strategies. Little is known about the ethnocultural specificity of cancer risk beliefs. This qualitative pilot study examined cancer risk beliefs, focusing on diet, among adults from Toronto's Somali, Chinese, Russian, and Spanish-speaking communities.
Group interviews (n = 4) were conducted with convenience samples of adults (total n = 45) from four ethnocultural communities (total 45 participants).
The constant comparison method of data analysis identified three common themes: knowledge of cancer risk factors, concern about the food supply, and the roles of spiritual and emotional well-being. Two areas of contrasting belief concerning specific mediators of cancer risk were identified.
Findings support the investigation of cultural-specific health promotion strategies emphasizing both the maintenance of traditional cancer protective eating practices and the adoption of additional healthy eating practices among new Canadians. More research is needed to enhance our understanding of ethnoculturally specific cancer risk beliefs and practices to ensure the cultural relevance of programming.
PubMed ID
11963519 View in PubMed
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Arranging and negotiating the use of informal interpreters in general practice consultations: experiences of refugees and asylum seekers in the west of Ireland.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature150233
Source
Soc Sci Med. 2009 Jul;69(2):210-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2009
Author
Anne MacFarlane
Zhanna Dzebisova
Dmitri Karapish
Bosiljka Kovacevic
Florence Ogbebor
Ekaterina Okonkwo
Author Affiliation
National University of Ireland, Galway, Ireland. anne.macfarlane@nuigalway.ie
Source
Soc Sci Med. 2009 Jul;69(2):210-4
Date
Jul-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Communication Barriers
Family Practice
Female
Health Services Accessibility
Humans
Interviews as Topic
Ireland
Male
Multilingualism
Physician-Patient Relations
Refugees
Russia - ethnology
Serbia - ethnology
Social Support
Abstract
This paper focuses on the work involved for service users in arranging and negotiating the use of informal interpreters from their social networks for general practice consultations. The data are drawn from a participatory learning and action research study, carried out in the west of Ireland. Qualitative data were gathered using a peer researcher model from a 'hard to reach' community of Serbo-Croat and Russian refugees and asylum seekers (n=26). The findings elucidate that there is a tension for service users between the experienced benefits of having a trusted friend/family member present to act as their interpreter and the burden of work and responsibility to manage the language barrier. Participants emphasize that, for them, the use of informal interpreters can be inadequate and problematic and can leave them worried, frustrated and with experiences of error and misdiagnosis. Overall, they state a clear preference for the use of professional, trained interpreters in general practice consultations which is currently unavailable to them in routine Irish general practice consultations.
PubMed ID
19535192 View in PubMed
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254 records – page 1 of 26.