Skip header and navigation

Refine By

5 records – page 1 of 1.

[Alcoholism at the end of 1980-s and beginning of 2010-s].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature294852
Source
Zh Nevrol Psikhiatr Im S S Korsakova. 2016; 116(6):60-65
Publication Type
Historical Article
Journal Article
Author
Nemtsov A V
Orlov A V
Author Affiliation
Moscow Research Institute of Psychiatry Branch of Serbsky Federal Medical Research Center of Psychiatry and Narcology, Moscow, Russia.
Source
Zh Nevrol Psikhiatr Im S S Korsakova. 2016; 116(6):60-65
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Historical Article
Journal Article
Keywords
Alcohol Drinking - epidemiology - history
Alcohol Withdrawal Delirium - epidemiology
Alcoholic Beverages - analysis - classification - history - utilization
Alcoholism - diagnosis - epidemiology - history
History, 20th Century
History, 21st Century
Humans
Russia - epidemiology
Abstract
To study the 20-years' clinical alteration and alcoholism basing on the changes in its clinical symptoms and course.
The study included 527 alcoholics with formed alcohol withdrawal syndrome: 181 alcoholics were examined in 1988-1990 (Group 1) and 346 alcoholics in 2011-2012 (Group 2).
In Group 1, vodka consumption dominated at all stages of alcoholism. Group 2 included 172 alcoholics with the domination of vodka consumption and 174 alcoholics with mixed consumption. It was shown that in comparison with Group 1 (1988-1990 patients) patients from Group 2 (2011-2012) had slower and mild development of alcoholism, especially those in the mixed consumption group. The authors suggest that the change of the clinical pattern in Group 2 was due to the change in the composition of consumed alcoholic beverages.
???? ?????????????. ??????? ????????? ??????? ? ??????? ??????????? ?? 20 ???. ???????? ? ??????. ??????????? 527 ??????? ???????????? ?? ?????????????? ??????????? ???????????? ?????????, ?? ??????? 181 ??????? ?????????? ? 1988-1990 ??. ? 346 ??????? - ? 2011-2012 ??. ?????????? ? ??????????. ? ??????, ????????????? ? ????? 1980-?, ???????????? ????? ?? ???? ?????? ???????? ???????????. ? ??????, ????????????? ? ?????? 2010-?, ? ????? ??????? ????? ???????????? ???????????? ????? (172 ????????), ? ?????? ????? (174 ???????) ???? ????????? ???????????. ????????, ??? ? ????????? ? ???????? 20-?????? ???????? ? ???????, ????????????? ? 2011-2012 ??., ?????????? ??????????? ????????? ? ????????? ?????, ???????? ? ?????? ?? ????????? ????????????. ??????? ?????????????, ??? ????????? ??????????? ??????? ? ??????? ?????? 2010-? ????? ??????????? ?????????? ??????? ???????????? ??????????? ????????.
PubMed ID
27456905 View in PubMed
Less detail

Caries, antemortem tooth loss and tooth wear observed in indigenous peoples and Russian settlers of 16th to 19th century West Siberia.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature301133
Source
Arch Oral Biol. 2019 Feb; 98:176-181
Publication Type
Historical Article
Journal Article
Date
Feb-2019
Author
Hyejin Lee
Jong Ha Hong
Yeonwoo Hong
Dong Hoon Shin
Sergey Slepchenko
Author Affiliation
Lab of Bioanthropology, Paleopathology and History of Diseases, Department of Anatomy and Cell Biology, Institute of Forensic Science, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul, 03080, South Korea; Ministry of National Defense Agency of KIA Recovery & Identification, Seoul, 06984, South Korea.
Source
Arch Oral Biol. 2019 Feb; 98:176-181
Date
Feb-2019
Language
English
Publication Type
Historical Article
Journal Article
Keywords
Agriculture
Dental Caries - epidemiology - history
Diet
Female
Geographic Mapping
History, 16th Century
History, 17th Century
History, 18th Century
History, 19th Century
Humans
Male
Paleodontology
Prevalence
Russia - epidemiology
Siberia - epidemiology
Skeleton
Tooth Loss - epidemiology - history
Tooth Wear - epidemiology
Abstract
Increased prevalence of dental caries evidently is correlated with increasing intake of sugar and carbohydrate-rich foods. Preceding and accompanying this dietary alteration might have been a shift from a hunting-and-gathering subsistence strategy to one based on agriculture. We corroborated this conjecture by means of a study on the prevalence of caries, antemortem tooth loss (AMTL) and tooth wear among 16th to 19th century hunter-gatherers and agriculturalists who co-existed in West Siberia.
Indigenous skeletons (n?=?75) exhumed from Tatar, Selkup, Khant, and Nenet graves along with Russian settler skeletons (n?=?79) from Izyuk were examined. The prevalence of caries, AMTL and tooth wear among the indigenous peoples were compared with those among the Russian settlers. The resulting statistical inferences were tested using package R.
The agriculturalist Russian settlers showed a significantly higher prevalence of dental caries (11.88%) than did the non-agriculturalist indigenous Siberian people (3.85%). Among the latter, the prevalence was the lowest in the Khanty and the highest in the Tatars, suggesting that caries differently affected each sub-group of indigenous Siberian people. Correspondingly to the case of dental caries, the Russian settlers' AMTL prevalence also was higher than that of the indigenous Siberians, regardless of age. On the other hand, the native Siberians and the Russian settlers did not show statistical differences in tooth wear.
In the study on 16th to 19th century West Siberian populations, we were able to corroborate our presumption that agriculturalists ingesting a carbohydrate-rich diet would have higher rates of dental caries and AMTL than would hunter-gatherers.
PubMed ID
30500667 View in PubMed
Less detail

Novel Reassortant Clade 2.3.4.4 Avian Influenza A(H5N8) Virus in Wild Aquatic Birds, Russia, 2016.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature290106
Source
Emerg Infect Dis. 2017 02; 23(2):359-360
Publication Type
Historical Article
Journal Article
Date
02-2017
Author
Dong-Hun Lee
Kirill Sharshov
David E Swayne
Olga Kurskaya
Ivan Sobolev
Marsel Kabilov
Alexander Alekseev
Victor Irza
Alexander Shestopalov
Source
Emerg Infect Dis. 2017 02; 23(2):359-360
Date
02-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Historical Article
Journal Article
Keywords
Animals
Animals, Wild
Birds - virology
Disease Outbreaks
Genes, Viral
History, 21st Century
Influenza A Virus, H5N8 Subtype - classification - genetics
Influenza in Birds - epidemiology - history - virology
Phylogeny
Public Health Surveillance
Reassortant Viruses
Russia - epidemiology
Abstract
The emergence of novel avian influenza viruses in migratory birds is of concern because of the potential for virus dissemination during fall migration. We report the identification of novel highly pathogenic avian influenza viruses of subtype H5N8, clade 2.3.4.4, and their reassortment with other avian influenza viruses in waterfowl and shorebirds of Siberia.
Notes
Cites: PLoS One. 2012;7(9):e46183 PMID 23049973
Cites: Emerg Infect Dis. 2016 Jun;22(6):1121-3 PMID 27192098
Cites: Science. 2006 Apr 21;312(5772):384-8 PMID 16627734
Cites: Emerg Infect Dis. 2010 Feb;16(2):349-51 PMID 20113582
Cites: J Virol. 2015 Jun;89(12):6521-4 PMID 25855748
Cites: Emerg Infect Dis. 2014 Aug;20(8):1315-8 PMID 25075453
Cites: Emerg Infect Dis. 2014 Jun;20(6):1087-9 PMID 24856098
Cites: Vet Microbiol. 2014 Oct 10;173(3-4):249-57 PMID 25192767
Cites: Arch Virol. 2015 Nov;160(11):2857-60 PMID 26306756
PubMed ID
27875109 View in PubMed
Less detail

[The Morbidity of Infectious Diseases in the USSR. Report I. 1919-1949].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature297822
Source
Probl Sotsialnoi Gig Zdravookhranenniiai Istor Med. 2018 Sep; 26(5):350-356
Publication Type
Historical Article
Journal Article
Date
Sep-2018
Author
S N Zatravkin
R U Habriev
V O Shchepin
A S Sarkisov
Author Affiliation
The Federal State Budget Scientific Institution "N. A. Semashko National Research Institute of Public Health", 105064, Moscow, Russia, zatravkine@mail.ru.
Source
Probl Sotsialnoi Gig Zdravookhranenniiai Istor Med. 2018 Sep; 26(5):350-356
Date
Sep-2018
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Historical Article
Journal Article
Keywords
Communicable Diseases - epidemiology
History, 20th Century
Humans
Morbidity
Russia - epidemiology
USSR - epidemiology
Abstract
The article presents the analysis of elicited and systematized indices of morbidity of acutely contagious diseases in the Empire of Russia and the USSR in 1887-1949. The firmly established in scientific literature opinion about stable epidemic well-being set in the USSR in 1930-1940s is disproved. It is established that in the USSR during this period occurred increasing of morbidity of infectious diseases. The main causes of this occurrence are demonstrated.
PubMed ID
30566819 View in PubMed
Less detail

Will It Come Here? Using Digital Humanities Tools to Explore Medical Understanding during the Russian Flu Epidemic, 1889-90.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature297763
Source
Med Hist. 2017 07; 61(3):474-477
Publication Type
Historical Article
Journal Article
Review
Date
07-2017