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6345 records – page 1 of 635.

[2 outbreaks of trichinelliasis in Rostov Province].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature220244
Source
Med Parazitol (Mosk). 1993 Oct-Dec;(5):18-21
Publication Type
Article
Author
V A Dotsenko
T I Tverdokhlebov
A A Shirinian
N G Barinova
A P Ordyntseva
S A Nagornyi
A V Markin
S Ia Verkholomova
E P Tikhomirova
Source
Med Parazitol (Mosk). 1993 Oct-Dec;(5):18-21
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Child
Child, Preschool
Disease Outbreaks - statistics & numerical data
Female
Humans
Infant
Male
Mebendazole - therapeutic use
Middle Aged
Russia - epidemiology
Time Factors
Trichinellosis - diagnosis - drug therapy - epidemiology
Abstract
Two epidemiologically unrelated outbreaks of trichinellosis were registered in Rostov Province in the November and December of 1984 with 16 patients in the Salsk District and 20 patients in Rostov-on-Don. The course of the disease was characterized by 6-20% of severe and 31-45% moderate forms, respectively. The source of the infection was pork that had not been controlled for Trichinella spiralis. Late diagnosis and inadequate treatment in one case led to a fatal outcome. Economic losses accounted for 490,000 rubles (as of 1985). In spite of energetic prophylaxis measures, the situation in the Rostov Province continues to be serious. In 1989-1992, eighteen cases of trichinellosis were registered in the Salsk District again.
PubMed ID
8127264 View in PubMed
Less detail

5. Nonmalignant diseases after the Chernobyl catastrophe.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature146767
Source
Ann N Y Acad Sci. 2009 Nov;1181:58-160
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2009
Author
Alexey V Yablokov
Author Affiliation
Russian Academy of Sciences, Leninsky Prospect 33, Office 319, 119071 Moscow, Russia. Yablokov@ecopolicy.ru
Source
Ann N Y Acad Sci. 2009 Nov;1181:58-160
Date
Nov-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Chernobyl Nuclear Accident
Humans
Radiation Injuries - epidemiology - genetics - immunology - metabolism
Republic of Belarus - epidemiology
Russia - epidemiology
Ukraine - epidemiology
Abstract
This section describes the spectrum and the scale of the nonmalignant diseases that have been found among exposed populations. Adverse effects as a result of Chernobyl irradiation have been found in every group that has been studied. Brain damage has been found in individuals directly exposed--liquidators and those living in the contaminated territories, as well as in their offspring. Premature cataracts; tooth and mouth abnormalities; and blood, lymphatic, heart, lung, gastrointestinal, urologic, bone, and skin diseases afflict and impair people, young and old alike. Endocrine dysfunction, particularly thyroid disease, is far more common than might be expected, with some 1,000 cases of thyroid dysfunction for every case of thyroid cancer, a marked increase after the catastrophe. There are genetic damage and birth defects especially in children of liquidators and in children born in areas with high levels of radioisotope contamination. Immunological abnormalities and increases in viral, bacterial, and parasitic diseases are rife among individuals in the heavily contaminated areas. For more than 20 years, overall morbidity has remained high in those exposed to the irradiation released by Chernobyl. One cannot give credence to the explanation that these numbers are due solely to socioeconomic factors. The negative health consequences of the catastrophe are amply documented in this chapter and concern millions of people.
PubMed ID
20002045 View in PubMed
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[10 years of testing of the HER2 status in breast cancer in Russia].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature116989
Source
Arkh Patol. 2012 Sep-Oct;74(5):3-6
Publication Type
Article

[15 years after the accident at the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature19138
Source
Radiats Biol Radioecol. 2002 Mar-Apr;42(2):228-33
Publication Type
Article
Author
L A Buldakov
A K Gus'kova
Author Affiliation
State Research Centre-Institute of Biophysics, Russian Ministry of Health, Moscow, 123182 Russia.
Source
Radiats Biol Radioecol. 2002 Mar-Apr;42(2):228-33
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidents, Radiation
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Byelarus - epidemiology
Child
Child, Preschool
Comparative Study
English Abstract
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Male
Neoplasms, Radiation-Induced - epidemiology - etiology
Power Plants
Pregnancy
Prognosis
Radiation Dosage
Radiation Injuries - epidemiology
Risk factors
Russia - epidemiology
Thyroid Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology
Time Factors
Ukraine - epidemiology
Abstract
Health effects as a result of the accident at the Chernobyl nuclear power plant occurred in 1986 are considered in the paper. Wrong prognosis of the health effects with respect to mortality and morbidity among the population exposed to low radiation doses is shown. Proven increase in thyroid cancer cases among people who were children aged from 0 to 18 at the time of the accident is shown. Linear relationship between thyroid cancer cases and dose to thyroid ranged from 0.2 to 4.0 Gy is considered. An additional absolute risk of thyroid cancer in children varies in the range 1.9-2.6 cases per 10(4) person-year Gy. During the fifteen years following the accident no cases of acute and chronic radiation sickness have been revealed because the population living in contaminated areas received low radiation doses. Also, exposures to low radiation doses did not result in excess of malignant tumors among population. In some cases the outcomes of acute radiation sickness were as follows: radiation damages to the skin, cancer cataracts, development of oncopathology.
PubMed ID
12004624 View in PubMed
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[20-year experience with modified dose fractionation of radiotherapy in primary Hodgkin's disease].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature154608
Source
Vopr Onkol. 2008;54(4):529-31
Publication Type
Article
Date
2008
Author
N V Il'in
E N Nikolaeva
E V Smirnova
Iu N Vinogradova
E I Ivanova
B M Izotov
I A Shenderova
Source
Vopr Onkol. 2008;54(4):529-31
Date
2008
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Biomedical research
Disease-Free Survival
Dose Fractionation
Female
Hodgkin Disease - radiotherapy
Humans
Incidence
Kaplan-Meier Estimate
Leukopenia - epidemiology - etiology
Male
Middle Aged
Pericarditis - epidemiology - etiology
Pneumonia - epidemiology - etiology
Radiotherapy - adverse effects
Recurrence
Retrospective Studies
Russia - epidemiology
Severity of Illness Index
Thrombocytopenia - epidemiology - etiology
Treatment Outcome
Abstract
Significantly lower frequency of relapse, incidence of pulmonitis and pericarditis, leukopenia and thrombocytopenia stage IV and longer recurrence-free survival were reported after acceleration of multifractionation of STD of 1.35Gy was used for treatment of patients with primary Hodgkin's disease, as compared with standard fractionation. When STD was reduced to 1.2Gy (modified multifractionation), subtotal exposure of lymph nodes was followed by a significant drop in frequency and severity of leukopenia and thrombocytopenia stage III-IV. The latter complications, rates decreased further, with perspective response to therapy, as irradiation was limited to that of areas exposed during modified multifractionation.
PubMed ID
18942416 View in PubMed
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[25-year experience of Sverdlovsk regional occupational center on the basis of the research institute].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature198488
Source
Med Tr Prom Ekol. 2000;(3):30-3
Publication Type
Article
Date
2000
Author
S G Domnin
E P Zhovtiak
A G Gol'del'man
Source
Med Tr Prom Ekol. 2000;(3):30-3
Date
2000
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Catchment Area (Health)
Humans
Occupational Diseases - epidemiology - prevention & control
Occupational Health Services - supply & distribution - trends
Russia - epidemiology
Time Factors
Abstract
Sverdlovsk Regional Occupational Center based on the Research Institute has highly qualified staff, incorporates ambulatory department, hospital with modern diagnostic and therapeutic equipment. The Center performs multiple tasks, being an organizational and methodic, diagnostic and occupational examination institution using up-to-date advances in industrial medicine.
PubMed ID
10826371 View in PubMed
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A 30-year study of homicide recidivism and schizophrenia.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature108246
Source
Crim Behav Ment Health. 2013 Dec;23(5):347-55
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2013
Author
Andrei Golenkov
Matthew Large
Olav Nielssen
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychiatry and Medical Psychology, Chuvash State University, Cheboksary, Russia.
Source
Crim Behav Ment Health. 2013 Dec;23(5):347-55
Date
Dec-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Criminals - psychology
Female
Homicide - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Incidence
Logistic Models
Male
Middle Aged
Recurrence
Residence Characteristics
Retrospective Studies
Russia - epidemiology
Schizophrenia - diagnosis - epidemiology
Schizophrenic Psychology
Socioeconomic Factors
Time Factors
Violence - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Young Adult
Abstract
A second homicide by a released mentally ill person is a potentially avoidable tragedy that can reduce the prospects of conditional release for other mentally ill offenders.
The aim of this study was to compare the clinical and criminological features of single and recidivist homicide offenders with schizophrenia from the Chuvash Republic of the Russian Federation.
Data were extracted from the criminal and clinical records of all people with schizophrenia who had been convicted of a homicide in the Chuvash Republic at any time between 1 January 1981 and 31 December 2010. Those convicted of a second homicide offence during the 30 years of the study were compared with those convicted of a single homicide.
Sixteen (10.7%) of 149 homicide offenders with schizophrenia had committed a previous homicide. The 16 recidivists included nine offenders who were diagnosed with schizophrenia at the time of their first homicide (after January 1981), three who were diagnosed with schizophrenia only after the first homicide and four who had already been diagnosed with schizophrenia at the time of a pre-1981 homicide. Time at risk for recidivists and non-recidivists differed, but the average time back in the community for the non-recidivists just exceeded the average time to second homicide for the recidivists. All the recidivists were men. Living in a rural area and dissocial personality traits were associated with homicide recidivism.
In the Chuvash republic, most of the repeat homicide offences by people with schizophrenia were committed by people residing in rural areas with less access to psychiatric services, which provides indirect evidence for the efficacy of ongoing treatment and supervision in preventing repeat homicides. This area of study is, however, limited by the small numbers of cases and the long follow-up required. International collaborative studies are indicated to provide a more accurate estimate of the rate of recidivist homicide in schizophrenia.
PubMed ID
23913742 View in PubMed
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The -112G>A polymorphism of the secretoglobin 3A2 (SCGB3A2) gene encoding uteroglobin-related protein 1 (UGRP1) increases risk for the development of Graves' disease in subsets of patients with elevated levels of immunoglobulin E.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature138513
Source
J Appl Genet. 2011 May;52(2):201-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2011
Author
Dimitry A Chistiakov
Natalia V Voronova
Rust I Turakulov
Kirill V Savost'anov
Author Affiliation
Department of Molecular Diagnostics, National Research Center GosNIIgenetika, 1st Dorozhny Proezd 1, 117545, Moscow, Russia. dimitry.chistiakov@lycos.com
Source
J Appl Genet. 2011 May;52(2):201-7
Date
May-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Asthma - genetics
Case-Control Studies
Female
Genetic Association Studies
Genetic markers
Genetic Predisposition to Disease
Genotype
Graves Disease - epidemiology - genetics
Humans
Hypersensitivity - genetics
Immunoglobulin E - blood
Male
Odds Ratio
Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide
Promoter Regions, Genetic
Russia - epidemiology
Secretoglobins
Sequence Analysis, DNA
Uteroglobin - blood - genetics
Young Adult
Abstract
The human secretoglobin 3A2 (SCGB3A2) gene encoding secretory uteroglobin-related protein 1 (UGRP1) resides on the chromosome region 5q31-33 that harbors a susceptibility locus to several autoimmune and inflammatory diseases, including asthma and Graves' disease (GD). Recently, association between the marker rs1368408 (-112G?>A), located in the promoter region of the SCGB3A2 gene, and susceptibility to GD was found in Chinese and UK Caucasians. The study aim was to evaluate whether this polymorphism confers GD susceptibility in a large population cohort comprising 1,474 Russian GD patients and 1,619 controls. The marker rs1368408 was studied using a TaqMan allele discrimination assay. Serum levels of UGRP1 and immunoglobulin E (IgE) were assessed using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) analyses. Association between the allele A of SCGB3A2 and a higher risk of GD (odds ratio [OR] = 1.33, P = 2.9 × 10(-5)) was shown. Both affected and non-affected carriers of the higher risk genotype A/A had significantly decreased levels of serum UGRP1 compared to the subjects homozygous for G/G (93 ± 37 pg/ml vs. 132 ± 45 pg/ml, P = 0.0011 for GD patients; 77 ± 28 pg/ml vs. 119 ± 33 pg/ml, P = 0.0019 for controls). Serum IgE levels were significantly higher in non-affected subjects homozygous for A/A compared to control individuals homozygous for G/G (153 ± 46 IU/ml vs. 122 ± 40 IU/ml, P = 0.0095). Our data suggest that the carriage of the SCGB3A2 -112A/A variant increases the risk for GD in subsets of patients with elevated levels of IgE, a hallmark of allergic asthma. Therefore, the SCGB3A2 -112G?>A polymorphism may be considered as a likely marker linking susceptibility to allergy/asthma and GD on chromosome 5q31-33.
PubMed ID
21170691 View in PubMed
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[About investigations of socioeconomic consequences of neurotrauma].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature145509
Source
Zh Vopr Neirokhir Im N N Burdenko. 2009 Oct-Dec;(4):61-4
Publication Type
Article

6345 records – page 1 of 635.