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537 records – page 1 of 54.

Academic screencasting: internet-based dissemination of ophthalmology grand rounds.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature137424
Source
Can J Ophthalmol. 2011 Feb;46(1):72-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2011
Author
Roshan Razik
Zaid Mammo
Harmeet S Gill
Wai-Ching Lam
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Medicine, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ont, Canada.
Source
Can J Ophthalmol. 2011 Feb;46(1):72-6
Date
Feb-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Academic Medical Centers
Cross-Sectional Studies
Data Collection
Education, Medical, Continuing - methods
Humans
Information Dissemination - methods
Internet
Internship and Residency
Ontario
Ophthalmology - education
Rural Population - statistics & numerical data
Teaching - methods
Teaching Rounds - methods
Urban Population - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
To evaluate and compare the preferences and attitudes of Ontario ophthalmologists and ophthalmology residents toward screencasting as an educational tool with potential use for continuing medical education (CME) events.
Cross-sectional study.
Eighty of 256 participants completed the survey.
The surveys were sent to participants by email, with follow-up via telephone. Study participants were urban and rural Ontario ophthalmologists, registered with the Canadian Ophthalmological Society, and University of Toronto ophthalmology residents. Pre-recorded online presentations-screencasts-were used as the main intervention. Online surveys were used to measure multiple variables evaluating the attitudes of the participants toward screencasting. This data was then used for further quantitative and qualitative analysis.
Over 95% of participants replied favourably to the introduction and future utilization of screencasting for educational purposes. Rural ophthalmologists were the most enthusiastic about future events. Practising in rural Ontario was associated with a higher interest in live broadcasts than practising in urban centres (p
PubMed ID
21283162 View in PubMed
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[A case of human infection with brucellosis from a cat]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature36213
Source
Zh Mikrobiol Epidemiol Immunobiol. 1993 Jul-Aug;(4):66-8
Publication Type
Article
Author
L P Repina
A I Nikulina
I A Kosilov
Source
Zh Mikrobiol Epidemiol Immunobiol. 1993 Jul-Aug;(4):66-8
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Animals
Brucella - isolation & purification - pathogenicity
Brucellosis - epidemiology - microbiology - transmission - veterinary
Cat Diseases - epidemiology - microbiology - transmission
Cats
Child
Child, Preschool
Disease Vectors
English Abstract
Female
Guinea Pigs
Humans
Male
Mice
Rural Population - statistics & numerical data
Siberia - epidemiology
Virulence
Abstract
The epidemiological study of a focus of Brucella infection revealed that an outbreak of brucellosis occurred in a small town, and the source of this infection was a domestic cat. As the result of contacts with this cat, six persons, among them three children aged 3, 8 and 12 years, had brucellosis. In all these patients acute brucellosis was diagnosed. Simultaneously with the clinical manifestations of the disease, a rise in antibody titer from 1:50 to 1:1,600 was observed. Brucella cultures isolated from the blood of one of the patients and from the internal organs of the cat exhibited the properties, similar to those of "rodent" strains, i. e. their differential signs permit their classification with B. suis, serovar 5.
PubMed ID
8067119 View in PubMed
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Access to internet in rural and remote Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature264077
Source
Stud Health Technol Inform. 2014;201:407-12
Publication Type
Article
Date
2014
Author
Leanne M Currie
Charlene Ronquillo
Tania Dick
Source
Stud Health Technol Inform. 2014;201:407-12
Date
2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Distribution
Canada - ethnology
Computer Literacy - statistics & numerical data
Consumer Health Information - utilization
Health Services Accessibility - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Internet - utilization
Inuits - statistics & numerical data
Rural Population - statistics & numerical data
Sex Distribution
Abstract
Canada is the second largest landmass country in the world, but has one of the lowest population densities. As of 2011, approximately 19% of the Canadian population lives in rural, or remote communities. The purpose of this study was to examine differences in rural and urban access to the Internet and device use in Canada, and to explore differences in access to broadband between Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal communities in Canada. In general rural-dwellers had lower levels of Internet access and despite efforts to increase access to high speed Internet, Aboriginal communities in some regions have limited access. Future research should explore computer and health literacy in the context of rural and remote communities in Canada.
PubMed ID
24943574 View in PubMed
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Source
J Trauma. 2010 Dec;69(6):1350-61; discussion 1361
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2010
Author
Syed Morad Hameed
Nadine Schuurman
Tarek Razek
Darrell Boone
Rardi Van Heest
Tracey Taulu
Nasira Lakha
David C Evans
D Ross Brown
Andrew W Kirkpatrick
Henry T Stelfox
Dianne Dyer
Mary van Wijngaarden-Stephens
Sarvesh Logsetty
Avery B Nathens
Tanya Charyk-Stewart
Sandro Rizoli
Lorraine N Tremblay
Frederick Brenneman
Najma Ahmed
Elsie Galbraith
Neil Parry
Murray J Girotti
Guiseppe Pagliarello
Nancy Tze
Kosar Khwaja
Natalie Yanchar
John M Tallon
J Andrew I Trenholm
Candance Tegart
Ofer Amram
Myriam Berube
Usmaan Hameed
Richard K Simons
Author Affiliation
Research Committee of the Trauma Association of Canada, Calgary, Alberta, Canada. morad.hameed@vch.ca
Source
J Trauma. 2010 Dec;69(6):1350-61; discussion 1361
Date
Dec-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Catchment Area (Health)
Health Services Accessibility
Humans
Questionnaires
Rural Population - statistics & numerical data
Trauma Centers
Travel
Abstract
Trauma is a leading cause of morbidity, potential years of life lost and health care expenditure in Canada and around the world. Trauma systems have been established across North America to provide comprehensive injury care and to lead injury control efforts. We sought to describe the current status of trauma systems in Canada and Canadians' access to acute, multidisciplinary trauma care.
A national survey was used to identify the locations and capabilities of adult trauma centers across Canada and to identify the catchment populations they serve. Geographic information science methods were used to map the locations of Level I and Level II trauma centers and to define 1-hour road travel times around each trauma center. Data from the 2006 Canadian Census were used to estimate populations within and outside 1-hour access to definitive trauma care.
In Canada, 32 Level I and Level II trauma centers provide definitive trauma care and coordinate the efforts of their surrounding trauma systems. Most Canadians (77.5%) reside within 1-hour road travel catchments of Level I or Level II centers. However, marked geographic disparities in access persist. Of the 22.5% of Canadians who live more than an hour away from a Level I or Level II trauma centers, all are in rural and remote regions.
Access to high quality acute trauma care is well established across parts of Canada but a clear urban/rural divide persists. Regional efforts to improve short- and long-term outcomes after severe trauma should focus on the optimization of access to pre-hospital care and acute trauma care in rural communities using locally relevant strategies or novel care delivery options.
PubMed ID
20838258 View in PubMed
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[A clinico-epidemiological analysis of Huntington's chorea in the population of Astrakhan].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature222331
Source
Zh Nevrol Psikhiatr Im S S Korsakova. 1993;93(5):9-11
Publication Type
Article
Date
1993

Active transportation environments surrounding Canadian schools.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature130132
Source
Can J Public Health. 2011 Sep-Oct;102(5):364-8
Publication Type
Article
Author
Sean O'Loghlen
J William Pickett
Ian Janssen
Author Affiliation
School of Medicine, Queen's University, Kingston, ON.
Source
Can J Public Health. 2011 Sep-Oct;102(5):364-8
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Bicycling - statistics & numerical data
Canada
Humans
Motor Activity
Residence Characteristics - statistics & numerical data
Rural Population - statistics & numerical data
Schools - statistics & numerical data
Transportation - legislation & jurisprudence - methods - statistics & numerical data
Urban Population - statistics & numerical data
Walking - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
Walking or cycling to school represents an opportunity for children to engage in physical activity. The study objectives were to: 1) describe active transportation policies, programs, and built environments of Canadian schools and their surrounding neighbourhoods, and 2) document variations based on urban-rural location and school type (primary vs. secondary vs. mixed primary/secondary schools).
397 schools from across Canada were studied. A school administrator completed a questionnaire and responses were used to assess schools' policies and programs related to active transportation and the safety and aesthetics of their respective neighbourhoods. Built environment features in a 1 km-radius circular buffer around each school were measured using geographic information systems.
Greater than 70% of schools had passive policies (e.g., skateboards permitted on school grounds) and facilities (e.g., bicycle racks in secure area to avoid theft) to encourage bicycle and small-wheeled vehicle use. Less than 40% of schools had active programs designed to encourage active transportation, such as organized 'walk to school' days. Garbage in the streets, crime and substance abuse were barriers in most school neighbourhoods. Approximately 42% of schools were located on high-speed roads not amenable to active transportation and 14% did not have a sidewalk leading to the school. Secondary schools had less favourable active transportation policies/programs and neighbourhood safety/aesthetics compared to primary schools. Rural schools had less favourable built environments than urban schools.
Canadian children, particularly those from rural areas, face a number of impediments to active transportation as a method of travelling to school.
PubMed ID
22032103 View in PubMed
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Age, gender, and urban-rural differences in the correlates of physical activity.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature177461
Source
Prev Med. 2004 Dec;39(6):1115-25
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2004
Author
Ronald C Plotnikoff
Alain Mayhew
Nicholas Birkett
Constantinos A Loucaides
George Fodor
Author Affiliation
Center for Health Promotion Studies, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada T6G 2T4. ron.plotnikoff@ualberta.ca
Source
Prev Med. 2004 Dec;39(6):1115-25
Date
Dec-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Canada
Exercise - physiology
Female
Health Behavior
Humans
Male
Marital status
Middle Aged
Rural Population - statistics & numerical data
Sex Factors
Socioeconomic Factors
Urban Population - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
The majority of the population is inactive, and strategies to date for promoting regular physical activity have been limited in their effectiveness. Further research is needed to identify correlates of physical activity in different subgroups to design more efficacious interventions. This study sought to identify correlates of physical activity across men and women, urban and rural geographical locations, and four distinct age groups (18-25; 26-45; 46-59; and 60+).
This study employed data from a large provincial household random sample (N = 20,606) of Canadians. Analyses were utilized to examine the amount of variance explained in self-reported physical activity by a number of demographic and/or biological, psychological, behavioral, social, and environmental variables within each subgroup.
Proportion of friends who exercise, injury from past physical activity, educational level, perceived health status, and alcohol consumption were among the strongest correlates across subgroups.
A number of correlates were identified as being significant across all subgroups examined. Most differences in the correlates of physical activity were found within different age groups rather than among urban and rural residents and gender.
PubMed ID
15539045 View in PubMed
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[A genetic epidemiological study of arterial hypertension in an isolated mountain area of Dagestan].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature213134
Source
Ter Arkh. 1996;68(12):64-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
1996
Author
G G Guseinov
I A Shamov
K B Bulaeva
Source
Ter Arkh. 1996;68(12):64-6
Date
1996
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alleles
Altitude
Consanguinity
Dagestan - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Hypertension - ethnology - genetics
Incidence
Male
Molecular Epidemiology
Phenotype
Prevalence
Questionnaires
Rural Population - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
Hereditary factors of arterial hypertension were evaluated genetically and epidemiologically in the study of an isolated population of Dagestan with high inbreeding. High prevalence of arterial hypertension was found. Its highest morbidity was found in native population of Tukhums characterized also by the highest inbreeding.
PubMed ID
9054045 View in PubMed
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Agreement between staff and service users concerning the clientele's mental health needs: a Quebec study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature167409
Source
Can J Psychiatry. 2006 Apr;51(5):281-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2006
Author
Marie-Josée Fleury
Guy Grenier
Alain Lesage
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychiatry, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec. flemar@douglas.mcgill.ca
Source
Can J Psychiatry. 2006 Apr;51(5):281-6
Date
Apr-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Cooperative Behavior
Female
Humans
Male
Mental Disorders - epidemiology - therapy
Mental Health Services - standards - utilization
Needs Assessment
Professional-Patient Relations
Quebec - epidemiology
Rural Population - statistics & numerical data
Urban Population - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
This article examines the differences found between clientele with severe mental health problems and their key health workers in terms of assessing service users' needs in 6 Quebec service areas.
We questioned 165 pairs of users and staff, using the Camberwell Assessment of Needs questionnaire. The profile of serious and overall problems encountered by clientele from each of the sites was compared.
The sites with the greatest degree of user-staff agreement in identifying problems were also the ones where users considered that local services best met their needs.
The study demonstrated that, in needs assessment, major differences exist between the perceptions of users and their key workers in the various sites. These differences can be explained in part by users' individual characteristics, by types of needs, by local particularities, and by service use.
PubMed ID
16986817 View in PubMed
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537 records – page 1 of 54.