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Trends of smoking prevalence among Lithuanian school-aged children in 1994-2006.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature146835
Source
Medicina (Kaunas). 2009;45(10):798-806
Publication Type
Article
Date
2009
Author
Apolinaras Zaborskis
Linas Sumskas
Nida Zemaitiene
Vilius Grabauskas
Aurelijus Veryga
Robertas Petkevicius
Author Affiliation
Laboratory for Social Pediatrics, Institute for Biomedical Research, Kaunas University of Medicine, Eiveniu 4, 50009 Kaunas, Lithuania. apolinaras.zaborskis@kmu.lt
Source
Medicina (Kaunas). 2009;45(10):798-806
Date
2009
Language
English
Lithuanian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adolescent Behavior
Age Factors
Child
Data Collection
Data Interpretation, Statistical
Databases as Topic
Female
Health Behavior
Health Surveys
Humans
Lithuania - epidemiology
Male
Norway
Questionnaires
Rural Population
Sex Factors
Smoking - epidemiology - prevention & control - trends
Smoking Cessation - statistics & numerical data
Time Factors
Urban Population
World Health Organization
Abstract
BACKGROUND. Despite much effort spent on antismoking programs in schools in different countries, limited effects have been observed in many cases. Evidence from European countries shows that active tobacco control actions such as ban on tobacco advertising, increase of tobacco taxes could lead to successful results. Our study was aimed to analyze time trends on smoking in Lithuanian school-aged children during the period of 1994-2006 in the context of antismoking policies, which were implemented in Lithuania. MATERIAL AND METHODS. This study was a part of WHO Cross-National Health Behavior in School-Aged Children (HBSC) study carried out in Lithuania. The standardized methods of international HBSC study protocol were applied. Stratified random representative samples of 5428, 4513, 5645, and 5632 students aged 11, 13, and 15 years were included into school-based anonymous questionnaire surveys in 1994, 1998, 2002, and 2006, respectively (spring semester). Questions on frequency of smoking, age of initiation and other questions were included. Response rates of each of these four questionnaire surveys were higher than 90%. RESULTS. Smoking behavior was more common among boys. The prevalence gap in smoking between boys and girls diminished during period of observation. Prevalence of smoking increased significantly among boys during the period of 1994-2002 (11.3%, 19.8%, and 23.6% in 1994, 1998, and 2002, respectively), but started to decline after (17.3% in 2006, P0.05). Urban girls have reported smoking more frequently in comparison with rural girls. CONCLUSIONS. An increase in tobacco smoking among school-aged children was observed in Lithuania during 1994-2002. A decrease in prevalence of smoking was seen during the period of 2002-2006. These trends could be related to the implementation of tobacco control measures in Lithuania.
PubMed ID
19996667 View in PubMed
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