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Additional skills training for rural physicians. Alberta's rural physician action plan.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature169033
Source
Can Fam Physician. 2006 May;52:601-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2006
Author
Ron Gorsche
John Hnatuik
Author Affiliation
Department of Family Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, University of Calgary. john.hnatuik@rpap.ab.ca
Source
Can Fam Physician. 2006 May;52:601-4
Date
May-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alberta
Education, Medical, Continuing - organization & administration
Family Practice - education - manpower
Humans
Medically underserved area
Personnel Selection
Preceptorship - organization & administration
Rural Health Services - manpower
Abstract
Rural physicians in Alberta identified access to special skills training and upgrading skills as an important practice requirement.
The Rural Physician Action Plan in Alberta developed an Enrichment Program to assist physicians practising in rural Alberta communities to upgrade their existing skills or gain new skills. The Enrichment Program aimed to provide a single point of entry to skills training that was individualized and based on the needs of rural physicians.
Two experienced rural physicians were engaged as "skills brokers" to help rural physicians requesting additional skills training or upgrading to find the training they required. Physicians interested in applying for the Enrichment Program consulted one of the brokers. Each applicant was assigned a preceptor. Preceptors confirmed learning objectives with trainees, provided the required training in keeping with agreed-upon learning objectives, and ensured trainees were evaluated at the end of the training.
The program has helped rural physicians upgrade their skills and gain new skills. More Alberta rural physicians are now able to pursue additional training and return to practise new skills in their rural and remote communities than in the past.
Notes
Cites: J Rural Health. 1994 Summer;10(3):183-9210138034
Cites: CMAJ. 1998 Feb 10;158(3):351-59484262
PubMed ID
16739833 View in PubMed
Less detail

[A honorary doctor in a sparsely populated region...He follows his patients from the birth and may play at funerals].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature210325
Source
Lakartidningen. 1996 Dec 18;93(51-52):4700-2
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-18-1996
Author
G. Fällman m
Source
Lakartidningen. 1996 Dec 18;93(51-52):4700-2
Date
Dec-18-1996
Language
Swedish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
History, 20th Century
Humans
Physicians, Family
Rural Health Services - manpower
Sweden
PubMed ID
9011707 View in PubMed
Less detail

[An ambulatory service staffed with military physicians in a rural district. Experiences from a period of 6 years].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature206961
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1997 Nov 24;159(48):7145-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-24-1997
Author
S B Laursen
H. Gøtze
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1997 Nov 24;159(48):7145-9
Date
Nov-24-1997
Language
Danish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Ambulances
Denmark
Emergency Medical Services - manpower - standards - statistics & numerical data
Evaluation Studies as Topic
Humans
Military Personnel
Physicians
Retrospective Studies
Rural Health Services - manpower - standards - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
A local rendez-vous arrangement is described retrospectively in which the medical officer on duty at the infirmary, Oksbøl military camp participated in the ambulance service and the prehospital treatment of acutely ill patients. The military ambulance supports the civilian ambulance service in the municipality of Blåvandshuk, Western Jutland. This arrangement was carried out in 430 cases and 399 patients were brought to hospital. More than 14% of the services did not result in transportation. Forty-seven percent of the services were due to accidents and 30% to illness. In 16% of all cases the response-time was less than five minutes. All the patients were classified according to the Oksbøl-score. Injuries were diagnosed in 48% and cardiovascular disease in 19%. Sixty-seven percent were treated immediately by the military ambulance. This arrangement has improved the prehospital treatment of acutely ill patients by using pre-existing resources from a military camp. We propose further cooperation between civilian health authorities and the Danish Armed Forces' Health Services when planning the prehospital services.
PubMed ID
9417721 View in PubMed
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An exploratory study of factors influencing resuscitation skills retention and performance among health providers.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature123106
Source
J Contin Educ Health Prof. 2012;32(2):126-33
Publication Type
Article
Date
2012
Author
Vernon Curran
Lisa Fleet
Melanie Greene
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Medicine, Memorial University of Newfoundland, Canada. vcurran@mun.ca
Source
J Contin Educ Health Prof. 2012;32(2):126-33
Date
2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Certification
Clinical Competence - standards - statistics & numerical data
Education, Medical, Continuing - standards
Educational Measurement
Female
Focus Groups
Health Personnel - psychology
Humans
Life Support Care - psychology
Male
Newfoundland and Labrador
Qualitative Research
Questionnaires
Regional Health Planning
Resuscitation - education
Retention (Psychology)
Rural Health Services - manpower
Urban Health Services - manpower
Abstract
Resuscitation and life support skills training comprises a significant proportion of continuing education programming for health professionals. The purpose of this study was to explore the perceptions and attitudes of certified resuscitation providers toward the retention of resuscitation skills, regular skills updating, and methods for enhancing retention.
A mixed-methods, explanatory study design was undertaken utilizing focus groups and an online survey-questionnaire of rural and urban health care providers.
Rural providers reported less experience with real codes and lower abilities across a variety of resuscitation areas. Mock codes, practice with an instructor and a team, self-practice with a mannequin, and e-learning were popular methods for skills updating. Aspects of team performance that were felt to influence resuscitation performance included: discrepancies in skill levels, lack of communication, and team leaders not up to date on their skills. Confidence in resuscitation abilities was greatest after one had recently practiced or participated in an update or an effective debriefing session. Lowest confidence was reported when team members did not work well together, there was no clear leader of the resuscitation code, or if team members did not communicate.
The study findings highlight the importance of access to update methods for improving providers' confidence and abilities, and the need for emphasis on teamwork training in resuscitation. An eclectic approach combining methods may be the best strategy for addressing the needs of health professionals across various clinical departments and geographic locales.
PubMed ID
22733640 View in PubMed
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Source
Can J Rural Med. 2004;9(2):75-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
2004
Author
John Wootton
Source
Can J Rural Med. 2004;9(2):75-6
Date
2004
Language
English
French
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Canada
Career Choice
Humans
Male
Rural Health Services - manpower
Rural Population
PubMed ID
15603678 View in PubMed
Less detail

Attracting small-town docs a challenge.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature120995
Source
CMAJ. 2012 Oct 2;184(14):E735-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2-2012

The Barcelona International Symposium (21-23 April 2005). Synthesis reports.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature171960
Source
Cah Sociol Demogr Med. 2005 Apr-Sep;45(2-3):327-64
Publication Type
Article
Conference/Meeting Material
Author
Kisalaya Basu
Nadia Danon-Hersch
Johan Frisack
Mireille Kingma
Josep Maria Martinez-Carretero
Klas Oberg
Raymond W Pong
Author Affiliation
Microsimulation, Modelling and Data Analysis Division, Health Canada, Ottawa, Ontario.
Source
Cah Sociol Demogr Med. 2005 Apr-Sep;45(2-3):327-64
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Conference/Meeting Material
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aging
Canada
Emigration and Immigration
Female
Forecasting
Health Manpower - trends
Health Personnel - trends
Health planning
Health services needs and demand
Humans
Male
Medically underserved area
Medicine - trends
National Health Programs
Physicians - supply & distribution
Physicians, Women - supply & distribution
Rural Health Services - manpower
Socioeconomic Factors
Spain
Specialization
State Medicine
United States
Abstract
The Symposium was held in Barcelona, Spain, with the Institut d'Estudis de la Salut acting as host. It gathered 51 participants working in 34 institutions based in 18 countries. The main objective of the Symposium was to create an opportunity for assessing the past trends and forecasting the future developments of health workforce within the various national health systems. The Symposium was composed of 5 sessions devoted to presentations of the papers freely contributed by the participants and 5 discussion sessions devoted to the following themes : (i) Supply of and demand for health workforce, (ii) Future trends and forecasting methods ; (iii) Strategies for managing and planning health workforce ; (iv) Health workforce in underserved areas; (v) International migration of health workers. Each discussion session was conducted by a discussion leader whose the synthesis report is displayed here below.
PubMed ID
16285408 View in PubMed
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Bridging the gap: innovative approaches to continuing education in rural, remote, and isolated first nation communities.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature116349
Source
Semin Dial. 2013 Mar-Apr;26(2):164-8
Publication Type
Article
Author
Tracy Scott
Cynthia Menzies
Glen Chenard
Melissa Spence
Author Affiliation
Saint Elizabeth First Nations, Inuit and Métis Program, Winnipeg, Manitoba. tscott@saintelizabeth.com
Source
Semin Dial. 2013 Mar-Apr;26(2):164-8
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Education, Nursing, Continuing - trends
Humans
Indians, North American
Internet
Inuits
Minority Groups
Nephrology - education
Rural Health Services - manpower
Rural Population
Abstract
Access to education, communication, and support is essential for achieving and maintaining a skilled healthcare workforce. Delivering affordable and accessible continuing education for healthcare providers in rural, remote, and isolated First Nation communities is challenging due to barriers such as geography, isolation, costs, and staff shortages. The innovative use of technology, such as on-line courses and webinars, will be presented as a highly effective approach to increase access to continuing education for healthcare providers in these settings. A case study will be presented demonstrating how a national, not-for-profit health care organization has partnered with healthcare providers in these communities to support care at the local level through various technology-based knowledge exchange activities.
PubMed ID
23406312 View in PubMed
Less detail

The Canadian contribution to the US physician workforce.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature164219
Source
CMAJ. 2007 Apr 10;176(8):1083-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-10-2007
Author
Robert L Phillips
Stephen Petterson
George E Fryer
Walter Rosser
Author Affiliation
The Robert Graham Center, Policy Studies in Family Medicine and Primary Care, Washington, DC 20036, USA.
Source
CMAJ. 2007 Apr 10;176(8):1083-7
Date
Apr-10-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada - epidemiology
Cross-Sectional Studies
Databases as Topic
Emigration and Immigration
Foreign Medical Graduates - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Medicine - statistics & numerical data
Personnel Selection
Physicians - statistics & numerical data - supply & distribution
Professional Practice Location
Rural Health Services - manpower
Specialization
United States - epidemiology
Abstract
A physician shortage has been declared in both Canada and the United States. We sought to examine the migration pattern of Canadian-trained physicians to the United States, the contribution of this migration to the Canadian physician shortage and policy options in light of competing shortages in both countries.
We performed a cross-sectional analysis of the 2004 and 2006 American Medical Association Physician Masterfiles, the 2002 Area Resource File and data from the Canadian Institute for Health Information, the Canadian Medical Association and the Association of Faculties of Medicine of Canada. We describe the migration pattern of Canadian medical school graduates to the United States, the number of Canadian-trained physicians in the United States in 2006, the proportion who were in active practice, the proportion who were practising in rural or underserved areas and the annual contribution of Canadian-trained physicians to the US physician workforce.
Two-thirds of the 12 040 Canadian-educated physicians living in the United States in 2006 were practising in direct patient care, 1023 in rural areas. About 186, or 1 in 9, Canadian-educated physicians from each graduating class joined the US physician workforce providing direct patient care. Canadian-educated physicians are more likely than US-educated physicians to practise in rural areas.
Minimizing emigration, and perhaps recruiting physicians to return to Canada, could reduce physician shortages, particularly in subspecialties and rural areas. In light of competing physician shortages, it will be important to consider policy options that reduce emigration, improve access to care and reduce reliance on physicians from developing countries.
Notes
Cites: J Am Board Fam Pract. 1996 Mar-Apr;9(2):94-98659271
Cites: Health Serv Res. 2004 Oct;39(5):1251-515333107
Cites: CMAJ. 1996 Jan 15;154(2):171-818548706
Cites: N Engl J Med. 2005 Oct 27;353(17):1810-816251537
Cites: CMAJ. 2005 Jan 4;172(1):62-515632407
Cites: CMAJ. 2005 Sep 13;173(6):589-9016157718
Comment In: CMAJ. 2007 Apr 10;176(8):1057, 105917420482
PubMed ID
17420490 View in PubMed
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172 records – page 1 of 18.