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2137 records – page 1 of 214.

[1-year patient statistics in Kälarne with diagnosis and remission registration at the medical centre]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature41895
Source
Lakartidningen. 1977 Aug 17;74(33):2759-62
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-17-1977

[2-physician station in Alvsbyn, Norrbotten County]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature74770
Source
Lakartidningen. 1971 Jan 27;68(5):428-31
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-27-1971

[7 years' experience in organizing sanatorium wards for children with rheumatism in a rural locale of Lvov Province]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature43746
Source
Pediatr Akus Ginekol. 1972;4:27
Publication Type
Article
Date
1972
Author
V P Ferents
Iu V Manchenko
Source
Pediatr Akus Ginekol. 1972;4:27
Date
1972
Language
Ukrainian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Child
Hospitals, Special
Humans
Rheumatic Diseases - therapy
Rural Health
Ukraine
PubMed ID
4545065 View in PubMed
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21st century rural nursing: Navajo Traditional and Western medicine.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature187143
Source
Nurs Adm Q. 2002;26(5):47-57
Publication Type
Article
Date
2002
Author
Barbara L O'Brien
Rosemary M Anslow
Wanda Begay
Sister Benvinda A Pereira
Mary Pat Sullivan
Author Affiliation
Magnetic Health Care Strategies, LLC, Middletown, New Jersey, USA.
Source
Nurs Adm Q. 2002;26(5):47-57
Date
2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Arizona
Case Management - organization & administration
Health Services, Indigenous - organization & administration
Humans
Indians, North American
Medicine, Traditional
New Mexico
Nurse practitioners
Rural health services - organization & administration
Abstract
Past experiences enhance the future. Health care providers gaining expertise in creative thinking, traditional medicine, spirituality, and cultural sensitivity is an essential requirement for 21st century health care. We must stay mindful that poverty, isolation, and rural living may create new forms of social exclusion because of lack of communication and rapidly changing technology. Conversely, sensory overload resulting from a faster paced lifestyle and rapid enhancements in technology may cause increased tension and stress. This article reviews successes that may offer the reader ideas on coping with the provision of health care services in such a volatile changing environment, while honoring tradition and cultural competency.
PubMed ID
12515233 View in PubMed
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1997 Alaska training and employment opportunities for primary care health professionals: a resources guide for students and employers.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature288931
Source
Juneau: Alaska Dept. of Health and Social Services, Division of Public Health, Section of Community Health and Emergency Medical Services. 37 pages.
Publication Type
Book/Book Chapter
Date
1997
Source
Juneau: Alaska Dept. of Health and Social Services, Division of Public Health, Section of Community Health and Emergency Medical Services. 37 pages.
Date
1997
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Publication Type
Book/Book Chapter
Physical Holding
University of Alaska Anchorage
Keywords
Alaska
Community health aides
Rural Health Services
Primary Health Care
Notes
ALASKA RA427.A45 1997
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The 2009 H1N1 pandemic response in remote First Nation communities of Subarctic Ontario: barriers and improvements from a health care services perspective.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature130157
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2011;70(5):564-75
Publication Type
Article
Date
2011
Author
Nadia A Charania
Leonard J S Tsuji
Author Affiliation
Department of Environment and Resource Studies, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, ON N2L 3G1, Canada. ncharani@uwaterloo.ca
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2011;70(5):564-75
Date
2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Attitude of Health Personnel
Catchment Area (Health)
Federal Government
Female
Humans
Influenza A Virus, H1N1 Subtype
Influenza, Human - epidemiology - prevention & control
Information Dissemination
Male
Medically underserved area
Middle Aged
Ontario
Pandemics - prevention & control - statistics & numerical data
Patient Acceptance of Health Care - ethnology
Professional-Patient Relations
Retrospective Studies
Rural health services - organization & administration
Abstract
To retrospectively examine the barriers faced and opportunities for improvement during the 2009 H1N1 pandemic response experienced by participants responsible for the delivery of health care services in 3 remote and isolated Subarctic First Nation communities of northern Ontario, Canada.
A qualitative community-based participatory approach.
Semi-directed interviews were conducted with adult key informants (n=13) using purposive sampling of participants representing the 3 main sectors responsible for health care services (i.e., federal health centres, provincial hospitals and Band Councils). Data were manually transcribed and coded using deductive and inductive thematic analysis.
Primary barriers reported were issues with overcrowding in houses, insufficient human resources and inadequate community awareness. Main areas for improvement included increasing human resources (i.e., nurses and trained health care professionals), funding for supplies and general community awareness regarding disease processes and prevention.
Government bodies should consider focusing efforts to provide more support in terms of human resources, monies and education. In addition, various government organizations should collaborate to improve housing conditions and timely access to resources. These recommendations should be addressed in future pandemic plans, so that remote western James Bay First Nation communities of Subarctic Ontario and other similar communities can be better prepared for the next public health emergency.
PubMed ID
22030007 View in PubMed
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Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women's health: acting now for a healthy future.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature153251
Source
Aust N Z J Obstet Gynaecol. 2008 Dec;48(6):526-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2008
Author
Jacqueline Boyle
Alice R Rumbold
Marilyn Clarke
Chris Hughes
Simon Kane
Source
Aust N Z J Obstet Gynaecol. 2008 Dec;48(6):526-8
Date
Dec-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Female
Forecasting
Gynecology - standards
Humans
Maternal Age
Obstetrics - standards
Oceanic Ancestry Group
Pregnancy
Risk factors
Rural Health
Socioeconomic Factors
Women's Health - legislation & jurisprudence
Abstract
This paper summarises the recent RANZCOG Indigenous Women's Health Meeting with recommendations on how the College and its membership can act now to improve the health of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women and infants.
PubMed ID
19133037 View in PubMed
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Abortion in Thailand and Sweden: health services and short-term consequences.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature65618
Source
Ciba Found Symp. 1985;115:54-66
Publication Type
Article
Date
1985
Author
T N Singnomklao
Source
Ciba Found Symp. 1985;115:54-66
Date
1985
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Abortion, Criminal
Abortion, Induced - methods - trends
Abortion, Legal
Comparative Study
Cross-Cultural Comparison
Female
Humans
Massage
Medicine, Traditional
Pregnancy
Risk
Rural Health - trends
Sweden
Thailand
Abstract
In Thailand, where abortion is still illegal, abortion services (health services) outside Bangkok, and outside hospitals or clinics, are provided by non-physician practitioners. In the studies reported here, those practitioners were interviewed in 1978 and 1981 about their methods and the characteristics of their clients. The first study revealed that massage is the method most widely used by rural practitioners and that uterine injection with different solutions comes second. The second study was in agreement with these findings. The health consequences of these induced abortions were studied by interviewing the clients of the rural practitioners in 1980 and 1981. In Sweden, where abortion has been legal for quite a long time, all women who need an abortion have access to safe and convenient health services throughout the country.
PubMed ID
3849419 View in PubMed
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Abridged version of the Society of Rural Physicians of Canada's discussion paper on rural hospital service closures.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature149706
Source
Can J Rural Med. 2009;14(3):111-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
2009
Author
Peter Hutten-Czapski
Author Affiliation
Society of Rural Physicians of Canada, Shawville, Que. phc@srpc.ca
Source
Can J Rural Med. 2009;14(3):111-4
Date
2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Cost Savings
Health Facility Closure
Hospitals, Rural - economics - supply & distribution
Humans
Quality of Health Care
Regional Health Planning
Rural Health Services
Rural Population
Societies, Medical
PubMed ID
19594995 View in PubMed
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2137 records – page 1 of 214.