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12 records – page 1 of 2.

Adolescent girls in need of protection.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature245887
Source
Am J Orthopsychiatry. 1980 Apr;50(2):264-78
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-1980
Author
J A Byles
Source
Am J Orthopsychiatry. 1980 Apr;50(2):264-78
Date
Apr-1980
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Child Abuse
Child Welfare
Family Characteristics
Female
Humans
Juvenile Delinquency - rehabilitation
Mental Disorders - rehabilitation
Ontario
Prisons
Residential Treatment
Runaway Behavior
Suicide - psychology
Abstract
This descriptive study of 120 girls removed temporarily from parental care during early adolescence raises questions regarding the efficiency and effectiveness of current intervention strategies. The findings suggest that clinical and legal efforts on behalf of girls such as these, who have been victims of neglect, deprivation, and abuse, are likely to remain unsatisfactory in the absence of a broad societal commitment to the needs and rights of children.
PubMed ID
7361875 View in PubMed
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[Clinico-pathogenetic patterns in the development of the runaway syndrome in children and adolescents (according to the findings of a clinico-epidemiologic study)].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature241283
Source
Zh Nevropatol Psikhiatr Im S S Korsakova. 1984;84(10):1520-3
Publication Type
Article
Date
1984
Author
T N Dmitrieva
Source
Zh Nevropatol Psikhiatr Im S S Korsakova. 1984;84(10):1520-3
Date
1984
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Age Factors
Brain Damage, Chronic - psychology
Child
Family
Female
Humans
Intellectual Disability - psychology
Male
Personality Disorders - psychology
Runaway Behavior
Russia
Schizophrenic Psychology
Sex Factors
Urban Population
Abstract
A clinico-epidemiological study involved children and adolescents with a history of home abandoning and tramping who live in two administrative districts of a big city. The study was aimed at investigating the prevalence of the dromomania syndrome in the children and adolescents of the given districts, the specification of the nosological and syndromal characteristics of the patients, and eliciting the etiopathogenetic role of various factors (social, communal and biological) in the formation of this syndrome. The findings obtained are indicative of the prevalence of the dromomania syndrome in children and adolescents and of the proportion of various forms of psychic pathology in this patient population. The significance of various factors in the etiopathogenesis of the syndrome was found to vary in different nosological forms.
PubMed ID
6239470 View in PubMed
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Developing policies for runaways: insights from the literature.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature227829
Source
J Health Soc Policy. 1991;2(4):51-64
Publication Type
Article
Date
1991
Author
C. Appathurai
Author Affiliation
Ministry of Community and Social Services, Toronto, Ontario.
Source
J Health Soc Policy. 1991;2(4):51-64
Date
1991
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adolescent Health Services - trends
Adolescent, Institutionalized - psychology
Canada
Health Policy
Homeless Persons - psychology
Humans
Runaway Behavior
United States
Abstract
This article examines the literature on runaways from an historical perspective. It argues that societal responses to runaways have been structured by the prevailing assumptions about the nature and meaning of runaway behaviour. The recurring theme of detachment and connection is highlighted and its implication for policy development is examined.
PubMed ID
10170841 View in PubMed
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Pathways and cycles of runaways: a model for understanding repetitive runaway behavior.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature235518
Source
Hosp Community Psychiatry. 1987 Mar;38(3):292-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-1987
Author
C R Hartman
A W Burgess
A. McCormack
Source
Hosp Community Psychiatry. 1987 Mar;38(3):292-9
Date
Mar-1987
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Adolescent
Child Abuse - psychology
Child Abuse, Sexual - psychology
Female
Humans
Internal-External Control
Juvenile Delinquency - psychology
Life Change Events
Male
Ontario
Recurrence
Runaway Behavior
Abstract
Based on information provided by 149 runaways staying in a Canadian shelter, the authors developed a model that explains repititious running away as the result of youths' cognitive confusion and unrealistic beliefs. The majority of the youths, who had run away an average of 8.9 times, felt that the events that led them to run away were unpredictable, yet 54 percent blamed only themselves for what happened. The paper describes the pathways, cycles, and outcomes of running away; analyzes the relationship between the youths' experiences with prostitution, delinquency, and sexual and physical abuse and the length of time they had been away from home; summarizes the youths' reasons for running away; compares the beliefs of runaways with and without a history of sexual abuse; and discusses interventions.
PubMed ID
3557359 View in PubMed
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A proactive approach to youth who run.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature201175
Source
Child Abuse Negl. 1999 Jul;23(7):693-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-1999
Author
N D English
L M English
Author Affiliation
Department of Social Services, Government of Newfoundland and Labrador, Newfoundland, Canada.
Source
Child Abuse Negl. 1999 Jul;23(7):693-8
Date
Jul-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Child
Child Welfare
Female
Homeless Youth - psychology
Humans
Male
Newfoundland and Labrador
Runaway Behavior - psychology
Social Work
PubMed ID
10442834 View in PubMed
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Protective factors and social risk factors for hospitalization and mortality among young men.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature75147
Source
Am J Epidemiol. 1992 Mar 15;135(6):649-58
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-15-1992
Author
A. Romelsjö
G A Kaplan
R D Cohen
P. Allebeck
S. Andreasson
Author Affiliation
Department of Social Medicine, Karolinska Institute, Sundbyberg, Sweden.
Source
Am J Epidemiol. 1992 Mar 15;135(6):649-58
Date
Mar-15-1992
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Crime
Divorce
Follow-Up Studies
Health status
Hospitalization - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Internal-External Control
Male
Mortality
Peer Group
Prognosis
Proportional Hazards Models
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Runaway Behavior
Social Class
Social Environment
Substance-Related Disorders - complications
Sweden
Abstract
The association between presumed protective factors and social risk factors for hospitalization and mortality was studied during a 14-year follow-up period in a cohort of 8,168 Swedish men aged 18-20 years at baseline. Using Cox regression analysis, the authors found that five protective factors (high social class, home well-being, school well-being, good emotional control, and self-perceived good health) were associated with lower risks of hospitalization and death. Four social risk factors (contact with police or child welfare authorities, running away from home, having divorced parents, and ever using narcotics) were significantly associated with increased risk of hospitalization and mortality. The relative hazard decreased with the number of protective factors and increased with the number of social risk factors, almost linearly. The relative hazard was 0.24 for hospitalization among those with six protective factors and 0.24 for mortality for those with five or six protective factors. The relative hazard for hospitalization was 3.09 among those with five social risk factors compared with those with none, while for mortality the relative hazard among those with four or five social risk factors was 5.74 compared with those with none. While these results indicate strong cumulative effects for both the social risk factors and the protective factors, the associations of individual factors with the two outcome measures were generally reduced in models which simultaneously adjusted for all factors, which presumably indicates collinearity among the factors. There was only limited support for a buffering, or interacting, effect between the risk factors and the protective factors.
PubMed ID
1580241 View in PubMed
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Similarities in drug use and depression among runaway students and street youth.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature219166
Source
Can J Public Health. 1994 Jan-Feb;85(1):17-8
Publication Type
Article
Source
J Health Soc Policy. 1991;2(4):37-49
Publication Type
Article
Date
1991
Author
K. Kufeldt
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Social Welfare, University of Calgary, Alberta, Canada.
Source
J Health Soc Policy. 1991;2(4):37-49
Date
1991
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adolescent Health Services
Canada
Health Policy
Health services needs and demand
Homeless Persons - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Parent-Child Relations
Runaway Behavior
Abstract
This paper examines the relationship between social policy and the phenomenon of runaways and their health. Through an exploration of the literature and reference to empirical studies, including the author's own work, it provides background and establishes the relationship between being in care and running. Assumptions which guide social policy as well as the service delivery itself provide an explanation for the runaway--child welfare connection. The paper concludes with discussion of the implications and recommendations for a policy shift with respect to services for adolescents.
PubMed ID
10170840 View in PubMed
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[Victimization and problems of behavior. Two components of profile types of runaway adolescents].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature181256
Source
Child Abuse Negl. 2004 Feb;28(2):193-208
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2004
Author
Marie Robert
Louise Fournier
Robert Pauzé
Author Affiliation
Ecole de Service Social, Université de Montréal, Centreville, Montreal, Que., Canada.
Source
Child Abuse Negl. 2004 Feb;28(2):193-208
Date
Feb-2004
Language
French
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adolescent Behavior
Adolescent Psychology
Child
Crime Victims
Discriminant Analysis
Female
Homeless Youth - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Male
Multivariate Analysis
Parent-Child Relations
Quebec
Runaway Behavior - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Violence
Abstract
This study examines the relationship between two explanatory factors connected to the phenomena of runaways and the homeless among adolescents: behavioral problems of youths and parental violence to which they are subjected. The study demonstrates that these two factors are independently related to the different categories of homeless and runaway adolescents.
The data was collected from 130 adolescents (12 to 17 years of age) who were runaways for short periods on a recurring basis. Two subgroups were formed: Group A consisted of 79 adolescents who did not exhibit behavioral problems; Group B consisted of the other 51 who did exhibit them. The two groups had certain similar family characteristics (income levels, parents' occupations, structure and stability of the family).
The bivariate analyses reveal significant differences between the two groups of runaways relating to: (1) gender, (2) a diagnosed conduct disorder, (3) affiliations with deviant peers, and (4) experiences of parental violence. The discriminant analysis demonstrates that these four variables clearly differentiate the two groups of runaways and predict the appropriate group membership for 84% of the cases. Therefore, the members of Group B have a higher probability of being diagnosed as having a conduct disorder, being male, and associating with delinquent peers. This group had not experienced a higher level of parental violence. The opposite is true for the members of Group A.
Our study demonstrates that parental violence and behavioral problems are variables that are independently related to the defined categories of runaways. Therefore, these variables do not constitute, as some thinkers have claimed, the components of a unique dynamic able to explain the phenomenon of the runaway. Our results vitiate the doubts sometimes expressed by researchers about the importance of parental violence to the phenomenon of adolescent runaways.
PubMed ID
15003402 View in PubMed
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12 records – page 1 of 2.