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7 records – page 1 of 1.

Can we prevent an increase in the incidence of congenital rubella syndrome in the next decade?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature244370
Source
Can Med Assoc J. 1981 Jul 1;125(1):37-40
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-1-1981
Author
L. Coulombe
W W Rosser
Source
Can Med Assoc J. 1981 Jul 1;125(1):37-40
Date
Jul-1-1981
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Child
Female
Humans
Ontario
Rubella - immunology - prevention & control
Rubella Vaccine - immunology
Vaccination
Abstract
The immunity to rubella of 115 girls aged 10 to 14 years was tested in 1978. The proportion of girls found to be immune was 80%, similar to rates in the prevaccination era. Nearly half of the immunity was from documented vaccination, and the other half was presumably from infection with wild rubella virus. The vaccination failure rate was 12%. Because of declining immunity to rubella of women of child-bearing age, detecting low levels of immunity in these women is becoming increasingly important. Immunization of 12- to 15-month-old children has not been effective. Vaccinating all girls 10 to 12 years old would likely be the most effective method of preventing an increase in the incidence of congenital rubella syndrome in the next decade.
Notes
Cites: N Engl J Med. 1976 Feb 5;294(6):306-10813141
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PubMed ID
7260807 View in PubMed
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Rubella antibody titres and immunization status in a family practice.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature245939
Source
Can Med Assoc J. 1980 Mar 8;122(5):549-52
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-8-1980
Author
D A Mills
K R Parker
C E Evans
Source
Can Med Assoc J. 1980 Mar 8;122(5):549-52
Date
Mar-8-1980
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Antibodies, Viral - analysis
Child
Child, Preschool
Family Practice
Female
Hemagglutination inhibition tests
Humans
Immunity
Infant
Male
Ontario
Retrospective Studies
Risk
Rubella - immunology - prevention & control
Rubella Vaccine - therapeutic use
Rubella virus - immunology
Abstract
Rubella vaccination status and immunity to rubella were studied in 230 "active patients" aged 8 to 22 years in a teaching family practice by means of a chart review and measurement of the rubella antibody titre in a blood sample. Of the 200 patients who submitted a blood sample 161 (80%) were found to be immune, having a rubella hemagglutination-inhibiting antibody titre of 1:16 or greater. Log linear analysis showed that immunity to rubella was independent of a history of rubella, and that 94% of the vaccinated patients versus 74% of the unvaccinated patients (a significant difference; P = 0.007) were immune. In retrospect we estimated that 80% of the study group were protected at the start of the study. After surveillance and follow-up, with vaccination of 27 of the 39 patients identified as susceptible to rubella, this estimated proportion increased to 90%. The study showed that there is nothing to be gained by asking about a history of rubella but that vaccination against this disease is increasing among children aged 5 to 9 years.
Notes
Cites: J Fam Pract. 1976 Feb;3(1):35-61249537
Cites: J Pediatr. 1977 Jan;90(1):1-1212253
Cites: J Pediatr. 1977 Oct;91(4):686-7909002
Cites: Prim Care. 1978 Dec;5(4):717-23253369
Cites: Pediatrics. 1978 Jan;61(1):5-11263873
PubMed ID
7370858 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Rubella immunity among female hospital personnel in Quebec].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature254134
Source
Union Med Can. 1973 Dec;102(12):2533-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1973

Rubella immunization of teenage girls in Iceland and follow-up after a severe rubella epidemic.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature57900
Source
Bull World Health Organ. 1982;60(1):141-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
1982

7 records – page 1 of 1.