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Cancer risks in first-generation immigrants to Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature19166
Source
Int J Cancer. 2002 May 10;99(2):218-28
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-10-2002
Author
Kari Hemminki
Xinjun Li
Kamila Czene
Author Affiliation
Department of Biosciences at Novum, Karolinska Institute, Huddinge, Sweden. kari.hemminki@cnt.ki.se
Source
Int J Cancer. 2002 May 10;99(2):218-28
Date
May-10-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Africa - ethnology
Asia - ethnology
Breast Neoplasms - epidemiology
Chile - ethnology
Databases
Denmark - ethnology
Emigration and Immigration
Endometrial Neoplasms - epidemiology
Europe - ethnology
Female
Humans
Lung Neoplasms - epidemiology
Male
Neoplasms - epidemiology
Netherlands - ethnology
North America - ethnology
Ovarian Neoplasms - epidemiology
Registries
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Romania - ethnology
Sex Characteristics
Stomach Neoplasms - epidemiology
Sweden - epidemiology
Testicular Neoplasms - epidemiology
Thyroid Neoplasms - epidemiology
Turkey - ethnology
Uterine Cervical Neoplasms - epidemiology
Yugoslavia - ethnology
Abstract
We used the nationwide Swedish Family-Cancer Database to analyse cancer risks in 613,000 adult immigrants to Sweden. All the immigrants had become parents in Sweden and their median age at immigration was 24 years for men and 22 years for women. We calculated standardized incidence ratios (SIRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for 18 cancer sites using native Swedes as a reference. Data were also available from compatriot marriages. All cancer was decreased by 5% and 8% for immigrant men and women, respectively. However, most of the male increase was due to lung cancer for which male immigrants showed a 41% excess. Among individual cancer sites and immigrant countries, 110 comparisons were significant, 62 showing protection and 48 an increased risk. Most of the differences between the rates in immigrants and Swedes could be ascribed to the variation of cancer incidence in the indigenous populations. Some high immigrant SIRs were 5.05 (n = 6, 95% CI 1.82-11.06) for stomach cancer in Rumanian women and 2.41 (41, 1.73-3.27) for lung cancer in Dutch men. At some sites, such as testis, prostate, skin (melanoma), kidney, cervix and nervous system, the SIRs for immigrants were decreased; in some groups of immigrants SIRs were about 0.20. The highest rates for testicular cancer were noted for Danes and Chileans. Women from Yugoslavia and Turkey had an excess of thyroid tumours. All immigrant groups showed breast, endometrial and ovarian cancers at or below the Swedish level but the differences were no more than 2-fold.
Notes
Comment In: Int J Cancer. 2002 Sep 20;101(3):298; author reply 29912209983
PubMed ID
11979437 View in PubMed
Less detail

DNA sequence analysis of Hb Leiden [beta6(A3) or beta7(A4) Glu-->0].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature200824
Source
Hemoglobin. 1999 Aug;23(3):299-301
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-1999
Author
J D Hoyer
M J Wick
K. Snow
W. Finkelstein
V F Fairbanks
Author Affiliation
Department of Laboratory Medicine and Pathology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN 55905, USA. jhoyer@mayo.edu
Source
Hemoglobin. 1999 Aug;23(3):299-301
Date
Aug-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Anemia, Hemolytic - genetics
Glutamic Acid
Hemoglobins, Abnormal - chemistry - genetics
Heterozygote
Humans
Jews - genetics
Male
Romania - ethnology
Russia - ethnology
Sequence Analysis, DNA
United States - epidemiology
PubMed ID
10490146 View in PubMed
Less detail

Emotion understanding in postinstitutionalized Eastern European children.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature177920
Source
Dev Psychopathol. 2004;16(2):355-69
Publication Type
Article
Date
2004
Author
Alison B Wismer Fries
Seth D Pollak
Author Affiliation
University of Wisconsin at Madison, 53706-8190, USA.
Source
Dev Psychopathol. 2004;16(2):355-69
Date
2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Adoption - psychology
Awareness
Child
Child Abuse - psychology
Child, Institutionalized - psychology
Child, Preschool
Cross-Cultural Comparison
Emotions
Facial Expression
Female
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Male
Orphanages
Personality Development
Psychosocial Deprivation
Risk factors
Romania - ethnology
Russia - ethnology
Social Environment
Socialization
United States
Abstract
To examine the effects of early emotional neglect on children's affective development, we assessed children who had experienced institutionalized care prior to adoption into family environments. One task required children to identify photographs of facial expressions of emotion. A second task required children to match facial expressions to an emotional situation. Internationally adopted, postinstitutionalized children had difficulty identifying facial expressions of emotion. In addition, postinstitutionalized children had significant difficulty matching appropriate facial expressions to happy, sad, and fearful scenarios. However, postinstitutionalized children performed as well as comparison children when asked to identify and match angry facial expressions. These results are discussed in terms of the importance of emotional input early in life on later developmental organization.
Notes
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PubMed ID
15487600 View in PubMed
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Neuroendocrine dysregulation following early social deprivation in children.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature155817
Source
Dev Psychobiol. 2008 Sep;50(6):588-99
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2008
Author
Alison B Wismer Fries
Elizabeth A Shirtcliff
Seth D Pollak
Author Affiliation
University of Wisconsin at Madison, Department of Psychology, Madison, WI 53706, USA. abwismer@wisc.edu
Source
Dev Psychobiol. 2008 Sep;50(6):588-99
Date
Sep-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adoption - psychology
Body Height
Body Weight
Caregivers - psychology
Child Abuse - psychology
Child, Institutionalized - psychology
Child, Preschool
Female
Humans
Hydrocortisone - urine
Hypothalamo-Hypophyseal System - physiopathology
Infant
Interpersonal Relations
Male
Mothers - psychology
Orphanages
Pituitary-Adrenal System - physiopathology
Romania - ethnology
Russia - ethnology
Social Isolation - psychology
Stress, Psychological - psychology - urine
United States
Abstract
Human and nonhuman animal studies reveal that early experiences with caregivers shape children's ability to regulate their responses to stress. To understand the effects of early deprivation on the regulation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis following social interactions, we examined urinary cortisol levels in a group of internationally adopted children who had experienced institutional care, and thus, species-atypical attachment relationships, early in life prior to adoption. Cortisol regulation was assessed both basally and following standardized interpersonal interactions between the child and his/her mother and the child and an unfamiliar adult. Postinstitutionalized children showed prolonged elevations in cortisol levels following the mother, but not the stranger, interaction. More severe neglect was associated with the highest basal cortisol levels and the most impaired cortisol regulation following the mother interaction. These results suggest that early social deprivation may contribute to long-term regulatory problems of the stress-responsive system, and that these differences are most evident within the context of ongoing, close interpersonal relationships.
Notes
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PubMed ID
18683181 View in PubMed
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Romanian adoption. The Manitoba experience.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature210521
Source
Arch Pediatr Adolesc Med. 1996 Dec;150(12):1278-82
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1996
Author
T C Benoit
L J Jocelyn
D M Moddemann
J E Embree
Author Affiliation
Department of Pediatrics and Child Health, Children's Hospital, Health Sciences Centre, Winnipeg, Manitoba.
Source
Arch Pediatr Adolesc Med. 1996 Dec;150(12):1278-82
Date
Dec-1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adoption - psychology
Child Behavior Disorders - diagnosis - etiology
Developmental Disabilities - diagnosis - etiology
Female
Growth Disorders - diagnosis - etiology
Humans
Infant
Male
Manitoba
Prospective Studies
Romania - ethnology
Abstract
To study the developmental, behavioral, and medical features in a cohort of Romanian children adopted by Manitoba families.
A prospective longitudinal study.
The Child Development Clinic, Children's Hospital, Winnipeg, Manitoba, from September 1990 to June 1992.
Developmental, behavioral, and medical features were assessed in 22 Romanian children adopted by 18 Manitoba families.
Mean (+/- SD) age at adoption was 15.5 +/- 13 months. Mean (+/- SD) age at initial assessment was 19 +/- 12 months and at follow-up, 35 +/- 13 months. Medical complications included 6 children (27%) who were positive for the hepatitis B surface antigen, 5 with intestinal parasites (23%), 1 positive for the human immunodeficiency virus, 1 with rickets (5%), and 1 with monoplegia and cleft palate (5%). Initial growth parameters were less than the fifth percentile for age for head circumference in 10 children (45%), for weight in 8 (36%), and for height in 7 (32%). At follow-up, statistically significant improvement was seen in height and weight. Initial mean (+/- SD) developmental quotients were 82 +/- 20 for gross motor, 83 +/- 23 for fine motor, 83 +/- 19 for cognitive, and 79 +/- 18 for language domains. Follow-up mean developmental quotients improved in all domains (P
PubMed ID
8954000 View in PubMed
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Screening for intestinal parasites in adopted children from Romania--Quebec.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature223247
Source
Can Commun Dis Rep. 1992 Aug 28;18(16):122-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-28-1992
Author
J D MacLean
T W Gyorkos
E. Kokoskin-Nelson
Author Affiliation
McGill University Centre for Tropical Diseases, Montreal General Hospital, Quebec.
Source
Can Commun Dis Rep. 1992 Aug 28;18(16):122-4
Date
Aug-28-1992
Language
English
French
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adoption
Canada
Child
Developing Countries
Emigration and Immigration
Humans
Intestinal Diseases, Parasitic - prevention & control
Mass Screening
Romania - ethnology
PubMed ID
1290998 View in PubMed
Less detail

A three year follow-up of attachment and indiscriminate friendliness in children adopted from Romanian orphanages.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature204350
Source
Child Dev. 1998 Aug;69(4):1092-106
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-1998
Author
K. Chisholm
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychology, Saint Francis Xavier University, Antigonish, Nova Scotia. ckchisho@stfx.ca
Source
Child Dev. 1998 Aug;69(4):1092-106
Date
Aug-1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adoption - psychology
Anxiety, Separation
Canada
Child
Child Behavior Disorders - etiology - psychology
Child, Institutionalized - psychology
Child, Preschool
Epidemiologic Methods
Family Health
Female
Foster Home Care - psychology
Humans
Interpersonal Relations
Male
Object Attachment
Parent-Child Relations
Parents - psychology
Romania - ethnology
Social Adjustment
Stress, Psychological - etiology
Time Factors
Abstract
Attachment and indiscriminately friendly behavior were assessed in children who had spent at least 8 months in a Romanian orphanage (RO) and two comparison groups of children: a Canadian-born, nonadopted, never institutionalized comparison group (CB) and an early adopted comparison group adopted from Romania before the age of 4 months (EA). Attachment was assessed using 2 measures: an attachment security questionnaire based on parent report, and a Separation Reunion procedure that was coded using the Preschool Assessment of Attachment. Indiscriminately friendly behavior was examined using parents' responses to 5 questions about their children's behavior with new adults. Although RO children did not score differently from either CB or EA children on the attachment security measure based on parent report, they did display significantly more insecure attachment patterns than did children in the other 2 groups. In addition, RO children displayed significantly more indiscriminately friendly behavior than both CB and EA children, who did not differ in terms of indiscriminate friendliness. RO children's insecure attachment patterns were not associated with any aspect of their institutional environment, but were related to particular child and family characteristics. Specifically, insecure RO children had more behavior problems, scored lower on the Stanford-Binet Intelligence Scale, and had parents who reported significantly more parenting stress than RO children classified as secure.
PubMed ID
9768488 View in PubMed
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11 records – page 1 of 2.