Skip header and navigation

Refine By

196 records – page 1 of 20.

[2011 peaks the TBE incidence. The deer tribe variation in size and the weather are key factors].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature124516
Source
Lakartidningen. 2012 Feb 15-21;109(7):343-6
Publication Type
Article
Author
Thomas G T Jaenson
Marika Hjertqvist
Ake Lundkvist
Author Affiliation
Institutionen för organismbiologi, Uppsala universitet. thomas.jaenson@ebc.uu.se
Source
Lakartidningen. 2012 Feb 15-21;109(7):343-6
Language
Swedish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Climate
Deer - parasitology
Encephalitis, Tick-Borne - epidemiology - etiology
Humans
Incidence
Ixodes - growth & development - parasitology
Risk factors
Rodentia - parasitology
Sweden - epidemiology
PubMed ID
22574428 View in PubMed
Less detail

Active and passive surveillance and phylogenetic analysis of Borrelia burgdorferi elucidate the process of Lyme disease risk emergence in Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature143987
Source
Environ Health Perspect. 2010 Jul;118(7):909-14
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2010
Author
Nicholas H Ogden
Catherine Bouchard
Klaus Kurtenbach
Gabriele Margos
L Robbin Lindsay
Louise Trudel
Soulyvane Nguon
François Milord
Author Affiliation
Centre for Food-Borne, Environmental and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases, Public Health Agency of Canada, Saint-Hyacinthe, Québec, Canada. nicholas_ogden@phac-aspc.gc.ca
Source
Environ Health Perspect. 2010 Jul;118(7):909-14
Date
Jul-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Borrelia burgdorferi - classification - genetics
Cluster analysis
Communicable Diseases, Emerging - epidemiology - microbiology
Demography
Genetic Variation
Humans
Ixodes - microbiology
Logistic Models
Lyme Disease - epidemiology - microbiology
Phylogeny
Population Surveillance - methods
Quebec - epidemiology
Rodentia - parasitology
Sequence Analysis, DNA
Tick Infestations - epidemiology - veterinary
Abstract
Northward expansion of the tick Ixodes scapularis is driving Lyme disease (LD) emergence in Canada. Information on mechanisms involved is needed to enhance surveillance and identify where LD risk is emerging.
We used passive and active surveillance and phylogeographic analysis of Borrelia burgdorferi to investigate LD risk emergence in Quebec.
In active surveillance, we collected ticks from the environment and from captured rodents. B. burgdorferi transmission was detected by serological analysis of rodents and by polymerase chain reaction assays of ticks. Spatiotemporal trends in passive surveillance data assisted interpretation of active surveillance. Multilocus sequence typing (MLST) of B. burgdorferi in ticks identified likely source locations of B. burgdorferi.
In active surveillance, we found I. scapularis at 55% of sites, and we were more likely to find them at sites with a warmer climate. B. burgdorferi was identified at 13 I. scapularis-positive sites, but infection prevalence in ticks and animal hosts was low. Low infection prevalence in ticks submitted in passive surveillance after 2004-from the tick-positive regions identified in active surveillance-coincided with an exponential increase in tick submissions during this time. MLST analysis suggested recent introduction of B. burgdorferi from the northeastern United States.
These data are consistent with I. scapularis ticks dispersed from the United States by migratory birds, founding populations where the climate is warmest, and then establishment of B. burgdorferi from the United States several years after I. scapularis have established. These observations provide vital information for public health to minimize the impact of LD in Canada.
Notes
Cites: Am J Trop Med Hyg. 1988 Jul;39(1):105-93400797
Cites: Microbiology. 2004 Jun;150(Pt 6):1741-5515184561
Cites: Ann N Y Acad Sci. 1994 Dec 15;740:146-567840446
Cites: J Med Entomol. 1997 Jan;34(1):52-59086711
Cites: J Wildl Dis. 1997 Oct;33(4):766-759391960
Cites: Infect Immun. 1999 Jul;67(7):3518-2410377134
Cites: J Med Entomol. 2004 Sep;41(5):842-5215535611
Cites: Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2004 Dec 28;101(52):18159-6415608069
Cites: Int J Parasitol. 2005 Apr 1;35(4):375-8915777914
Cites: Int J Parasitol. 2006 Jan;36(1):63-7016229849
Cites: J Med Entomol. 2006 Mar;43(2):166-7616619595
Cites: J Med Entomol. 2006 May;43(3):600-916739422
Cites: J Clin Microbiol. 2006 Dec;44(12):4407-1317035489
Cites: Stat Med. 2007 Mar 30;26(7):1594-60716795130
Cites: Appl Environ Microbiol. 2008 Mar;74(6):1780-9018245258
Cites: Int J Health Geogr. 2008;7:2418498647
Cites: Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2008 Jun 24;105(25):8730-518574151
Cites: CMAJ. 2009 Jun 9;180(12):1221-419506281
Cites: Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2009 Sep 1;106(35):15013-819706476
Cites: CMAJ. 1991 Jun 15;144(12):1627-322054769
Cites: Emerg Infect Dis. 2002 Feb;8(2):115-2111897061
Comment In: Environ Health Perspect. 2010 Jul;118(7):A30520601318
PubMed ID
20421192 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Adrenergic regulation of thermogenesis in Siberian lemmings]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature13061
Source
Fiziol Zh SSSR Im I M Sechenova. 1979 Sep;65(9):1340-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1979
Author
Iu F Pastukhov
E G Belogubova
R P Valov
Source
Fiziol Zh SSSR Im I M Sechenova. 1979 Sep;65(9):1340-5
Date
Sep-1979
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Body Temperature - drug effects
Body Temperature Regulation - drug effects
Caffeine - pharmacology
Drug Interactions
English Abstract
Isoproterenol - pharmacology
Norepinephrine - pharmacology
Oxygen Consumption - drug effects
Propranolol - pharmacology
Receptors, Adrenergic, beta - drug effects - physiology
Rodentia - physiology
Sympathetic Nervous System - physiology
Abstract
Siberian lemmings seem to have lesser noradrenaline (NA) calorigenic action and higher beta-adrenergic "asymmetry" of catecholamine calorigenic effects than the cold- and warmth-adapted laboratory rodents. Selective inhibition of catecholamine effects by beta-adrenoblocking drug propranolol, obvious potentiation of NA effect by caffeine, and compensatory increasing of thermoregulatory musclar contractile activity during the blockade of betaadrenoreceptors under cooling suggest the domineering of betaadrenergic mechanisms of thermogenesis in siberian lemmings and their high thermoregulatory lability.
PubMed ID
226423 View in PubMed
Less detail

The alternative prey hypothesis revisited: Still valid for willow ptarmigan population dynamics.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature296187
Source
PLoS One. 2018; 13(6):e0197289
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
2018
Author
Jo Inge Breisjøberget
Morten Odden
Per Wegge
Barbara Zimmermann
Harry Andreassen
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Applied Ecology and Agricultural Sciences, Inland Norway University of Applied Sciences, Campus Evenstad, Koppang, Norway.
Source
PLoS One. 2018; 13(6):e0197289
Date
2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Animals
Betula - growth & development
Climate change
Food chain
Foxes - physiology
Models, Biological
Norway
Population Dynamics
Rodentia - physiology
Salix - growth & development
Abstract
The alternative prey hypothesis predicts that the interaction between generalist predators and their main prey is a major driver of population dynamics of alternative prey species. In Fennoscandia, changes in climate and human land use are assumed to alter the dynamics of cyclic small rodents (main prey) and lead to increased densities and range expansion of an important generalist predator, the red fox Vulpes vulpes. In order to better understand the role of these potential changes in community structure on an alternative prey species, willow ptarmigan Lagopus lagopus, we analyzed nine years of population census data from SE Norway to investigate how community interactions affected their population dynamics. The ptarmigan populations showed no declining trend during the study period, and annual variations corresponded with marked periodic small rodent peaks and declines. Population growth and breeding success were highly correlated, and both demographic variables were influenced by an interaction between red fox and small rodents. Red foxes affected ptarmigan negatively only when small rodent abundance was low, which is in accordance with the alternative prey hypothesis. Our results confirm the important role of red fox predation in ptarmigan dynamics, and indicate that if small rodent cycles are disrupted, this may lead to decline in ptarmigan and other alternative prey species due to elevated predation pressure.
Notes
Cites: Oecologia. 2002 Jul;132(2):213-220 PMID 28547354
Cites: Oecologia. 1985 Oct;67(3):394-402 PMID 28311574
Cites: Nature. 2003 Jan 2;421(6918):37-42 PMID 12511946
Cites: Science. 2009 Sep 11;325(5946):1355-8 PMID 19745143
Cites: Pest Manag Sci. 2014 Dec;70(12):1769-79 PMID 25256611
Cites: Anim Behav. 1998 Nov;56(5):1137-1144 PMID 9819329
Cites: Oecologia. 1978 Jan;32(2):141-152 PMID 28309394
Cites: Proc Biol Sci. 2002 May 22;269(1495):991-7 PMID 12028754
Cites: Nature. 2008 Nov 6;456(7218):93-7 PMID 18987742
Cites: Proc Biol Sci. 2017 Nov 15;284(1866):null PMID 29118133
Cites: Ecol Evol. 2016 Dec 14;7(1):115-124 PMID 28070280
Cites: Ecol Lett. 2007 Mar;10(3):197-206 PMID 17305803
Cites: J Anim Ecol. 2011 Sep;80(5):1049-60 PMID 21477201
Cites: Ambio. 2015 Jan;44 Suppl 1:S39-50 PMID 25576279
Cites: Proc Biol Sci. 2005 Oct 7;272(1576):2045-9 PMID 16191615
Cites: Oecologia. 1984 May;62(2):199-208 PMID 28310714
Cites: J Anim Ecol. 2009 May;78(3):636-45 PMID 19040680
Cites: Oecologia. 1990 Apr;82(4):527-530 PMID 28311478
Cites: PLoS One. 2017 Apr 6;12 (4):e0175291 PMID 28384313
Cites: J Anim Ecol. 2011 Jan;80(1):244-58 PMID 21054381
Cites: J Anim Ecol. 2006 Jan;75(1):156-66 PMID 16903053
PubMed ID
29874270 View in PubMed
Less detail

Alveolar hydatid disease. Review of the surgical experience in 42 cases of active disease among Alaskan Eskimos.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature4087
Source
Ann Surg. 1995 Mar;221(3):315-23
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-1995
Author
J F Wilson
R L Rausch
F R Wilson
Author Affiliation
Department of Surgery, Alaska Native Medical Center, Anchorage, USA.
Source
Ann Surg. 1995 Mar;221(3):315-23
Date
Mar-1995
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Alaska - epidemiology
Animals
Child
Dogs
Echinococcosis, Pulmonary - drug therapy - epidemiology - surgery
Foxes
Humans
Inuits
Middle Aged
Pulmonary Alveoli
Rodentia
United States - epidemiology
Zoonoses
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: The authors reviewed the pathophysiology and clinical management of endemic alveolar hydatid disease in Alaskan Eskimos, incorporating recent developments in diagnosis and treatment. SUMMARY BACKGROUND DATA: Alveolar hydatid disease is a highly lethal zoonotic infection caused by the larval stage of Echinococcus multilocularis. This cestode is restricted geographically to northern climates, where foxes and small rodents represent the natural hosts. Domestic dogs also may serve as definitive hosts, and thus, transmit the parasite to humans. Human infection is characterized by the development of a cancer-like hepatic mass, which may extend to adjacent structures or metastasize to distant sites. If the infection goes untreated, mortality reaches 80%. METHODS: The medical records of all patients with alveolar hydatid disease diagnosed or treated at the Alaska Native Medical Center between 1951 and 1993 were reviewed. Forty-two cases of active disease are presented. RESULTS: Nine patients underwent resection of hepatic lesions with intent to cure, and each had a favorable result. Average post-diagnosis survival of those patients was 22 years; six still are living and free of disease. Partial resections or drainage procedures were performed in ten patients. Chemotherapy was used to augment the surgical treatment of eight patients, and four received chemotherapy alone, resulting in improved outcomes compared with historic controls. Late complications included hepatic abscess, biliary obstruction, and portal venous hypertension. CONCLUSIONS: Whereas alveolar hydatid disease rarely is encountered in other areas of North America, the biologic potential for spread of the disease may be increasing because of illegal importation of infected foxes to the Eastern seaboard. Therefore, the surgical community should maintain an awareness of the diagnosis and management of this potentially devastating parasitic infection.
PubMed ID
7717785 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Analysis of Microsatellite DNA in Rodents from Eastern Urals Radioactive Trace Zone and Contiguous Territories].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature276499
Source
Genetika. 2016 Apr;52(4):453-60
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2016
Author
S B Rakitin
E B Grigorkina
G V Olenev
Source
Genetika. 2016 Apr;52(4):453-60
Date
Apr-2016
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Physiological - genetics - radiation effects
Animals
Bone and Bones - radiation effects
DNA - genetics - radiation effects
Microsatellite Repeats - genetics - radiation effects
Radioactive Hazard Release
Rodentia - genetics
Russia
Strontium Radioisotopes - chemistry - isolation & purification
Abstract
The variability of four microsatellite loci of rodents, caught from the head part of Eastern Urals Radioactive Trace (EURT), along with the rodents inhabiting contiguous zone with background radiation level and distant-reference territory, was analyzed forthe first time. Differences in the parameters of genetic diversity between northern red-backed voles from the EURT zone and from the reference population were detected. An increase in some indices of genetic diversity in animals from a contiguous to the EURT zone was found; this is probably associated with animal migration and configuration of the area of pollution. A transfer of radiation-induced effects to the contiguous territories and a decrease in the possibility of fixation of adaptations in a series of generations of mobile rodent species in the area of local radioactive pollution are consequences of migrations. The results of the study make it possible to recommend microsatellite markers for the analysis of radiation-induced effects in rodents as model objects of radioecological monitoring.
PubMed ID
27529979 View in PubMed
Less detail

An emerging zoonosis in Scandinavia -- nephropathia epidemica.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature249659
Source
Nord Vet Med. 1977 Sep;29(9):406-12
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1977
Author
J. Lähdevirta
H. Korpela
Source
Nord Vet Med. 1977 Sep;29(9):406-12
Date
Sep-1977
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Animals
Animals, Domestic
Disease Reservoirs
Female
Hantavirus
Hemorrhagic Fever with Renal Syndrome - epidemiology - etiology - transmission
Humans
Male
Rodentia
Scandinavia
Zoonoses
Abstract
The paper reviews as zoonosis the disease called Nephropathia epidemica in north European countries. The etiology is as yet unsolved but a viral one is highly suspected with small rodents (voles and mice) as the source of infection. Based on the epidemiological peculiarities of the disease, the ecology of the agent and hypothetical ways of transmission of infection from small rodents to man are discussed.
PubMed ID
20600 View in PubMed
Less detail

[An epidemiological analysis of hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome morbidity in the Republic of Bashkortostan in 1997].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature198044
Source
Zh Mikrobiol Epidemiol Immunobiol. 1999 Nov-Dec;(6):45-9
Publication Type
Article
Author
R G Nurgaleeva
E A Tkachenko
A G Stepanenko
I M Mustafin
S G Kireev
T K Dzagurova
A E Dekonenko
L A Klimchuk
G D Minin
Author Affiliation
Bashkir Republican Center of State Sanitary and Epidemiological Surveillance, Ufa, Russia.
Source
Zh Mikrobiol Epidemiol Immunobiol. 1999 Nov-Dec;(6):45-9
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Distribution
Animals
Bashkiria - epidemiology
Child
Disease Outbreaks - statistics & numerical data
Disease Reservoirs - statistics & numerical data - veterinary
Disease Vectors
Female
Hemorrhagic Fever with Renal Syndrome - epidemiology - immunology - transmission
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Rodentia
Rural Population - statistics & numerical data
Seasons
Seroepidemiologic Studies
Sex Distribution
Urban Population - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
The outbreak of hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome (HFRS) in the Republic of Bashkortostan, resulting in 10,057 registered cases of the disease (287 cases per 100,000 of the population), was analyzed. HFRS cases among the population were registered in 52 out of 54 regions of Bashkortostan. 31% of the total number of patients were the inhabitants of rural regions (170 cases per 100,000) and 69% were urban dwellers (295 cases per 100,000), mainly in Ufa (512 cases per 100,000). HFRS morbidity among males was fourfold higher than among females. In 70% of cases persons aged 20-49 years were affected. 5% of the total number of patients were children aged up to 14 years. In 34 cases (0.4%) the severe clinical course of the disease had a fatal outcome. Cases of HFRS were registered from April 1997 till March 1998 with the highest morbidity rate observed during the period of August-December. In most cases (46.8%) both urban and rural dwellers contacted infection during a short-term stay in the forest. As the result of the serological examination of the patients, all HFRS cases were etiologically attributed to hantavirus, serotype Puumala. The main natural reservoir of this virus and the source of human infection in Bashkortostan were bank voles (Clethrionomys glareolus), the domination species among small mammals in this region.
PubMed ID
10876849 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Anthropurgic foci of pseudotuberculosis and the mechanisms of their formation in groups of servicemen].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature168924
Source
Zh Mikrobiol Epidemiol Immunobiol. 2006 Mar-Apr;(2):11-7
Publication Type
Article
Author
M V Makhnev
Source
Zh Mikrobiol Epidemiol Immunobiol. 2006 Mar-Apr;(2):11-7
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Disease Reservoirs - microbiology
Environmental Microbiology
Environmental monitoring
Epidemiological Monitoring
Humans
Military Personnel
Rodentia - microbiology
Russia - epidemiology
Vegetables - microbiology
Yersinia pseudotuberculosis - isolation & purification
Yersinia pseudotuberculosis Infections - epidemiology
Abstract
At the period of 1982 - 2003, morbidity rate in pseudotuberculosis and the Yersinia pseudotuberculosis culture rates in groups of servicemen (from different abiotic objects, from humans and small rodents) in different geographic zones were studied. The cases of the isolation of Y. pseudotuberculosis were most frequently registered in groups of servicemen in the Far East and the Kola Peninsula. In these regions the highest morbidity rate in pseudotuberculosis was registered among servicemen. The contamination rate of vegetables during the year was always greater than in other objects under study, including small rodents. The study demonstrated that in the Armed Forces could appear, temporary and relatively constant anthropurgic foci of pseudotuberculosis even in non endemic regions. They were formed in the objects of the food supply service due to the supply of contaminated vegetables. Synanthropic rodents played a secondary role, though they too facilitated the formation of new anthropurgic foci. Under definite conditions anthropurgic foci could exist autonomously, independently of natural foci.
PubMed ID
16758891 View in PubMed
Less detail

196 records – page 1 of 20.