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59 records – page 1 of 6.

The 1993 Fraser N. Gurd Lecture: The view from the edge.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature217361
Source
J Trauma. 1994 Sep;37(3):379-86
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1994
Author
G W Fitzgerald
Author Affiliation
Department of Surgery, Charles S. Curtis Memorial Hospital, St. Anthony, Newfoundland, Canada.
Source
J Trauma. 1994 Sep;37(3):379-86
Date
Sep-1994
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Delivery of Health Care
Humans
Injury Severity Score
Off-Road Motor Vehicles
Rural Population
Trauma Centers - statistics & numerical data
PubMed ID
8083897 View in PubMed
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Accidents in the north. Some aspects on snowmobile accidents and moose-car collisions.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature11946
Source
Arctic Med Res. 1992;51 Suppl 7:56-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
1992
Author
U. Björnstig
Author Affiliation
Department of Surgery, University of Umeå, Sweden.
Source
Arctic Med Res. 1992;51 Suppl 7:56-8
Date
1992
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidents, Traffic - statistics & numerical data
Animals
Deer
Humans
Off-Road Motor Vehicles
Sweden - epidemiology
Wounds and Injuries - epidemiology - etiology
Abstract
Snowmobile accidents and moose-car crashes are typical accidents in Northern Sweden. In this region there is about 1 snowmobile/10 inhabitants. The present paper combines previously published studies. The studies on snowmobile accidents are based on a material comprising all 61 fatally injured snowmobile drivers from the four northern counties of Sweden during the period 1973-1987. The helmet usage was analyzed in two clinical study populations including 200 injured from the county of Västerbotten from two periods 1979-1980 and 1985-86. Of the fatally injured (median age 32 years) 86% were driving under the influence of alcohol with a mean blood alcohol concentration of 0.17 g/ml. Serious head injuries were uncommon among persons driving without a helmet in the clinical material. Only in about 6% of the cases an open face helmet would probably have had an injury reducing effect. Drunken driving is an important etiological factor for fatal snowmobile accidents. Preventive measures must include information that the Traffic Temperance Law also applies to snowmobile riding. A helmet law for snowmobile riders does not seem to be motivated from the injury reduction point of view. According to official Swedish police statistics more than 400 car occupants are injured annually in crashes with a moose. The crash mechanism is special. Because of its long legs the body of the moose hits directly against the windshield, windshield pillars and front roof. During a period of three years 154 injured passenger car occupants were treated in the hospitals in Umeå and Skellefteå. Of both the front and rear seat occupants 80% suffered laceration injuries from glass or glass splinters.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)
PubMed ID
1285819 View in PubMed
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Alcohol and drug use among motor vehicle collision victims admitted to a regional trauma unit: demographic, injury, and crash characteristics.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature220578
Source
Accid Anal Prev. 1993 Aug;25(4):411-20
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-1993
Author
G. Stoduto
E. Vingilis
B M Kapur
W J Sheu
B A McLellan
C B Liban
Author Affiliation
Prevention and Health Promotion Research and Development, Addiction Research Foundation, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
Source
Accid Anal Prev. 1993 Aug;25(4):411-20
Date
Aug-1993
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidents - statistics & numerical data
Accidents, Traffic - statistics & numerical data
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Alcohol Drinking - blood - epidemiology
Automobile Driving - statistics & numerical data
Demography
Ethanol - blood
Female
Humans
Incidence
Male
Middle Aged
Off-Road Motor Vehicles
Ontario - epidemiology
Prospective Studies
Substance-Related Disorders - epidemiology
Trauma Centers
Trauma Severity Indices
Abstract
This study examined the incidence of alcohol and drugs in a sample of seriously injured motor vehicle collision victims, and differences related to pre-crash use of alcohol and/or other drugs on demographic variables, injury severity measures, and crash variables. The sample selected were all motor vehicle collision admissions to the Regional Trauma Unit at the Sunnybrook Health Science Centre in Toronto, Ontario, over a 37-month period (N = 854). Prospective demographic and injury-related information were collected from hospital charts, and crash data were collected from motor vehicle collision police reports. Blood samples were routinely collected on admission and tested for blood alcohol concentration (BAC). We found 32.0% of the BAC-tested motor vehicle collision admissions and 35.5% of drivers tested positive for blood alcohol. The drivers' mean BAC on admission was found to be 145.2 mg/100 ml, and the mean estimated BAC at crash time was 181 mg/100 ml. Drug screens were performed on a two-year subsample (n = 474), of whom 339 were drivers. Drug screens revealed that 41.3% of drivers tested positive for other drugs in body fluids, and 16.5% were positive for alcohol in combination with other drugs. Other than alcohol, the drugs most frequently detected in the drivers were cannabinoids (13.9%), benzodiazepines (12.4%), and cocaine (5.3%). Investigation of differences on demographic, injury, and crash characteristics related to precrash use of alcohol and/or drugs yielded significant findings. In the drug screened sample we found sex, admission type, and occupant status were related to precrash alcohol use. Also, use of drugs was found to interact with admission type and mean BAC on admission. Elapsed time was found to be significantly different for BAC by other drug use, with a greater length of elapsed time found for the subjects testing other drug positive but BAC negative. We found that BAC-positive drug-screened drivers were significantly more likely to be male, involved in a single-vehicle collision, not wearing a seat belt, ejected from the vehicle, and travelling at higher speeds than BAC negative drivers. No significant differences were found between BAC and/or other drug use on injury severity measures.
PubMed ID
8357454 View in PubMed
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Alcohol involvement in snowmobile operator fatalities in Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature192579
Source
Can J Public Health. 2001 Sep-Oct;92(5):359-60
Publication Type
Article
Author
D J Beirness
Author Affiliation
Taffic Injury Research Foundation of Canada, 171 Nepean Street, Suite 200, Ottawa, ON K2P 0B4. dougb@trafficinjuryresearch.com
Source
Can J Public Health. 2001 Sep-Oct;92(5):359-60
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidents - mortality
Adolescent
Adult
Alcoholic Intoxication - mortality - prevention & control
Canada - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Odds Ratio
Off-Road Motor Vehicles - statistics & numerical data
Risk factors
PubMed ID
11702489 View in PubMed
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All-terrain vehicle major injury patterns in children: a five-year review in Southwestern Ontario.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature164966
Source
CJEM. 2006 Jul;8(4):277-80
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2006
Author
Khalid Alawi
Tim Lynch
Rod Lim
Author Affiliation
Children's Hospital of Western Ontario, University of Western Ontario, London.
Source
CJEM. 2006 Jul;8(4):277-80
Date
Jul-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidents - statistics & numerical data
Adolescent
Child
Emergency Service, Hospital - utilization
Female
Humans
Length of Stay - statistics & numerical data
Male
Off-Road Motor Vehicles - statistics & numerical data
Ontario - epidemiology
Registries
Retrospective Studies
Wounds and Injuries - epidemiology
Abstract
The aim of the study was to characterize the nature of the injuries sustained by children involved in all-terrain vehicle (ATV) crashes in Southwestern Ontario over a 5-year period.
A retrospective chart review was conducted of children who sustained ATV-related trauma and who presented to the emergency department at the Children's Hospital of Western Ontario between Sept. 1, 1998, and Aug. 31, 2003, with an Injury Severity Score (ISS) = 12. Patients were identified by the London Health Sciences Centre Trauma Program Registry. Patient charts were then retrieved and reviewed to record patient demographics, injuries, interventions and length of stay in hospital.
Seventeen patients, 14 male and 3 female, met inclusion criteria. Ages ranged from 8-17 years, with an average age of 13.7 years. Thirteen were
PubMed ID
17324309 View in PubMed
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All terrain vehicle ownership, use, and self reported safety behaviours in rural children.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature205637
Source
Inj Prev. 1998 Mar;4(1):44-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-1998
Author
L. Warda
T P Klassen
N. Buchan
A. Zierler
Author Affiliation
Pediatric Emergency Medicine, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Canada.
Source
Inj Prev. 1998 Mar;4(1):44-9
Date
Mar-1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Behavior
Child
Female
Head Protective Devices
Humans
Male
Manitoba
Off-Road Motor Vehicles - statistics & numerical data
Protective Clothing
Rural Population
Safety
Abstract
To describe all terrain vehicle (ATV) ownership, access, use, and safety behaviours in rural Manitoba children.
Questionnaire administered to a convenience sample of grade 6 students attending an agricultural fair.
162 grade 6 children participated. The mean age was 11.4 years, and 46% were male. 125 students (77%) reported having access to ATVs, including 69 four wheeled, 24 three wheeled, and four both three and four wheeled ATVs. ATV experience was reported in 95 students, significantly more often in males and among those with a family owned ATV, with no difference between children living on a farm and in a town. Use of helmets and protective clothing was inadequate (10-40%), and dangerous riding habits common, with males and children living on a farm reporting significantly fewer desirable behaviours.
ATVs are commonly used by children in rural Manitoba, with inadequate protective gear and dangerous riding habits. Mandatory rider training, consumer and dealer education, and legislation enforcement could improve ATV safety in this population.
Notes
Cites: Ann Emerg Med. 1986 Nov;15(11):1293-63777585
Cites: Inj Prev. 1995 Dec;1(4):249-559346041
Cites: Am J Forensic Med Pathol. 1987 Sep;8(3):225-83673983
Cites: Tex Med. 1987 Dec;83(12):27-303424238
Cites: Ann Emerg Med. 1988 Jan;17(1):30-33337411
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Cites: J Bone Joint Surg Am. 1988 Feb;70(2):275-843343274
Cites: J Trauma. 1988 Mar;28(3):391-43351996
Cites: Am Surg. 1988 Jul;54(7):429-333389591
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Cites: Am J Emerg Med. 1991 Mar;9(2):149-521994943
Cites: West J Med. 1987 Apr;146(4):497-83577150
PubMed ID
9595331 View in PubMed
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An assessment of potential injury surveillance data sources in Alaska using an emerging problem: all-terrain vehicle-associated injuries.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature6295
Source
Public Health Rep. 1989 Sep-Oct;104(5):493-8
Publication Type
Article
Author
S M Smith
J P Middaugh
Author Affiliation
Division of Injury Epidemiology and Control, Centers for Disease Control, Atlanta, GA 30333.
Source
Public Health Rep. 1989 Sep-Oct;104(5):493-8
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alaska - epidemiology
Coroners and Medical Examiners
Data Collection - economics - methods
Death Certificates
Government Agencies
Humans
Information Systems - utilization
Off-Road Motor Vehicles
Wounds and Injuries - epidemiology - etiology - mortality
Abstract
Using injuries associated with three-wheeled all-terrain vehicles in Alaska as an example, the existing injury data bases were assessed for usefulness, cost, simplicity, acceptability, flexibility, sensitivity, specificity, representativeness, and timeliness. In this study strengths and weaknesses of existing data for all-terrain vehicles were identified and ways to improve data collection and linkages across data systems are suggested. Based on this evaluation, linked death certificates and medical examiner data provide an excellent mechanism for monitoring vehicle-related fatalities. Information sources for nonfatal and nonvehicle-related injuries require further development. Police records provide supplemental information, but they are limited to the events reported to police. Although other sources were explored, they added no advantage to the primary sources. Data processing, analysis, and dissemination--traditional responsibilities for public health and other governmental agencies--can transform these data sources into meaningful mechanisms to define injury trends and monitor injury-specific intervention strategies.
PubMed ID
2508179 View in PubMed
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[Anatomic trauma scoring following accidents].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature170721
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2006 Feb 9;126(4):479; author reply 479
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-9-2006
Author
Kjetil Søreide
Andreas Krüger
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2006 Feb 9;126(4):479; author reply 479
Date
Feb-9-2006
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Abbreviated Injury Scale
Accidents
Humans
Injury Severity Score
Norway
Off-Road Motor Vehicles
Wounds and Injuries - diagnosis - etiology
Notes
Comment On: Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2005 Dec 1;125(23):3252-516327847
Comment On: Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2005 Dec 1;125(23):3248-5116327846
PubMed ID
16477292 View in PubMed
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The association of alcohol and night driving with fatal snowmobile trauma: a case-control study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature216945
Source
Ann Emerg Med. 1994 Nov;24(5):842-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-1994
Author
B. Rowe
R. Milner
C. Johnson
G. Bota
Author Affiliation
Department of Research, Northeastern Ontario Family Medicine, Laurentian University, Canada.
Source
Ann Emerg Med. 1994 Nov;24(5):842-8
Date
Nov-1994
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accident prevention
Accidents - mortality
Accidents, Traffic - mortality
Adult
Alcohol Drinking - adverse effects - blood - epidemiology - prevention & control
Case-Control Studies
Cause of Death
Confidence Intervals
Female
Humans
Male
Matched-Pair Analysis
Motorcycles
Odds Ratio
Off-Road Motor Vehicles
Ontario - epidemiology
Population Surveillance
Risk factors
Time Factors
Abstract
To investigate the association of alcohol use and night driving with traumatic snowmobile fatalities.
Case-control study.
Traumatic deaths occurring while driving a snowmobile during the years 1985 to 1990 were reviewed. A sample of 1989 to 1990 fatal motor vehicle driver and motorcycle driver accidents were used as controls. Records were obtained from the provincial coroner.
One hundred eight snowmobile fatalities, 432 motor vehicle fatalities, and 108 motorcycle fatalities were included. Young men (mean age, 30 years) made up the snowmobile fatalities population, with weekend fatalities predominating (67%). Snowmobile fatalities were associated with use during times of suboptimal lighting (crude odds ratio, 1.9 [95% confidence interval, 1.1-3.3]; P
Notes
Comment In: Ann Emerg Med. 1995 May;25(5):717-87741357
PubMed ID
7978556 View in PubMed
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ATVs: motorized toys or vehicles for children?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature170809
Source
Inj Prev. 2006 Feb;12(1):30-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2006
Author
N L Yanchar
R. Kennedy
C. Russell
Author Affiliation
Division of Pediatric General Surgery, IWK Health Centre, Halifax, Canada. yanchar@iwk.nshealth.ca
Source
Inj Prev. 2006 Feb;12(1):30-4
Date
Feb-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accidents - statistics & numerical data
Adolescent
Age Factors
Bicycling - injuries
Canada - epidemiology
Child
Child, Preschool
Humans
Length of Stay
Off-Road Motor Vehicles - statistics & numerical data
Wounds and Injuries - epidemiology - etiology - therapy
Abstract
To compare the nature of injuries from all-terrain vehicles (ATVs) to those from bicycling, dirtbikes/motocross, and motor vehicle crashes.
Data on injuries from the mechanisms outlined above were obtained through CHIRPP (the Canadian Hospitals Injury Reporting and Prevention Program) and hospital records.
A Canadian tertiary pediatric center.
Cases presenting to the emergency department over a 10 year period.
Comparison between demographics, mechanisms and natures of injuries sustained, disposition from the emergency department, and lengths of hospital stay.
Contrary to bicycling, ATV related injuries occurred among older ages and appeared to result less often from loss of control. Severe injuries resulting in deep soft tissue trauma and fracture/dislocations were 1.7 and 1.5 times, respectively, more frequent among ATV trauma than bicycling (p
Notes
Cites: Pediatrics. 2000 Jun;105(6):1352-410835081
Cites: J Pediatr Surg. 2002 Mar;37(3):375-8011877651
Cites: J Trauma. 2004 Jun;56(6):1185-9015211123
Cites: Inj Prev. 2004 Oct;10(5):303-715470012
Cites: Inj Prev. 1999 Sep;5(3):214-610518270
Cites: J Pediatr Surg. 1998 Feb;33(2):329-329498411
Cites: Can J Public Health. 1998 Jan-Feb;89(1):53-69524392
Cites: Inj Prev. 1999 Sep;5(3):208-1310518269
Cites: Am J Emerg Med. 1991 Mar;9(2):149-521994943
PubMed ID
16461417 View in PubMed
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59 records – page 1 of 6.