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[90Sr in residents of the Iset riverside settlements].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature144798
Source
Radiats Biol Radioecol. 2010 Jan-Feb;50(1):90-7
Publication Type
Article
Author
E I Tolstykh
L M Peremyslova
N B Shagina
M O Degteva
Source
Radiats Biol Radioecol. 2010 Jan-Feb;50(1):90-7
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Bone and Bones - chemistry
Humans
Radiation monitoring
Radioactive Hazard Release
Retrospective Studies
Rivers - chemistry
Rural Population
Siberia
Strontium Radioisotopes - analysis
Water Pollutants, Radioactive - analysis
Abstract
The river Iset belongs to the Techa-Iset-Tobol-Irtysh-Ob system contaminated by liquid radioactive wastes from Mayak plutonium facility in 1949-1956. This study represents the first retrospective analysis of postmortem measurements of 90Sr in bones from residents of the Iset riverside settlements in 1960-1982. It was shown that 90Sr concentration in bones of residents lived in settlements located downstream from the Techa river mouth (Shadrinsk, Isetskoye, Yalutorovsk) was 5 times higher than average 90Sr concentration in bones of the Russian residents. There was not statistically significant difference in accumulated 90Sr in bones between residents of the considered Iset' settlements indicating similar levels of 90Sr ingestion. Dietary 90Sr intake was reconstructed from the measurements of the radionuclide in bones. Total 90Sr dietary intake in 1950-1975 was 68 kBq; and 90% of the intake occurred in 1950-1961. In 1960s, 90Sr-contamination of the diet in settlements located downstream from the Techa river mouth was mostly (by 70%) due to global fallouts. Absorbed dose in the red bone marrow cumulated over 25 years of exposure was equal to 14 (4.7-42) mGy.
PubMed ID
20297686 View in PubMed
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[Accumulation of radionuclides in food chains of the Yenisei River after the nuclear power plant shutdown at the mining-and-chemical enterprise].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature261756
Source
Radiats Biol Radioecol. 2014 Jul-Aug;54(4):405-14
Publication Type
Article
Author
T A Zotina
E A Trofimova
A D Karpov
A Ia Bolsunovskii
Source
Radiats Biol Radioecol. 2014 Jul-Aug;54(4):405-14
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Biota
Chemical Industry
Fishes - metabolism
Food chain
Industrial Waste - analysis
Mining
Muscle, Skeletal - radionuclide imaging
Nuclear Power Plants
Radiation Monitoring - methods
Radioisotopes - analysis - pharmacokinetics
Rivers - chemistry
Seasons
Siberia
Water Pollutants, Radioactive - analysis - pharmacokinetics
Abstract
Accumulation of artificial and natural radionuclides in the chains of food webs leading to non-predatory and piscivorous fish of the Yenisei River was investigated during one year before and three years after the shutdown of a nuclear power plant at the Mining-and-Chemical Combine (2009-2012). The activity of artificial radionuclides in the samples of biota ofthe Yenisei River (aquatic moss, gammarids, dace, grayling, pike) was estimated. The concentration of radionuclides with induced activity (51Cr, 54Mn, 58Co, 60Co, 65Zn, 141, 144Ce, 152, 154Eu, 239Np) decreased in the biomass of biota after the shutdown of the nuclear power plant; the concentration of 137Cs did not. Analysis of the accumulation factors (C(F)) allows us to expect the effective accumulation of 137Cs in the terminal level of the food web of the Yenisei River--pike (C(F) = 2.0-9.4), i.e. biomagnifications of radiocesium. Accumulation of artificial, radionuclides in non-predatory fish from gammarids was not effective (C(F)
PubMed ID
25775829 View in PubMed
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Anaerobic reductive dechlorination of 1,2,3,4-tetrachlorodibenzofuran in polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxin- and dibenzofuran-contaminated sediments of the Kymijoki River, Finland.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature258016
Source
Chemosphere. 2014 Mar;98:58-65
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2014
Author
S. Kuokka
A-L Rantalainen
M M Häggblom
Author Affiliation
University of Helsinki, Dept. of Environmental Sciences, Lahti, Finland. Electronic address: sanna.kuokka@helsinki.fi.
Source
Chemosphere. 2014 Mar;98:58-65
Date
Mar-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Anaerobiosis
Benzofurans - analysis - chemistry - metabolism
Biodegradation, Environmental
Finland
Geologic Sediments - chemistry - microbiology
Humans
Rivers - chemistry - microbiology
Tetrachlorodibenzodioxin - analogs & derivatives - analysis - chemistry - metabolism
Abstract
Sediments of the Kymijoki River are highly contaminated with polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins and dibenzofurans (PCDD/Fs). These persistent PCDD/Fs resist biotic degradation and therefore the potential for microbial reductive dechlorination was assessed to determine how microbes impact the fate of these compounds. Anaerobic sediment microcosms of five different sites in the river were spiked with 1,2,3,4-tetrachlorodibenzofuran (1,2,3,4-TeCDF) as a model compound to determine the dechlorination potential in the sediments. Dechlorinating bacteria were active in all the study sites of the river. The extent of dechlorination over 10 and 29 months corresponded to the levels of aged PCDD/Fs, with sediments of the most contaminated site at Kuusankoski being the most active for reductive dechlorination. The dechlorination activity and levels of aged PCDD/Fs were correlated within the sediment cores at the all sites. The pathway of 1,2,3,4-TeCDF dechlorination was mainly via 1,3,4-trichlorodibenzofuran (TrCDF) to 1,3-dichlorodibenzofuran (DiCDF). Dechlorination via 1,2,4-TrCDF to further dechlorination products was also detected. Lateral reductive dechlorination would decrease the toxicity of 2,3,7,8-substituted PCDD/Fs. Our data suggest that sediments of the Kymijoki River contain indigenous microorganisms that are responsible for dechlorination of PCDD/Fs, especially at the most contaminated site.
PubMed ID
24210554 View in PubMed
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An assessment of metal-humus complexes in river waters of the Upper Amur basin, Russia.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature290663
Source
Environ Monit Assess. 2017 Dec 13; 190(1):18
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Dec-13-2017
Author
Svetlana Levshina
Author Affiliation
Institute of Water and Ecology Problems, Far Eastern Branch, Russian Academy of Sciences, 65, Kim Yu Chen Street, Khabarovsk, Russia, 680000. levshina@ivep.as.khb.ru.
Source
Environ Monit Assess. 2017 Dec 13; 190(1):18
Date
Dec-13-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Coordination Complexes - analysis
Ecology
Environmental Monitoring - methods
Humic Substances - analysis
Metals, Heavy - analysis
Rivers - chemistry
Russia
Water Pollutants, Chemical - analysis
Abstract
The dissolved metal concentrations have been assessed for Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, Mn, Ni, V, Zn, Ca, Mg, and Cd, and their complex compounds with humic substances (Me-HS complexes) in river waters of the Upper Amur basin using the inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry technique. The study shows an increase in the amount of Me-HS complexes from the southwestern steppe and forest-steppe to the northeastern mountainous taiga areas. In alkali waters of the steppe and forest-steppe areas with low concentrations of HS, the amount of Zn-HS complexes increases considerably. The observed general regularity in the distribution of metals is as follows: Fe > Cu = Zn > Cr > V > Ni > ?o = Mn > Ca > Mg > Cd. In acidic and neutral waters of the taiga rivers containing high concentrations of HS, 50% of metals are complexed with HS. Metals are arranged in the following order: Fe > Cu > Ni > Cr > V > Zn > ?o > Mn > Ca > Mg > Cd. Quantitative characteristics and a correlation matrix show that Me-HS complexes are dominant among toxic metals (Ni, Cu, Zn, Cr, Fe, and V) and account for 40-55% of total dissolved forms. This allows us to evaluate the important role of Me-HS complexes in satisfactory ecological situation in rivers of the Upper Amur basin. However, toxicity may increase in separate watercourses (Chita and Argun rivers) due to high concentrations of dissolved Zn, Cu, and Cr, which indicate local and transboundary sources of pollution.
Notes
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PubMed ID
29236175 View in PubMed
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An online SPE LC-MS/MS method for the analysis of antibiotics in environmental water.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature283186
Source
Environ Sci Pollut Res Int. 2017 Mar;24(9):8692-8699
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2017
Author
Meierjohann Axel
Kortesmäki Ewelina
Brozinski Jenny-Maria
Kronberg Leif
Source
Environ Sci Pollut Res Int. 2017 Mar;24(9):8692-8699
Date
Mar-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Anti-Bacterial Agents - analysis
Chromatography, Liquid - methods
Finland
Online Systems
Rivers - chemistry
Solid Phase Extraction - methods
Tandem Mass Spectrometry - methods
Waste Water - analysis - chemistry
Water Pollutants, Chemical - analysis
Water Purification
Abstract
A fast and simple method for the analysis of 17 commonly used antibiotics in Finland in water samples was developed. The method combines online solid phase extraction using a reusable online trapping column combined with analytical separation on a C18 analytical column and detection by a triple quadrupole mass spectrometer. The method was fully validated for detection and quantification limits as well as linearity, repeatability, and matrix effects. The method gave an excellent linear response (r (2) > 0.99) and detection limits for all compounds (1-10 ng(-1)), except for tetracycline (20 ng l(-1)) and roxithromycin (50 ng l(-1)). The repeatability was evaluated at two concentrations, and the values at 5 ng l(-1) ranged from 5 to 39% and at 100 ng l(-1) ranged from 3 to 19%. To test the method on real samples at low environmental concentrations, water samples collected from a river receiving discharges from two wastewater treatment plants were analyzed as well as samples from a pristine river. Seven antibiotics as well as carbamazepine were detected in the samples. The concentration of the compounds ranged from 5 to 81 ng l(-1).
PubMed ID
28210946 View in PubMed
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Application of CCME Water Quality Index to monitor water quality: a case study of the Mackenzie River Basin, Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature82775
Source
Environ Monit Assess. 2006 Feb;113(1-3):411-29
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2006
Author
Lumb Ashok
Halliwell Doug
Sharma Tribeni
Author Affiliation
Ecological Monitoring and Assessment Network Coordinating Office, Knowledge Integration Directorate, Environment Canada, Canada Center for Inland Waters, Burlington, ON. ashok.lumb@ec.gc.ca
Source
Environ Monit Assess. 2006 Feb;113(1-3):411-29
Date
Feb-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Arctic Regions
Canada
Environmental Monitoring - methods - statistics & numerical data
Quality Control
Rivers - chemistry
Water Pollutants, Chemical - analysis
Water Supply - standards
Abstract
All six ecosystem initiatives evolved from many years of federal, provincial, First Nation, local government and community attention to the stresses on sensitive habitats and species, air and water quality, and the consequent threats to community livability. This paper assesses water quality aspect for the ecosystem initiatives and employs newly developed Canadian Council of Ministers of the Environment Water Quality Index (CCME WQI) which provides a convenient mean of summarizing complex water quality data that can be easily understood by the public, water distributors, planners, managers and policy makers. The CCME WQI incorporates three elements: Scope - the number of water quality parameters (variables) not meeting water quality objectives (F(1)); Frequency - the number of times the objectives are not met (F(2)); and Amplitude. the extent to which the objectives are not met (F(3)). The index produces a number between 0 (worst) to 100 (best) to reflect the water quality. This study evaluates water quality of the Mackenzie - Great Bear sub-basin by employing two modes of objective functions (threshold values): one based on the CCME water quality guidelines and the other based on site-specific values that were determined by the statistical analysis of the historical data base. Results suggest that the water quality of the Mackenzie-Great Bear sub-basin is impacted by high turbidity and total (mostly particulate) trace metals due to high suspended sediment loads during the open water season. Comments are also provided on water quality and human health issues in the Mackenzie basin based on the findings and the usefulness of CCME water quality guidelines and site specific values.
PubMed ID
16474922 View in PubMed
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Artificial sweeteners in a large Canadian river reflect human consumption in the watershed.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature257215
Source
PLoS One. 2013;8(12):e82706
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
Author
John Spoelstra
Sherry L Schiff
Susan J Brown
Author Affiliation
Water Science and Technology Directorate, Environment Canada, Burlington, Ontario, Canada ; Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, Ontario, Canada.
Source
PLoS One. 2013;8(12):e82706
Date
2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Fresh Water - analysis - chemistry
Geography
Humans
Ontario
Rivers - chemistry
Sweetening Agents - analysis - chemistry
Water Pollutants, Chemical - analysis - chemistry
Abstract
Artificial sweeteners have been widely incorporated in human food products for aid in weight loss regimes, dental health protection and dietary control of diabetes. Some of these widely used compounds can pass non-degraded through wastewater treatment systems and are subsequently discharged to groundwater and surface waters. Measurements of artificial sweeteners in rivers used for drinking water production are scarce. In order to determine the riverine concentrations of artificial sweeteners and their usefulness as a tracer of wastewater at the scale of an entire watershed, we analyzed samples from 23 sites along the entire length of the Grand River, a large river in Southern Ontario, Canada, that is impacted by agricultural activities and urban centres. Municipal water from household taps was also sampled from several cities within the Grand River Watershed. Cyclamate, saccharin, sucralose, and acesulfame were found in elevated concentrations despite high rates of biological activity, large daily cycles in dissolved oxygen and shallow river depth. The maximum concentrations that we measured for sucralose (21 µg/L), cyclamate (0.88 µg/L), and saccharin (7.2 µg/L) are the highest reported concentrations of these compounds in surface waters to date anywhere in the world. Acesulfame persists at concentrations that are up to several orders of magnitude above the detection limit over a distance of 300 km and it behaves conservatively in the river, recording the wastewater contribution from the cumulative population in the basin. Acesulfame is a reliable wastewater effluent tracer in rivers. Furthermore, it can be used to assess rates of nutrient assimilation, track wastewater plume dilution, separate human and animal waste contributions and determine the relative persistence of emerging contaminants in impacted watersheds where multiple sources confound the usefulness of other tracers. The effects of artificial sweeteners on aquatic biota in rivers and in the downstream Great Lakes are largely unknown.
Notes
Cites: Food Chem Toxicol. 2011 Oct;49(10):2575-921742009
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PubMed ID
24349342 View in PubMed
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Assessing ecotoxicity of biomining effluents in stream ecosystems by in situ invertebrate bioassays: A case study in Talvivaara, Finland.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature284211
Source
Environ Toxicol Chem. 2017 Jan;36(1):147-155
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2017
Author
Johanna Salmelin
Matti T Leppänen
Anna K Karjalainen
Kari-Matti Vuori
Almut Gerhardt
Heikki Hämäläinen
Source
Environ Toxicol Chem. 2017 Jan;36(1):147-155
Date
Jan-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Behavior, Animal - drug effects
Biological Assay
Ecosystem
Ecotoxicology
Environmental Monitoring - methods
Finland
Insects
Mining
Oligochaeta - drug effects
Rivers - chemistry
Water Pollutants, Chemical - analysis - toxicity
Abstract
Mining of sulfide-rich pyritic ores produces acid mine drainage waters and has induced major ecological problems in aquatic ecosystems worldwide. Biomining utilizes microbes to extract metals from the ore, and it has been suggested as a new sustainable way to produce metals. However, little is known of the potential ecotoxicological effects of biomining. In the present study, biomining impacts were assessed using survival and behavioral responses of aquatic macroinvertebrates at in situ exposures in streams. The authors used an impedance conversion technique to measure quantitatively in situ behavioral responses of larvae of the regionally common mayfly, Heptagenia dalecarlica, to discharges from the Talvivaara mine (Sotkamo, Northern Finland), which uses a biomining technique. Behavioral responses measured in 3 mine-impacted streams were compared with those measured in 3 reference streams. In addition, 3-d survival of the mayfly larvae and the oligochaete Lumbriculus variegatus was measured in the study sites. Biomining impacts on stream water quality included increased concentrations of sulfur, sulfate, and metals, especially manganese, cadmium, zinc, sodium, and calcium. Survival of the invertebrates in the short term was not affected by the mine effluents. In contrast, apparent behavioral changes in mayfly larvae were detected, but these responses were not consistent among sites, which may reflect differing natural water chemistry of the study sites. Environ Toxicol Chem 2017;36:147-155. © 2016 SETAC.
PubMed ID
27253991 View in PubMed
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Assessing the effects of hydromorphological degradation on macroinvertebrate indicators in rivers: examples, constraints, and outlook.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature89057
Source
Integr Environ Assess Manag. 2009 Jan;5(1):86-96
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2009
Author
Friberg Nikolai
Sandin Leonard
Pedersen Morten L
Author Affiliation
Macaulay Land Use Research Institute, Catchment Management Group, Craigiebuckler, Aberdeen AB15 8QH, United Kingdom. n.friberg@macaulay.ac.uk
Source
Integr Environ Assess Manag. 2009 Jan;5(1):86-96
Date
Jan-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Conservation of Natural Resources
Ecosystem
Environmental Monitoring - methods
Geology
Invertebrates - drug effects
Rivers - chemistry
Sweden
Water Movements
Water Pollutants, Chemical - toxicity
Abstract
An extensive amount of literature on linkages between the in-stream physical environment and river benthic macroinvertebrates reports a number of relationships across multiple spatial scales. We analyzed data on different spatial scales to elucidate the linkages between different measurements of hydromorphological degradation and commonly used macroinvertebrate indices. A regression analysis of 1049 sites from 3 countries revealed that the strongest relationship between a biotic metric--average score per taxon--and physiochemical variables (R2 = 0.61) was obtained with a multiple regression model that included concentration of total phosphorus and percent arable land in the catchment, as well as hydromorphological quality variables. Analyses of 3 data sets from streams primarily affected by hydromorphological degradation showed an overall weak relationship (max R2 = 0.25) with the River Habitat Survey data of 28 Swedish streams, whereas moderate (R2 approximately 0.43) relationships with more detailed measurements of morphology were found in 2 Danish studies (39 and 6 streams, respectively). Although evidence exists in the literature on the importance of physical features for in-stream biota in general and macroinvertebrates specifically, we found only relatively weak relationships between various measures of hydromorphological stress and commonly used macroinvertebrate assessment tools. We attribute this to a combination of factors, including 1) the mixed nature of pressures acting on the majority of river reaches, 2) scaling issues (spatial and temporal) when relating habitat surveys to macroinvertebrate assessments, and 3) the scope of commonly used macroinvertebrate assessment systems (mainly focusing on water chemistry perturbation, such as eutrophication and acidification). The need is urgent to develop refined and updated biological assessment systems targeting hydromorphological stress for the use of the European Water Framework Directive (WFD) and national water-related policies.
PubMed ID
19431294 View in PubMed
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Atmospheric Transport and Deposition of Bromoanisoles Along a Temperate to Arctic Gradient.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature291852
Source
Environ Sci Technol. 2017 Oct 03; 51(19):10974-10982
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Oct-03-2017
Author
Terry F Bidleman
Eva Brorström-Lundén
Katarina Hansson
Hjalmar Laudon
Olle Nygren
Mats Tysklind
Author Affiliation
Department of Chemistry, Umeå University , SE-901 87 Umeå, Sweden.
Source
Environ Sci Technol. 2017 Oct 03; 51(19):10974-10982
Date
Oct-03-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Anisoles - analysis - chemistry
Arctic Regions
Baltic States
Environmental Monitoring - methods
Finland
Oceans and Seas
Rivers - chemistry
Sweden
Abstract
Bromoanisoles (BAs) arise from O-methylation of bromophenols, produced by marine algae and invertebrates. BAs undergo sea-air exchange and are transported over the oceans. Here we report 2,4-DiBA and 2,4,6-TriBA in air and deposition on the Swedish west coast (Råö) and the interior of arctic Finland (Pallas). Results are discussed in perspective with previous measurements in the northern Baltic region in 2011-2013. BAs in air decreased from south to north in the order Råö > northern Baltic > Pallas. Geometric mean concentrations at Pallas increased significantly (p
PubMed ID
28885011 View in PubMed
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120 records – page 1 of 12.