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A 15-year prospective study of shift work and disability pension.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature93753
Source
Occup Environ Med. 2008 Apr;65(4):283-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2008
Author
Tüchsen F.
Christensen K B
Lund T.
Feveile H.
Author Affiliation
National Research Centre for the Working Environment, Lersø Parkallé 105, DK-2100 Copenhagen Ø, Denmark. ftu@nrcwe.dk
Source
Occup Environ Med. 2008 Apr;65(4):283-5
Date
Apr-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Denmark - epidemiology
Disabled persons - statistics & numerical data
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Occupational Diseases - epidemiology - etiology
Occupational Health - statistics & numerical data
Pensions - statistics & numerical data
Prospective Studies
Retirement
Risk Assessment - methods
Sex Factors
Work Schedule Tolerance
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To estimate the hazard ratio for disability pension associated with shift work. METHODS: Cohorts of shift and day workers were identified in three waves of the Danish Work Environment Cohort Study and followed up for incidence of disability pension in a national register of social transfer payment. A total of 3980 female and 4025 male employees were included in the cohorts. Information about shift work status, age, smoking habits, body mass index and ergonomic work environment were updated according to responses in subsequent waves of the survey when possible. Respondents reporting shift work were classified as shift workers in the following waves as well. Respondents were followed in the register from the time of first interview and were censored at the time of their 60th birthday, emigration, death or end of follow-up (18 June 2006). The authors used the Cox proportional hazards model to estimate hazard ratios for incidence of disability pension and 95% confidence intervals. RESULTS: The authors observed 253 new disability pensions among women and 173 among men during 56 903 and 57 886 person-years at risk respectively, Among women, shift work predicted disability after adjustment for age, general health and socioeconomic status HR 1.39 (95% CI 1.07 to 1.82). After further adjustment for body mass index, smoking habits, socioeconomic status and ergonomic exposures the association remained statistically significant HR 1.34 (95% CI 1.02 to 1.75). Shift work was not associated with disability among men. CONCLUSION: Shift work might be moderately associated with disability pension among women; however, more powerful studies are needed to establish the possible association.
PubMed ID
18198201 View in PubMed
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18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography-computed tomography for suspected recurrent papillary thyroid cancer: early experience at Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature153281
Source
J Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg. 2008 Oct;37(5):712-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2008
Author
Max Dahele
Yee C Ung
Lisa Ehrlich
Jay Silverberg
Judith Balogh
C Shun Wong
Author Affiliation
Departmentof Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, Edmond Odette Cancer Centre,Toronto, Ontario.
Source
J Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg. 2008 Oct;37(5):712-7
Date
Oct-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Biological Markers - blood
Cancer Care Facilities
Carcinoma, Papillary - pathology - radionuclide imaging - surgery
Cohort Studies
Female
Fluorodeoxyglucose F18 - diagnostic use
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Neoplasm Recurrence, Local - pathology - radionuclide imaging - surgery
Neoplasm Staging
Ontario
Positron-Emission Tomography - methods
Reproducibility of Results
Retrospective Studies
Risk assessment
Sensitivity and specificity
Thyroglobulin - blood
Thyroid Neoplasms - pathology - radionuclide imaging - surgery
Thyroidectomy - methods
Time Factors
Treatment Outcome
Young Adult
Abstract
To report the initial experience with combined 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG PET)/computed tomography (CT) imaging for suspected recurrent papillary differentiated thyroid cancer (DTC) at Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre (SHSC), Toronto.
Single institution retrospective study.
Consecutive patients from SHSC who underwent FDG PET/CT imaging for suspected recurrent DTC over a period of 2.5 years were identified and their charts reviewed.
Qualitative appraisal of FDG PET/CT imaging in suspected recurrent DTC.
Sixteen patients (14F, 2M) were identified accounting for 17 FDG PET/CT scans. Three scans (18%) in 3 different patients were reported as suspicious for recurrent disease in the neck (1-3 lesions) and were considered "positive". All were subsequently confirmed pathologically (4-13 positive lymph nodes post operatively). Prior conventional imaging was abnormal in two patients. Two patients had an elevated non-stimulated thyroglobulin (TG)
PubMed ID
19128681 View in PubMed
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24-hour noise dose and risk assessment.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature186267
Source
Appl Occup Environ Hyg. 2003 Apr;18(4):232-3
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2003

25-Hydroxyvitamin D concentrations and risk of venous thromboembolism in the general population with 18,791 participants.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature117634
Source
J Thromb Haemost. 2013 Mar;11(3):423-31
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2013
Author
P. Brøndum-Jacobsen
M. Benn
A. Tybjaerg-Hansen
B G Nordestgaard
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical Biochemistry, Herlev Hospital, Copenhagen University Hospital, Herlev, Denmark.
Source
J Thromb Haemost. 2013 Mar;11(3):423-31
Date
Mar-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Biological Markers - blood
Denmark
Down-Regulation
Female
Humans
Incidence
Kaplan-Meier Estimate
Linear Models
Male
Middle Aged
Multivariate Analysis
Proportional Hazards Models
Prospective Studies
Risk assessment
Risk factors
Seasons
Time Factors
Venous Thromboembolism - blood - diagnosis - epidemiology
Vitamin D - analogs & derivatives - blood
Vitamin D Deficiency - blood - diagnosis - epidemiology
Abstract
Vitamin D has potential antithrombotic effects, suggesting that vitamin D analogs could be used as adjunctive antithrombotic agents. However, epidemiologic evidence of an association between reduced 25-hydroxyvitamin D concentrations and the risk of venous thromboembolism is lacking.
To test the hypothesis that reduced plasma 25-hydroxyvitamin D concentrations are associated with an increased risk of venous thromboembolism in the general population.
We prospectively studied 18 791 participants from the Copenhagen City Heart Study and the Copenhagen General Population Study. During up to 30 years of follow-up, 950 participants were diagnosed with venous thromboembolism. Plasma 25-hydroxyvitamin D concentrations were adjusted for seasonal variation.
The cumulative incidence of venous thromboembolism as a function of age increased with decreasing tertiles of seasonally adjusted plasma 25-hydroxyvitamin D (log-rank trend: P = 4 × 10(-4) ). On comparison of participants in the lowest and the highest tertile of plasma 25-hydroxyvitamin D concentrations, the crude risk estimate in a model adjusted for age and sex was a 37% (95% confidence interval [CI] 15-64%) increased risk of venous thromboembolism. The corresponding risk increase in a model adjusted for age, sex, body mass index, smoking and cancer was 26% (95% CI 5-51%), and in a multivariable-adjusted model also including physical activity, hormone replacement therapy, menopausal status, oral contraception use and lipid-lowering therapy it was 28% (95% CI 6-53%). Furthermore, corresponding risk increases with attempts to correct for regression dilution bias were 103% (95% CI 37-202%), 70% (95% CI 14-155%) and 73% (95% CI 15-160%) in the three models, respectively.
In these large general population studies, we observed a stepwise increasing risk of venous thromboembolism with decreasing tertiles of seasonally adjusted plasma 25-hydroxyvitamin D concentrations.
PubMed ID
23279309 View in PubMed
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25-hydroxyvitamin d levels and risk of ischemic heart disease, myocardial infarction, and early death: population-based study and meta-analyses of 18 and 17 studies.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature121124
Source
Arterioscler Thromb Vasc Biol. 2012 Nov;32(11):2794-802
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2012
Author
Peter Brøndum-Jacobsen
Marianne Benn
Gorm B Jensen
Børge G Nordestgaard
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical Biochemistry, Herlev Hospital, Copenhagen University Hospital, Herlev Ringvej 75, DK-2730 Herlev, Denmark.
Source
Arterioscler Thromb Vasc Biol. 2012 Nov;32(11):2794-802
Date
Nov-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Biological Markers - blood
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Incidence
Kaplan-Meier Estimate
Male
Middle Aged
Multivariate Analysis
Myocardial Infarction - blood - epidemiology - mortality
Myocardial Ischemia - blood - epidemiology - mortality
Prognosis
Proportional Hazards Models
Prospective Studies
Risk assessment
Risk factors
Time Factors
Vitamin D - analogs & derivatives - blood
Vitamin D Deficiency - blood - diagnosis - epidemiology - mortality
Abstract
We tested the hypothesis that reduced plasma 25-hydroxyvitamin D associates with increased risk of ischemic heart disease, myocardial infarction, and early death.
We measured baseline plasma 25-hydroxyvitamin D in 10 170 women and men from the Danish general population without vitamin D-fortified food. During 29 years of follow-up, 3100 persons developed ischemic heart disease, 1625 myocardial infarction, and 6747 died. Decreasing plasma 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels were associated with increasing risk of ischemic heart disease, myocardial infarction, and early death as a function of seasonally adjusted percentile categories (P for trend, 2×10(-4)-3×10(-53)). Comparing individuals with plasma 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels at the 1st to 4th percentile with individuals with levels at the 50th to 100th percentile, the multivariable adjusted risk was increased by 40% (95% CI, 14%-72%) for ischemic heart disease, by 64% (25%-114%) for myocardial infarction, by 57% (38%-78%) for early death, and by 81% (40%-135%) for fatal ischemic heart disease/myocardial infarction. In the meta-analyses of 18 and 17 studies, risk of ischemic heart disease and early death were increased by 39% (25%-54%) and 46% (31%-64%) for lowest versus highest quartile of 25-hydroxyvitamin D level.
We observed increasing risk of ischemic heart disease, myocardial infarction, and early death with decreasing plasma 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels. These findings were substantiated in meta-analyses.
PubMed ID
22936341 View in PubMed
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28-Joint count disease activity score at 3 months after diagnosis of early rheumatoid arthritis is strongly associated with direct and indirect costs over the following 4 years: the Swedish TIRA project.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature137343
Source
Rheumatology (Oxford). 2011 Jul;50(7):1259-67
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2011
Author
Eva Hallert
Magnus Husberg
Thomas Skogh
Author Affiliation
Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Center for Medical Technology Assessment, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden. eva.hallert@liu.se
Source
Rheumatology (Oxford). 2011 Jul;50(7):1259-67
Date
Jul-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Arthritis, Rheumatoid - diagnosis - economics - therapy
Cohort Studies
Cost of Illness
Disease Progression
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Health Care Costs
Health Expenditures
Humans
Linear Models
Male
Middle Aged
Predictive value of tests
Prospective Studies
Risk assessment
Severity of Illness Index
Sweden
Time Factors
Abstract
To explore possible association between disease activity at 3-month follow-up after RA diagnosis and costs over the following 4 years.
Three-hundred and twenty patients with early (= 1 year) RA were assessed at regular intervals. Clinical and laboratory data were collected and patients reported health-care utilization and number of days lost from work. At 3-month follow-up, patients were divided into two groups according to disease activity, using DAS-28 with a cut-off level at 3.2. Direct and indirect costs and EuroQol-5D over the following 4 years were compared between the groups. Multivariate regression models were used to control for possible covariates.
Three months after diagnosis, a DAS-28 level of = 3.2 was associated with high direct and indirect costs over the following 4 years. Patients with DAS-28 = 3.2 at 3-month follow-up had more visits to physician, physiotherapist, occupational therapist and nurse, higher drug costs, more days in hospital and more extensive surgery compared with patients with 3-month DAS-28
PubMed ID
21292734 View in PubMed
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30-day mortality after coronary artery bypass grafting and valve surgery has greatly improved over the last decade, but the 1-year mortality remains constant.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature269410
Source
Ann Card Anaesth. 2015 Apr-Jun;18(2):138-42
Publication Type
Article
Author
Laura Sommer Hansen
Vibeke Elisabeth Hjortdal
Jan Jesper Andreasen
Poul Erik Mortensen
Carl-Johan Jakobsen
Source
Ann Card Anaesth. 2015 Apr-Jun;18(2):138-42
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Aged
Analysis of Variance
Cohort Studies
Coronary Artery Bypass - mortality
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Heart Valves - surgery
Humans
Kaplan-Meier Estimate
Male
Postoperative Complications - mortality
Risk assessment
Risk factors
Sex Factors
Abstract
European system for cardiac operative risk evaluation (EuroSCORE) is a valuable tool in control of the quality of cardiac surgery. However, the validity of the risk score for the individual patient may be questioned. The present study was carried out to investigate whether the continued fall in short-term mortality reflects an actual improvement in late mortality, and subsequently, to investigate EuroSCORE as predictor of 1-year mortality.
A population-based cohort study of 25,602 patients from a 12-year period from three public university hospitals undergoing coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) or valve surgery. Analysis was carried out based on EuroSCORE, age and co-morbidity factors (residual EuroSCORE).
During the period the average age increased from 65.1 ± 10.0 years to 68.9 ± 10.7 years (P
Notes
Comment In: Ann Card Anaesth. 2015 Apr-Jun;18(2):143-425849680
PubMed ID
25849679 View in PubMed
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30-day mortality and major complications after radical prostatectomy: influence of age and comorbidity.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature172378
Source
J Natl Cancer Inst. 2005 Oct 19;97(20):1525-32
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-19-2005
Author
Shabbir M H Alibhai
Marc Leach
George Tomlinson
Murray D Krahn
Neil Fleshner
Eric Holowaty
Gary Naglie
Author Affiliation
Division of General Internal Medicine and Clinical Epidemiology, University Health Network, Toronto, Canada. shabbir.alibhai@uhn.on.ca
Source
J Natl Cancer Inst. 2005 Oct 19;97(20):1525-32
Date
Oct-19-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Aged
Cohort Studies
Comorbidity
Humans
Logistic Models
Male
Middle Aged
Multivariate Analysis
Ontario - epidemiology
Prostatectomy - adverse effects - methods - mortality
Prostatic Neoplasms - mortality - surgery
Registries
Retrospective Studies
Risk assessment
Risk factors
Abstract
Radical prostatectomy is associated with excellent long-term disease control for localized prostate cancer. Prior studies have suggested an increased risk of short-term complications among older men who underwent radical prostatectomy, but these studies did not adjust for comorbidity.
We examined mortality and complications occurring within 30 days following radical prostatectomy among all 11,010 men who underwent this surgery in Ontario, Canada, between 1990 and 1999 using multivariable logistic regression modeling. We adjusted for comorbidity using two common comorbidity indices. Statistical tests were two-sided.
Overall, 53 men (0.5%) died, and 2195 [corrected] (19.9%[corrected]) had one or more complications within 30 days of radical prostatectomy. In models adjusted for comorbidity and year of surgery, age was associated with an increased risk of 30-day mortality (odds ratio = 2.04 per decade of age, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.23 to 3.39). However, the absolute 30-day mortality risk was low, even in older men, at 0.66% (95% CI = 0.2 to 1.1%) for men aged 70-79 years. In adjusted models, age was associated with an increased risk of cardiac (Ptrend
Notes
Comment In: J Natl Cancer Inst. 2006 Mar 15;98(6):421; author reply 421-216537836
Erratum In: J Natl Cancer Inst. 2007 Nov 7;99(21):1648
PubMed ID
16234566 View in PubMed
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40-Year CHD Mortality Trends and the Role of Risk Factors in Mortality Decline: The North Karelia Project Experience.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature289324
Source
Glob Heart. 2016 06; 11(2):207-12
Publication Type
Journal Article
Review
Date
06-2016
Author
Pekka Jousilahti
Tiina Laatikainen
Veikko Salomaa
Arto Pietilä
Erkki Vartiainen
Pekka Puska
Author Affiliation
National Institute for Health and Welfare, Department of Health, Helsinki, Finland. Electronic address: pekka.jousilahti@thl.fi.
Source
Glob Heart. 2016 06; 11(2):207-12
Date
06-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Review
Keywords
Cardiovascular Diseases - mortality - prevention & control
Finland - epidemiology
Forecasting
Public Health
Risk Assessment - methods
Risk factors
Survival Rate - trends
Abstract
In the 1960s and early 1970s, coronary heart disease (CHD) mortality in Finland was the highest in the world, and within Finland, mortality was particularly high in the eastern part of the country. The North Karelia Project, the first large community-based cardiovascular diseases prevention program was established in 1972 to reduce the extremely high CHD mortality through behavioral change and reduction of the main cardiovascular disease risk factors among the whole population of North Karelia, the easternmost province of Finland. During the 40-year period from 1972 to 2012, smoking prevalence, serum total cholesterol, and systolic blood pressure declined markedly, except a small increase in serum cholesterol levels between 2007 and 2012. From the early 1970s to 2012, CHD mortality decreased by 82% (from 643 to 118 per 100,000) among working-age (35 to 64 years) men. Among working-age women, the decline was 84% (from 114 to 17 per 100,000). During the first 10 years, changes in these 3 target risk factors explained nearly all of the observed mortality reduction. Since the mid-1980s, the observed reduction in mortality has been larger than the predicted reduction. In the early 1970s, premature CHD mortality (35 to 74 years) was about 37% higher among Eastern Finnish men and 23% higher among Eastern Finnish women, compared with men and women in Southwestern Finland. During the last 40 years, premature CHD mortality declined markedly in both areas, but the decline was larger in Eastern Finland and the mortality gap between the two areas nearly disappeared.
PubMed ID
27242088 View in PubMed
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9498 records – page 2 of 950.