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Adolescence risk factors are predictive of coronary artery calcification at middle age: the cardiovascular risk in young Finns study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature120679
Source
J Am Coll Cardiol. 2012 Oct 9;60(15):1364-70
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-9-2012
Author
Olli Hartiala
Costan G Magnussen
Sami Kajander
Juhani Knuuti
Heikki Ukkonen
Antti Saraste
Irina Rinta-Kiikka
Sakari Kainulainen
Mika Kähönen
Nina Hutri-Kähönen
Tomi Laitinen
Terho Lehtimäki
Jorma S A Viikari
Jaakko Hartiala
Markus Juonala
Olli T Raitakari
Author Affiliation
Research Centre of Applied and Preventive Cardiovascular Medicine, University of Turku, and Turku PET Center, Turku University Hospital, Turku, Finland. olli.hartiala@utu.fi
Source
J Am Coll Cardiol. 2012 Oct 9;60(15):1364-70
Date
Oct-9-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Calcinosis - complications - diagnosis - epidemiology
Child
Child, Preschool
Coronary Artery Disease - epidemiology - etiology - pathology
Coronary Vessels - pathology
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Incidence
Male
Middle Aged
Prognosis
Retrospective Studies
Risk Assessment - methods
Time Factors
Young Adult
Abstract
The purpose of this study was to examine the roles of adolescence risk factors in predicting coronary artery calcium (CAC).
Elevated coronary heart disease risk factor levels in adolescence may predict subsequent CAC independently of change in risk factor levels from adolescence to adulthood.
CAC was assessed in 589 subjects 40 to 46 years of age from the Cardiovascular Risk in Young Finns Study. Risk factor levels were measured in 1980 (12 to 18 years) and in 2007.
The prevalence of any CAC was 19.2% (27.9% in men and 12.2% in women). Age, levels of systolic blood pressure (BP), total cholesterol, and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) in adolescence, as well as systolic BP, total cholesterol, diastolic BP, and pack-years of smoking in adulthood were higher among subjects with CAC than those without CAC. Adolescence LDL-C and systolic BP levels predicted CAC in adulthood independently of 27-year changes in these risk factors. The multivariable odds ratios were 1.34 (95% confidence interval: 1.05 to 1.70; p=0.02) and 1.38 (95% confidence interval: 1.08 to 1.77; p=0.01), for 1-SD increase in adolescence LDL-C and systolic BP, respectively. Exposure to both of these risk factors in adolescence (defined as values at or above the age- and sex-specific 75th percentile) substantially increased the risk of CAC (multivariable odds ratio: 3.5 [95% confidence interval: 1.7 to 7.2; p=0.007]) between groups with no versus both risk factors.
Elevated adolescence LDL-C and systolic BP levels are independent predictors of adulthood CAC, indicating that adolescence risk factor levels play an important role in the pathogenesis of coronary heart disease.
Notes
Comment In: J Am Coll Cardiol. 2012 Oct 9;60(15):1371-322981554
PubMed ID
22981553 View in PubMed
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Adulthood EAS-temperament and carotid artery intima-media thickness: the Cardiovascular Risk in Young Finns study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature138600
Source
Psychol Health. 2011 Jan;26(1):61-75
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2011
Author
Laura Pulkki-Råback
Sampsa Puttonen
Marko Elovainio
Olli T Raitakari
Markus Juonala
Liisa Keltikangas-Jarvinen
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychology, University of Helsinki, FIN-00014 Helsinki, Finland. laura.pulkki-raback@helsinki.fi
Source
Psychol Health. 2011 Jan;26(1):61-75
Date
Jan-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Atherosclerosis - epidemiology - psychology
Cardiovascular Diseases - epidemiology - psychology
Carotid Arteries - anatomy & histology
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Male
Risk assessment
Temperament - physiology
Tunica Intima - anatomy & histology
Young Adult
Abstract
We examined the association between adulthood emotionality-activity-sociability temperament scale and preclinical atherosclerosis and, whether this association is mediated by cardiovascular risk factors (low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, systolic blood pressure, diastolic blood pressure and body-mass index (BMI)). The participants were a nationally representative sample of 537 men and 811 women from the Cardiovascular Risk in Young Finns study aged 15-30 years at the baseline in 1992 and aged 24-39 years at the follow-up in 2001. Carotid atherosclerosis was assessed by ultrasound scans of the common carotid artery intima-media thickness (IMT) and brachial flow-mediated dilation (FMD). In men, there was an association between the temperament dimension activity and IMT (ß = 0.08, p = 0.036) which was partially mediated by BMI (ß decreased from 0.08 to 0.05; p-value of Sobel test = 0.002). However, after correction for multiple comparisons the association between IMT and the temperament dimension activity in men was only of borderline significance. In women, there were no associations between temperament and IMT or FMD. These results suggest that a highly active temperament may contribute to early signs of atherosclerosis in men and that body mass may mediate this association.
PubMed ID
21161826 View in PubMed
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Alcohol consumption is directly associated with carotid intima-media thickness in Finnish young adults: the Cardiovascular Risk in Young Finns Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature153337
Source
Atherosclerosis. 2009 Jun;204(2):e93-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2009
Author
Markus Juonala
Jorma S A Viikari
Mika Kähönen
Tomi Laitinen
Leena Taittonen
Britt-Marie Loo
Antti Jula
Jukka Marniemi
Leena Räsänen
Tapani Rönnemaa
Olli T Raitakari
Author Affiliation
University of Turku, Department of Medicine, Finland. markus.juonala@utu.fi
Source
Atherosclerosis. 2009 Jun;204(2):e93-8
Date
Jun-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Alcohol Drinking - adverse effects - epidemiology
Cardiovascular Diseases - epidemiology - etiology
Carotid Arteries - ultrasonography
Carotid Artery Diseases - epidemiology - etiology - ultrasonography
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Linear Models
Male
Risk assessment
Risk factors
Tunica Intima - ultrasonography
Tunica Media - ultrasonography
Young Adult
Abstract
There is substantial epidemiological data suggesting a J- or U-shaped association between alcohol consumption and coronary events. However, some studies in experimental animals suggest that alcohol may increase atherosclerosis. Therefore, our aim was to study whether alcohol consumption is associated with carotid intima-media thickness (IMT), marker of subclinical atherosclerosis, in young, healthy adults.
Alcohol consumption, carotid IMT and conventional cardiovascular risk factors were investigated in 2074 subjects, aged 24-39 years.
In subjects consuming none, >0 to or=4 units of alcohol per day, the respective carotid IMT values were 0.57+/-0.004, 0.59+/-0.003, 0.59+/-0.006, and 0.60+/-0.012 mm (mean+/-S.E.M., P
PubMed ID
19124122 View in PubMed
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Apolipoprotein B, oxidized low-density lipoprotein, and LDL particle size in predicting the incidence of metabolic syndrome: the Cardiovascular Risk in Young Finns study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature130840
Source
Eur J Prev Cardiol. 2012 Dec;19(6):1296-303
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2012
Author
Juha Koskinen
Costan G Magnussen
Peter Würtz
Pasi Soininen
Antti J Kangas
Jorma Sa Viikari
Mika Kähönen
Britt-Marie Loo
Antti Jula
Markku Ahotupa
Terho Lehtimäki
Mika Ala-Korpela
Markus Juonala
Olli T Raitakari
Author Affiliation
Research Center of Applied and Preventive Cardiovascular Medicine, University of Turku, Kiinamyllynkatu 10, Turku, Finland. jkkosk@utu.fi
Source
Eur J Prev Cardiol. 2012 Dec;19(6):1296-303
Date
Dec-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Apolipoprotein A-I - blood
Apolipoproteins B - blood
Biological Markers - blood
Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Incidence
Lipoproteins, LDL - blood
Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy
Male
Metabolic Syndrome X - blood - epidemiology
Odds Ratio
Particle Size
Risk assessment
Risk factors
Time Factors
Abstract
To test whether serum apolipoprotein B (apoB) and low-density lipoprotein (LDL) particle characteristics (oxidation and mean particle size) predict the incidence of metabolic syndrome (MetS).
The 6-year follow-up study included 1429 adults (baseline mean age 31.5). Lipids, apoB, and apoA1 were measured at baseline in 2001. LDL oxidation was measured with monoclonal antibody-based enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (oxLDL-prot) and with a method measuring oxidized lipids in LDL (oxLDL-lipids). Mean LDL particle size was calculated from proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy data.
Increased concentrations of both oxLDL-measures were associated with increased apoB levels but not with LDL particle size. The odds ratios (95% confidence intervals) for MetS incidence during a 6-year follow up by quartiles of apoB were 2.0 (1.0-3.8) for the second quartile, 3.1 (1.7-5.7) for the third quartile, and 4.2 (2.3-7.6) for the fourth quartile. This association remained after adjusting for age, sex, body mass index, homeostasis model assessment for insulin resistance, C-reactive protein, smoking, LDL cholesterol, oxidized LDL measures (p?=?0.01) in addition to risk factors comprising the MetS (p?=?0.03). OxLDL-prot and oxLDL-lipids levels were not independently associated with incident MetS after adjusting for apoB. Mean LDL particle size was not associated with the incidence of MetS.
ApoB is associated with increased risk of MetS incidence. We found no clear evidence to suggest that increased LDL oxidation or small mean LDL particle size would facilitate the development of MetS.
PubMed ID
21960651 View in PubMed
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Arterial pulse wave velocity in relation to carotid intima-media thickness, brachial flow-mediated dilation and carotid artery distensibility: the Cardiovascular Risk in Young Finns Study and the Health 2000 Survey.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature131842
Source
Atherosclerosis. 2012 Feb;220(2):387-93
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2012
Author
Teemu Koivistoinen
Marko Virtanen
Nina Hutri-Kähönen
Terho Lehtimäki
Antti Jula
Markus Juonala
Leena Moilanen
Heikki Aatola
Jari Hyttinen
Jorma S A Viikari
Olli T Raitakari
Mika Kähönen
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical Physiology, University of Tampere and Tampere University Hospital, FI-33521, Tampere, Finland. teemu.koivistoinen@uta.fi
Source
Atherosclerosis. 2012 Feb;220(2):387-93
Date
Feb-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Analysis of Variance
Brachial Artery - physiopathology - ultrasonography
Carotid Arteries - pathology - physiopathology - ultrasonography
Carotid Artery Diseases - diagnosis - epidemiology - pathology - physiopathology
Carotid Intima-Media Thickness
Chi-Square Distribution
Compliance
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Health Surveys
Humans
Linear Models
Male
Middle Aged
Multivariate Analysis
Plethysmography, Impedance
Predictive value of tests
Prognosis
Pulsatile Flow
Risk assessment
Risk factors
Vasodilation
Abstract
Increased arterial pulse wave velocity (PWV) is a strong predictor of cardiovascular events and mortality. The data regarding the relationships between PWV and other indices of vascular damage is limited and partly controversial. We conducted the present study to examine PWV in relation to non-invasive measures of early atherosclerosis (brachial flow-mediated dilation [FMD], carotid intima-media thickness [IMT]) and local arterial stiffness (carotid artery distensibility [Cdist]).
The study population consisted of 1754 young adults (aged 30-45 years, 45.5% males) participating in the Cardiovascular Risk in Young Finns Study (YFS), and of 336 older adults (aged 46-76 years, 43.2% males) participating in the Health 2000 Survey. FMD was measured only in the YFS cohort. FMD, IMT and Cdist were assessed by ultrasound, and PWV was measured using the whole-body impedance cardiography device.
In young adults, FMD and IMT were not associated with PWV independently of cardiovascular risk factors. Moreover, FMD status was not found to modulate the association between cardiovascular risk factors and PWV. In older adults, PWV and IMT were directly and independently associated (?=1.233, p=0.019). In both cohorts, PWV was inversely related with Cdist, and this relation remained significant (p
Notes
Comment In: Atherosclerosis. 2012 Feb;220(2):319-2021899842
PubMed ID
21871623 View in PubMed
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Association of thyrotropin with arterial pulse wave velocity in young adults: the Cardiovascular Risk in Young Finns Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature267608
Source
Scand J Clin Lab Invest. 2014 Nov;74(8):716-21
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2014
Author
Siiri Hjelt
Heikki Aatola
Mika Kähönen
Markus Juonala
Teemu Koivistoinen
Terho Lehtimäki
Jorma S A Viikari
Olli T Raitakari
Tomi Laitinen
Nina Hutri-Kähönen
Source
Scand J Clin Lab Invest. 2014 Nov;74(8):716-21
Date
Nov-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Cardiovascular Diseases - blood - physiopathology
Finland
Humans
Middle Aged
Multivariate Analysis
Pulse Wave Analysis
Risk assessment
Risk factors
Thyrotropin - blood
Abstract
Limited data are available regarding the relationship of thyrotropin (TSH) and arterial pulse wave velocity (PWV) at population level. Therefore, we conducted the present study to determine whether TSH is related to PWV assessed in young adulthood.
The study population consisted of 1598 Finnish white young adults (aged 30-45 years, 47.4% males) who had TSH, traditional cardiovascular risk factors, and PWV measured in 2007. PWV measurements were performed using a whole-body impedance cardiography device.
In bivariate association analyses, TSH level was significantly associated with body mass index (BMI), smoking, diastolic blood pressure, triglyceride and insulin levels (p
PubMed ID
25185682 View in PubMed
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Associations between serum uric acid and markers of subclinical atherosclerosis in young adults. The cardiovascular risk in Young Finns study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature122953
Source
Atherosclerosis. 2012 Aug;223(2):497-503
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2012
Author
Mervi Oikonen
Maria Wendelin-Saarenhovi
Leo-Pekka Lyytikäinen
Niina Siitonen
Britt-Marie Loo
Antti Jula
Ilkka Seppälä
Liisa Saarikoski
Terho Lehtimäki
Nina Hutri-Kähönen
Markus Juonala
Mika Kähönen
Risto Huupponen
Jorma S A Viikari
Olli T Raitakari
Author Affiliation
The Centre of Applied and Preventive Cardiovascular Medicine, University of Turku, Kiinamyllynkatu 10, P.O. Box 52, FI-20520 Turku, Finland.
Source
Atherosclerosis. 2012 Aug;223(2):497-503
Date
Aug-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Asymptomatic Diseases
Atherosclerosis - blood - diagnosis - epidemiology - physiopathology
Biological Markers - blood
Body mass index
Cardiovascular Diseases - blood - epidemiology - physiopathology
Carotid Intima-Media Thickness
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Hemodynamics
Humans
Least-Squares Analysis
Logistic Models
Male
Middle Aged
Multivariate Analysis
Predictive value of tests
Risk assessment
Risk factors
Uric Acid - blood
Abstract
Serum uric acid (SUA) is a suggested biomarker for established coronary artery disease, but the role of SUA in early phases of atherosclerosis is controversial. The relations of SUA with vascular markers of subclinical atherosclerosis, including carotid artery intima-media thickness (cIMT), carotid plaque, carotid distensibility (Cdist) and brachial flow-mediated dilatation (FMD) were examined in 1985 young adults aged 30-45 years. In addition to ordinary regression, we used Mendelian randomization techniques to infer causal associations.
In women, the independent multivariate correlates of SUA included BMI, creatinine, alcohol use, triglycerides, glucose and adiponectin (inverse association) (Model R(2) = 0.30). In men, the correlates were BMI, creatinine, triglycerides, C-reactive protein, alcohol use, total cholesterol and adiponectin (inverse) (Model R(2) = 0.33). BMI alone explained most of the variation of SUA levels both in women and men (Partial R(2) ~ 0.2). When SUA was modeled as an explanatory variable for vascular markers, it directly associated with cIMT and inversely with Cdist in age- and sex-adjusted analysis. After further adjustments for BMI or glomerular filtration rate, these relations were reduced to non-significance. No associations were found between SUA and FMD or the presence of a carotid plaque. Mendelian randomization analyses using known genetic variants for BMI and SUA confirmed that BMI is causally linked to SUA and that BMI is a significant confounder in the association between SUA and cIMT.
SUA is associated with cardiovascular risk markers in young adults, especially BMI, but we found no evidence that SUA would have an independent role in the pathophysiology of early atherosclerosis.
PubMed ID
22749515 View in PubMed
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Cardiovascular risk scores in the prediction of subclinical atherosclerosis in young adults: evidence from the cardiovascular risk in a young Finns study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature144567
Source
Eur J Cardiovasc Prev Rehabil. 2010 Oct;17(5):549-55
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2010
Author
Juho R H Raiko
Costan G Magnussen
Mika Kivimäki
Leena Taittonen
Tomi Laitinen
Mika Kähönen
Nina Hutri-Kähönen
Antti Jula
Britt-Marie Loo
Russell J Thomson
Terho Lehtimäki
Jorma S A Viikari
Olli T Raitakari
Markus Juonala
Author Affiliation
Research Center of Applied and Preventive Cardiovascular Medicine, University of Turku and Turku University Hospital dFinnish Institute of Occupational Health, Helsinki, Finland. juho.raiko@utu.fi
Source
Eur J Cardiovasc Prev Rehabil. 2010 Oct;17(5):549-55
Date
Oct-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Asymptomatic Diseases
Atherosclerosis - diagnosis - etiology - physiopathology - ultrasonography
Brachial Artery - physiopathology - ultrasonography
Cardiovascular Diseases - etiology
Carotid Arteries - ultrasonography
Carotid Artery, Common - physiopathology - ultrasonography
Elasticity
Finland
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Logistic Models
Predictive value of tests
Risk assessment
Risk factors
Time Factors
Tunica Intima - ultrasonography
Tunica Media - ultrasonography
Vasodilation
Young Adult
Abstract
To study the utility of risk scores in the prediction of subclinical atherosclerosis in young adults.
Participants were 2204 healthy Finnish adults aged 24-39 years in 2001 from a population-based follow-up study Cardiovascular Risk in Young Finns. We examined the performance of the Framingham, Reynolds, Systematic Coronary Risk Evaluation (SCORE), PROCAM, and Finrisk cardiovascular risk scores to predict subclinical atherosclerosis, that is carotid artery intima-media thickness (IMT) and plaque, carotid artery distensibility (CDist), and brachial artery flow-mediated dilatation (FMD) 6 years later. In a 6-year prediction of high IMT (highest decile or plaque), areas under the receiver operating characteristic curves (AUC) for baseline Finrisk (0.733), SCORE (0.726), PROCAM (0.712), and Reynolds (0.729) risk scores were similar as for Framingham risk score (0.728, P always =0.15). All risk scores had a similar discrimination in predicting low CDist (lowest decile) (0.652, 0.642, 0.639, 0.658, 0.652 respectively, P always =0.41). In the prediction of low FMD (lowest decile), Finrisk, PROCAM, Reynolds, and Framingham scores had similar AUCs (0.578, 0.594, 0.582, 0.568, P always =0.08) and SCORE discriminated slightly better (AUC=0.596, P
Notes
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PubMed ID
20354441 View in PubMed
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Childhood physical, environmental, and genetic predictors of adult hypertension: the cardiovascular risk in young Finns study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature123225
Source
Circulation. 2012 Jul 24;126(4):402-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-24-2012
Author
Jonna Juhola
Mervi Oikonen
Costan G Magnussen
Vera Mikkilä
Niina Siitonen
Eero Jokinen
Tomi Laitinen
Peter Würtz
Samuel S Gidding
Leena Taittonen
Ilkka Seppälä
Antti Jula
Mika Kähönen
Nina Hutri-Kähönen
Terho Lehtimäki
Jorma S A Viikari
Markus Juonala
Olli T Raitakari
Author Affiliation
Research Centre of Applied and Preventive Cardiovascular Medicine, University of Turku, Kiinamyllynkatu 10, FI-20520 Turku, Finland. jopasi@utu.fi
Source
Circulation. 2012 Jul 24;126(4):402-9
Date
Jul-24-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Blood Pressure - genetics
Cardiovascular Diseases - epidemiology - ethnology - etiology
Cohort Studies
Female
Finland
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Hypertension - epidemiology - ethnology - etiology
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Middle Aged
Obesity - complications - ethnology - genetics
Overweight - complications - ethnology - genetics
Pedigree
Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide - genetics
Predictive value of tests
Prospective Studies
Risk assessment
Risk factors
Social Class
Abstract
Hypertension is a major modifiable cardiovascular risk factor. The present longitudinal study aimed to examine the best combination of childhood physical and environmental factors to predict adult hypertension and furthermore whether newly identified genetic variants for blood pressure increase the prediction of adult hypertension.
The study cohort included 2625 individuals from the Cardiovascular Risk in Young Finns Study who were followed up for 21 to 27 years since baseline (1980; age, 3-18 years). In addition to dietary factors and biomarkers related to blood pressure, we examined whether a genetic risk score based on 29 newly identified single-nucleotide polymorphisms enhances the prediction of adult hypertension. Hypertension in adulthood was defined as systolic blood pressure = 130 mm Hg and/or diastolic blood pressure = 85 mm Hg or medication for the condition. Independent childhood risk factors for adult hypertension included the individual's own blood pressure (P
PubMed ID
22718800 View in PubMed
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Early childhood hospitalisation with infection and subclinical atherosclerosis in adulthood: the Cardiovascular Risk in Young Finns Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature268310
Source
Atherosclerosis. 2015 Apr;239(2):496-502
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2015
Author
David P Burgner
Matthew A Sabin
Costan G Magnussen
Michael Cheung
Cong Sun
Mika Kähönen
Nina Hutri-Kähönen
Terho Lehtimäki
Eero Jokinen
Tomi Laitinen
Jorma S A Viikari
Olli T Raitakari
Markus Juonala
Source
Atherosclerosis. 2015 Apr;239(2):496-502
Date
Apr-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age of Onset
Arginine - analogs & derivatives - blood
Asymptomatic Diseases
Biomarkers - blood
Brachial Artery - physiopathology - ultrasonography
Carotid Arteries - physiopathology - ultrasonography
Carotid Artery Diseases - diagnosis - epidemiology - physiopathology
Carotid Intima-Media Thickness
Child
Child, Preschool
Communicable Diseases - diagnosis - epidemiology - therapy
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Hospitalization
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Phenotype
Prognosis
Prospective Studies
Risk assessment
Risk factors
Severity of Illness Index
Time Factors
Vascular Stiffness
Vasodilation
Young Adult
Abstract
Most infections occur in pre-school children but the severity of the inflammatory response to common pathogens varies considerably. We examined the relationship between early childhood infections of sufficient severity to warrant hospitalisation, and markers of subclinical atherosclerosis in adulthood.
We investigated whether infection-related hospitalisation (IRH) in early childhood (0-5 years) was associated with adverse non-invasive phenotypes of atherosclerosis (carotid artery distensibility and intima-media thickness (IMT), and brachial artery flow-mediated dilation (FMD)) in adulthood in participants from the Cardiovascular Risk in Young Finns study. Analyses were adjusted for age, sex, and socioeconomic status and cardiovascular risk factors in childhood and adulthood. 1043 participants had lifetime IRH data with a mean age at adult follow-up of 33 years.
Brachial FMD levels were significantly lower among individuals with early child IRH (mean ± SEM 8.15 ± 0.37 vs. 9.10 ± 0.16%, p = 0.03). These individuals had a 1.84% (95% CI 0.64-3.04, p = 0.002) greater decrease in FMD over a 6-year interval between two adult follow-ups at mean ages 27 and 33 years. Childhood IRH was associated with increased asymmetrical dimethylarginine (ADMA) in adulthood (0.62 ± 0.01 vs. 0.59 ± 0.01 µmol/l, p = 0.04), adjusted for age, sex, adult body mass index, and serum creatinine. Early childhood IRH was associated with lower carotid distensibility levels (1.95 ± 0.06 vs. 2.09 ± 0.02%/10 mmHg, p = 0.02), but not with carotid intima-media thickness (0.601 ± 0.006 vs. 0.596 ± 0.003 mm). All findings remained unchanged after adjustments for age, sex and conventional cardiovascular risk factors in childhood or adulthood.
Infection-related hospitalisation in the pre-school period was associated with adverse adult atherosclerotic phenotypes and increased ADMA. Infection may contribute to causal pathways leading to the development of endothelial dysfunction and early atherosclerosis.
PubMed ID
25721701 View in PubMed
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25 records – page 1 of 3.