Skip header and navigation

Refine By

1342 records – page 1 of 135.

A 3-year follow-up of headache diagnoses and symptoms in Swedish schoolchildren.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature81846
Source
Cephalalgia. 2006 Jul;26(7):809-15
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2006
Author
Laurell K.
Larsson B.
Mattsson P.
Eeg-Olofsson O.
Author Affiliation
Department of Neuroscience, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden. katarina.laurell@akademiska.se
Source
Cephalalgia. 2006 Jul;26(7):809-15
Date
Jul-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Child
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Incidence
Male
Migraine Disorders - diagnosis - epidemiology
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Prognosis
Questionnaires
Risk Assessment - methods
Risk factors
Sex Distribution
Students - statistics & numerical data
Sweden - epidemiology
Tension-Type Headache - diagnosis - epidemiology
Abstract
Information is sparse concerning the incidence and prognosis of headache in children from the general population, especially of tension-type headache. In this study, headache diagnoses and symptoms were reassessed in 122 out of 130 schoolchildren after 3 years. Nearly 80% of those with headache at first evaluation still reported headache at follow-up. Although the likelihood of experiencing the same headache diagnosis and symptoms was high, about one-fifth of children with tension-type headache developed migraine and vice versa. Female gender predicted migraine and frequent headache episodes predicted overall headache at follow-up. The estimated average annual incidence was 81 and 65 per 1000 children, for tension-type headache and migraine, respectively. We conclude that there is a considerable risk of developing and maintaining headache during childhood. Headache diagnoses should be reassessed regularly and treatment adjusted. Girls and children with frequent headache have a poorer prognosis and therefore intervention is particularly important in these groups.
PubMed ID
16776695 View in PubMed
Less detail

6TH NORWEGIAN ENVIRONMENTAL TOXICOLOGY SYMPOSIUM: Assessing and solving environmental challenges in a multiple stressor world.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature296704
Source
J Toxicol Environ Health A. 2017; 80(16-18):805-806
Publication Type
Introductory Journal Article
Date
2017
Author
Knut Erik Tollefsen
Sam Kacew
Author Affiliation
a Section for Ecotoxicology and Risk Assessment, Norwegian Institute for Water Research (NIVA) , Oslo , Norway.
Source
J Toxicol Environ Health A. 2017; 80(16-18):805-806
Date
2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Introductory Journal Article
Keywords
Ecotoxicology
Environmental Exposure
Environmental Monitoring - methods
Environmental Pollutants - toxicity
Norway
Risk Assessment - methods
PubMed ID
28829685 View in PubMed
Less detail

A 15-year prospective study of shift work and disability pension.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature93753
Source
Occup Environ Med. 2008 Apr;65(4):283-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2008
Author
Tüchsen F.
Christensen K B
Lund T.
Feveile H.
Author Affiliation
National Research Centre for the Working Environment, Lersø Parkallé 105, DK-2100 Copenhagen Ø, Denmark. ftu@nrcwe.dk
Source
Occup Environ Med. 2008 Apr;65(4):283-5
Date
Apr-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Denmark - epidemiology
Disabled persons - statistics & numerical data
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Occupational Diseases - epidemiology - etiology
Occupational Health - statistics & numerical data
Pensions - statistics & numerical data
Prospective Studies
Retirement
Risk Assessment - methods
Sex Factors
Work Schedule Tolerance
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To estimate the hazard ratio for disability pension associated with shift work. METHODS: Cohorts of shift and day workers were identified in three waves of the Danish Work Environment Cohort Study and followed up for incidence of disability pension in a national register of social transfer payment. A total of 3980 female and 4025 male employees were included in the cohorts. Information about shift work status, age, smoking habits, body mass index and ergonomic work environment were updated according to responses in subsequent waves of the survey when possible. Respondents reporting shift work were classified as shift workers in the following waves as well. Respondents were followed in the register from the time of first interview and were censored at the time of their 60th birthday, emigration, death or end of follow-up (18 June 2006). The authors used the Cox proportional hazards model to estimate hazard ratios for incidence of disability pension and 95% confidence intervals. RESULTS: The authors observed 253 new disability pensions among women and 173 among men during 56 903 and 57 886 person-years at risk respectively, Among women, shift work predicted disability after adjustment for age, general health and socioeconomic status HR 1.39 (95% CI 1.07 to 1.82). After further adjustment for body mass index, smoking habits, socioeconomic status and ergonomic exposures the association remained statistically significant HR 1.34 (95% CI 1.02 to 1.75). Shift work was not associated with disability among men. CONCLUSION: Shift work might be moderately associated with disability pension among women; however, more powerful studies are needed to establish the possible association.
PubMed ID
18198201 View in PubMed
Less detail

40-Year CHD Mortality Trends and the Role of Risk Factors in Mortality Decline: The North Karelia Project Experience.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature289324
Source
Glob Heart. 2016 06; 11(2):207-12
Publication Type
Journal Article
Review
Date
06-2016
Author
Pekka Jousilahti
Tiina Laatikainen
Veikko Salomaa
Arto Pietilä
Erkki Vartiainen
Pekka Puska
Author Affiliation
National Institute for Health and Welfare, Department of Health, Helsinki, Finland. Electronic address: pekka.jousilahti@thl.fi.
Source
Glob Heart. 2016 06; 11(2):207-12
Date
06-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Review
Keywords
Cardiovascular Diseases - mortality - prevention & control
Finland - epidemiology
Forecasting
Public Health
Risk Assessment - methods
Risk factors
Survival Rate - trends
Abstract
In the 1960s and early 1970s, coronary heart disease (CHD) mortality in Finland was the highest in the world, and within Finland, mortality was particularly high in the eastern part of the country. The North Karelia Project, the first large community-based cardiovascular diseases prevention program was established in 1972 to reduce the extremely high CHD mortality through behavioral change and reduction of the main cardiovascular disease risk factors among the whole population of North Karelia, the easternmost province of Finland. During the 40-year period from 1972 to 2012, smoking prevalence, serum total cholesterol, and systolic blood pressure declined markedly, except a small increase in serum cholesterol levels between 2007 and 2012. From the early 1970s to 2012, CHD mortality decreased by 82% (from 643 to 118 per 100,000) among working-age (35 to 64 years) men. Among working-age women, the decline was 84% (from 114 to 17 per 100,000). During the first 10 years, changes in these 3 target risk factors explained nearly all of the observed mortality reduction. Since the mid-1980s, the observed reduction in mortality has been larger than the predicted reduction. In the early 1970s, premature CHD mortality (35 to 74 years) was about 37% higher among Eastern Finnish men and 23% higher among Eastern Finnish women, compared with men and women in Southwestern Finland. During the last 40 years, premature CHD mortality declined markedly in both areas, but the decline was larger in Eastern Finland and the mortality gap between the two areas nearly disappeared.
PubMed ID
27242088 View in PubMed
Less detail

The 2008 Canadian Hypertension Education Program recommendations for the management of hypertension: Part 1 - blood pressure measurement, diagnosis and assessment of risk.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature156767
Source
Can J Cardiol. 2008 Jun;24(6):455-63
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2008
Author
Raj S Padwal
Brenda R Hemmelgarn
Nadia A Khan
Steven Grover
Finlay A McAlister
Donald W McKay
Thomas Wilson
Brian Penner
Ellen Burgess
Peter Bolli
Michael D Hill
Jeff Mahon
Martin G Myers
Carl Abbott
Ernesto L Schiffrin
George Honos
Karen Mann
Guy Tremblay
Alain Milot
Lyne Cloutier
Arun Chockalingam
Simon W Rabkin
Martin Dawes Dawes
Rhian M Touyz
Chaim Bell
Kevin D Burns
Marcel Ruzicka
Norman R C Campbell
Marcel Lebel
Sheldon W Tobe
Author Affiliation
Division of General Internal Medicine, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Canada. rpadwal@ualberta.ca
Source
Can J Cardiol. 2008 Jun;24(6):455-63
Date
Jun-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Antihypertensive Agents - therapeutic use
Blood Pressure - physiology
Blood Pressure Determination - standards
Canada
Clinical Competence
Diagnosis, Differential
Education, Medical, Continuing - standards
Humans
Hypertension - diagnosis - drug therapy - physiopathology
Practice Guidelines as Topic
Program Evaluation - trends
Risk Assessment - methods
Abstract
To provide updated, evidence-based recommendations for the diagnosis and assessment of adults with hypertension.
The diagnosis of hypertension is dependent on appropriate blood pressure measurement, the timely assessment of serially elevated readings, degree of blood pressure elevation, method of measurement (office, ambulatory, home) and associated comorbidities. The presence of cardiovascular risk factors and target organ damage should be ascertained to assess global cardiovascular risk and determine the urgency, intensity and type of treatment required.
MEDLINE searches were conducted from November 2006 to October 2007 with the aid of a medical librarian. Reference lists were scanned, experts were contacted, and the personal files of authors and subgroup members were used to identify additional studies. Content and methodological experts assessed studies using prespecified, standardized evidence-based algorithms. Recommendations were based on evidence from peer-reviewed, full-text articles only.
Recommendations for blood pressure measurement, criteria for hypertension diagnosis and follow-up, assessment of global cardiovascular risk, diagnostic testing, diagnosis of renovascular and endocrine causes of hypertension, home and ambulatory monitoring, and the use of echocardiography in hypertensive individuals are outlined. Key messages in 2008 include continued emphasis on the expedited, accurate diagnosis of hypertension, the importance of global risk assessment and the need for ongoing monitoring of hypertensive patients to identify incident type 2 diabetes.
All recommendations were graded according to strength of the evidence and voted on by the 57 members of the Canadian Hypertension Education Program Evidence-Based Recommendations Task Force. All recommendations reported here received at least 70% consensus. These guidelines will continue to be updated annually.
Notes
Cites: Am Heart J. 2000 Feb;139(2 Pt 1):272-8110650300
Cites: Arch Intern Med. 2007 Nov 26;167(21):2296-30318039987
Cites: Clin Radiol. 2000 May;55(5):346-5310816399
Cites: Can J Cardiol. 2000 Sep;16(9):1094-10211021953
Cites: JAMA. 2001 Jul 11;286(2):180-711448281
Cites: Clin Sci (Lond). 2001 Dec;101(6):671-911724655
Cites: Stroke. 2002 Jul;33(7):1776-8112105351
Cites: Lancet. 2002 Dec 14;360(9349):1903-1312493255
Cites: Lancet. 2003 Apr 5;361(9364):1149-5812686036
Cites: Eur Heart J. 2003 Jun;24(11):987-100312788299
Cites: Lancet. 2003 Nov 29;362(9398):1776-714654312
Cites: Diabetes Care. 2004 Jan;27(1):247-5514693997
Cites: Hypertension. 2004 Jan;43(1):10-714638619
Cites: Hypertension. 2004 May;43(5):963-915037557
Cites: Lancet. 2004 Sep 11-17;364(9438):937-5215364185
Cites: Circulation. 1991 Jan;83(1):356-621984895
Cites: JAMA. 1996 May 22-29;275(20):1571-68622248
Cites: Arch Intern Med. 1996 Jul 8;156(13):1414-208678709
Cites: Arch Intern Med. 1998 Mar 23;158(6):655-629521231
Cites: Am J Cardiol. 2005 Jan 1;95(1):29-3515619390
Cites: Can J Cardiol. 2005 Jun;21(8):645-5616003448
Cites: Can J Cardiol. 2006 May 15;22(7):559-6416755310
Cites: Can J Cardiol. 2006 May 15;22(7):573-8116755312
Cites: Can J Cardiol. 2006 May 15;22(7):606-1316755316
Cites: Hypertension. 2006 Aug;48(2):219-2416801488
Cites: N Engl J Med. 2006 Oct 12;355(15):1551-6216980380
Cites: Arch Intern Med. 2006 Nov 13;166(20):2191-20117101936
Cites: Lancet. 2007 Jan 20;369(9557):201-717240286
Cites: AJR Am J Roentgenol. 2007 Mar;188(3):798-81117312071
Cites: Can J Cardiol. 2007 May 15;23(7):529-3817534459
Cites: Can J Cardiol. 2007 May 15;23(7):539-5017534460
Cites: J Hypertens. 2007 Jun;25(6):1311-717563546
Cites: Kidney Int. 2007 Aug;72(3):260-417507905
Cites: Hypertension. 2007 Sep;50(3):467-7317679652
Cites: N Engl J Med. 2000 Mar 30;342(13):905-1210738048
PubMed ID
18548142 View in PubMed
Less detail

2009 Canadian Cardiovascular Society/Canadian guidelines for the diagnosis and treatment of dyslipidemia and prevention of cardiovascular disease in the adult - 2009 recommendations.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature148105
Source
Can J Cardiol. 2009 Oct;25(10):567-79
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2009
Author
Jacques Genest
Ruth McPherson
Jiri Frohlich
Todd Anderson
Norm Campbell
André Carpentier
Patrick Couture
Robert Dufour
George Fodor
Gordon A Francis
Steven Grover
Milan Gupta
Robert A Hegele
David C Lau
Lawrence Leiter
Gary F Lewis
Eva Lonn
G B John Mancini
Dominic Ng
Glen J Pearson
Allan Sniderman
James A Stone
Ehud Ur
Author Affiliation
McGill University Health Centre, Montreal, Canada. jacques.genest@muhc.mcgill.ca
Source
Can J Cardiol. 2009 Oct;25(10):567-79
Date
Oct-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Canada
Cardiovascular Diseases - etiology - prevention & control
Congresses as topic
Diagnostic Techniques, Cardiovascular
Dyslipidemias - complications - diagnosis - drug therapy
Humans
Hypolipidemic Agents - therapeutic use
Practice Guidelines as Topic - standards
Risk Assessment - methods
Societies, Medical
Abstract
The present article represents the 2009 update of the Canadian Cardiovascular Society guidelines for the diagnosis and treatment of dyslipidemia and prevention of cardiovascular disease in the adult.
Notes
Cites: Lancet. 2005 Nov 26;366(9500):1849-6116310551
Cites: Am Heart J. 2005 Dec;150(6):1276-8116338271
Cites: CMAJ. 2006 Jan 17;174(2):156-716415457
Cites: J Intern Med. 2006 Mar;259(3):247-5816476102
Cites: Circulation. 2006 Mar 21;113(11):1406-1416534008
Cites: N Engl J Med. 2006 Apr 13;354(15):1567-7716531613
Cites: Circulation. 2006 May 16;113(19):2363-7216702489
Cites: Can J Cardiol. 2006 Sep;22(11):913-2716971976
Cites: Am J Med. 2006 Oct;119(10):812-917000207
Cites: Am J Cardiol. 2008 Apr 17;101(8A):58B-62B18375243
Cites: JAMA. 2008 Jun 4;299(21):2524-3218523221
Cites: Am J Cardiol. 2008 Jun 16;101(12A):51F-57F18549872
Cites: JAMA. 2008 Jul 9;300(2):197-20818612117
Cites: Circulation. 2008 Oct 21;118(17):1768-7518824640
Cites: Am J Cardiol. 2008 Nov 15;102(10):1312-718993147
Cites: Am J Cardiol. 2008 Nov 15;102(10):1341-718993152
Cites: N Engl J Med. 2008 Nov 20;359(21):2195-20718997196
Cites: Circulation. 2008 Nov 25;118(22):2243-51, 4p following 225118997194
Cites: N Engl J Med. 2008 Nov 27;359(22):2324-3619038879
Cites: Curr Opin Lipidol. 2006 Dec;17(6):619-2517095905
Cites: Nature. 2006 Dec 14;444(7121):881-717167477
Cites: Circulation. 2007 Jan 23;115(3):402-2617220398
Cites: JAMA. 2007 Jan 24;297(4):367-7917244833
Cites: JAMA. 2007 Feb 7;297(5):499-50817284700
Cites: JAMA. 2007 Feb 14;297(6):611-917299196
Cites: Int J Circumpolar Health. 2006 Dec;65(5):389-40217319084
Cites: Am J Gastroenterol. 2007 Mar;102(3):662-717156143
Cites: N Engl J Med. 2007 Apr 26;356(17):1723-3517460226
Cites: Ann Intern Med. 2007 May 1;146(9):640-817470832
Cites: N Engl J Med. 2007 Jun 7;356(23):2388-9817554120
Cites: Eur J Cardiovasc Prev Rehabil. 2007 Sep;14 Suppl 2:S1-11317726407
Cites: Circulation. 2007 Sep 11;116(11):1306-1717846344
Cites: Am J Cardiol. 2007 Oct 1;100(7):1047-5117884359
Cites: N Engl J Med. 2007 Sep 27;357(13):1301-1017898099
Cites: N Engl J Med. 2007 Nov 22;357(21):2109-2217984165
Cites: Arch Intern Med. 2007 Nov 26;167(21):2296-30318039987
Cites: N Engl J Med. 2007 Nov 29;357(22):2248-6117984166
Cites: Clin Gastroenterol Hepatol. 2008 Jan;6(1):41-518063423
Cites: J Am Soc Echocardiogr. 2008 Feb;21(2):93-111; quiz 189-9018261694
Cites: Circulation. 2008 Feb 12;117(6):743-5318212285
Cites: Am J Cardiol. 2008 Nov 17;102(10 Suppl):1K-34K19068318
Cites: Lancet. 2002 Jul 6;360(9326):7-2212114036
Cites: Circulation. 2003 Jan 28;107(3):391-712551861
Cites: Lancet. 2003 Apr 5;361(9364):1149-5812686036
Cites: N Engl J Med. 2003 Jul 31;349(5):465-7312890846
Cites: Arthritis Rheum. 2003 Sep;48(9):2519-2313130471
Cites: Circulation. 2003 Oct 28;108(17):2154-6914581387
Cites: N Engl J Med. 2004 Apr 8;350(15):1495-50415007110
Cites: JAMA. 2004 May 12;291(18):2204-1115138242
Cites: Lancet. 2004 Sep 11-17;364(9438):937-5215364185
Cites: N Engl J Med. 2004 Sep 23;351(13):1296-30515385656
Cites: N Engl J Med. 1987 Nov 12;317(20):1237-453313041
Cites: N Engl J Med. 1995 Nov 16;333(20):1301-77566020
Cites: Curr Opin Lipidol. 1995 Dec;6(6):386-88750253
Cites: Circulation. 1998 Jan 20;97(2):155-609445167
Cites: Lancet. 2008 Oct 4;372(9645):1231-918757089
Cites: Am J Cardiol. 2009 Feb 1;103(3):350-419166688
Cites: Clin Chem. 2009 Feb;55(2):378-8419106185
Cites: Curr Diab Rep. 2009 Feb;9(1):37-4219192423
Cites: N Engl J Med. 2009 Feb 26;360(9):859-7319246357
Cites: N Engl J Med. 2009 Apr 2;360(14):1395-40719332456
Cites: Lancet. 2009 Apr 4;373(9670):1175-8219329177
Cites: Ann Rheum Dis. 2009 Jul;68(7):1131-518697777
Cites: Circulation. 2000 Sep 5;102(10):1082-510973834
Cites: Lancet. 2000 Jul 22;356(9226):279-8411071182
Cites: JAMA. 1998 May 27;279(20):1615-229613910
Cites: Arthritis Rheum. 1999 Feb;42(2):338-4610025929
Cites: N Engl J Med. 1999 Aug 5;341(6):410-810438259
Cites: N Engl J Med. 2005 Apr 7;352(14):1425-3515755765
Cites: JAMA. 2005 Jul 20;294(3):326-3316030277
Cites: N Engl J Med. 2005 Jul 21;353(3):238-4816034009
Cites: Lancet. 2005 Sep 24-30;366(9491):1059-6216182882
Cites: Lancet. 2005 Oct 8;366(9493):1267-7816214597
Cites: JAMA. 2005 Nov 16;294(19):2437-4516287954
PubMed ID
19812802 View in PubMed
Less detail

Abnormal glucose regulation and gender-specific risk of fatal coronary artery disease in the HUNT 1 study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature127351
Source
Scand Cardiovasc J. 2012 Aug;46(4):219-25
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2012
Author
Erik Madssen
Lars Vatten
Tom Ivar Nilsen
Kristian Midthjell
Rune Wiseth
Ane Cecilie Dale
Author Affiliation
Department of Circulation and Medical Imaging, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway.
Source
Scand Cardiovasc J. 2012 Aug;46(4):219-25
Date
Aug-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Blood Glucose - metabolism
Confidence Intervals
Coronary Artery Disease - epidemiology - metabolism - mortality
Diabetes Mellitus - metabolism
Female
Health Status Indicators
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Norway
Proportional Hazards Models
Prospective Studies
Registries
Risk Assessment - methods
Sex Factors
Abstract
To assess fatal coronary artery disease (CAD) by gender and glucose regulation status.
47,951 people were followed up according to fatal CAD identified in the National Cause of Death Registry. Gender-effects of fatal CAD in people with impaired glucose regulation (IGR), newly diagnosed diabetes (NDM) or known diabetes (KDM) compared with people with normal glucose regulation (NGR) were calculated using Cox regression.
Using NGR as reference, the hazard ratios (HR, 95% confidence intervals) associated with IGR was 1.2 (0.8-1.9) for women and 1.2 (0.9-1.6) for men. The corresponding HRs were 1.6 (1.2-2.2) and 1.4 (1.1.-1.9) for NDM, and 2.5 (2.1-2.8) and 1.8 (1.6-2.1) for KDM. The gender-difference in mortality varied by category (P(interaction) = 0.003). Using women as the reference, the HRs for men were 2.1 (2.0-2.3) for NGR, 1.8 (1.0-3.3) for IGR, 1.6 (1.0-2.5) for NDM, and 1.2 (1.0-1.5) for KDM.
Diabetes mellitus, but not IGR, was associated with fatal CAD in both genders. The known gender-difference in CAD mortality was attenuated in people with abnormal glucose regulation, evident already in people with IGR.
PubMed ID
22303857 View in PubMed
Less detail

Abuse and neglect experienced by aging chinese in Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature130694
Source
J Elder Abuse Negl. 2011 Oct;23(4):326-47
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2011
Author
Daniel W L Lai
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Social Work, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta, Canada. dlai@ucalgary.ca
Source
J Elder Abuse Negl. 2011 Oct;23(4):326-47
Date
Oct-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Asian Continental Ancestry Group
Canada - epidemiology
Cross-Sectional Studies
Elder Abuse - ethnology
Female
Geriatric Assessment - methods
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Questionnaires
Retrospective Studies
Risk Assessment - methods
Risk factors
Social Environment
Vulnerable Populations - ethnology - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
The traditional values of Chinese culture promote care and respect toward older adults. While it appears to be ironic to discuss issues of abuse and neglect in the Chinese culture, research findings in Chinese societies do indicate the occurrences of such problems. However, little research on the abuse and neglect of older Chinese in Western societies has been available. This study aims to examine the incidence of abuse and neglect and the associated correlates based on data collected from a random sample of 2,272 aging Chinese 55 years and older in seven Canadian cities. The findings show that 4.5% of the participants reported experiencing at least one incident of maltreatment or neglect within the past year. The most common forms of neglect and abuse experienced by the aging Chinese include being scolded, yelled at, treated impolitely all the time, and ridiculed. Close family members such as spouses and sons are those that most commonly maltreat older Chinese. Those who were more likely to report at least one incident of maltreatment or neglect were older adults living with others; they tended to have no education, more access barriers, more chronic illnesses, less favorable mental health, and a higher level of identification with Chinese cultural values. The findings implied that the face value of respect and care received by older people in Chinese culture should not be taken for granted. Culturally appropriate precautionary steps are needed for prevention and early problem identification.
PubMed ID
21978291 View in PubMed
Less detail

Accumulation of Major Life Events in Childhood and Adult Life and Risk of Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature273707
Source
PLoS One. 2015;10(9):e0138654
Publication Type
Article
Date
2015
Author
Jolene Masters Pedersen
Naja Hulvej Rod
Ingelise Andersen
Theis Lange
Gry Poulsen
Eva Prescott
Rikke Lund
Source
PLoS One. 2015;10(9):e0138654
Date
2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Denmark - epidemiology
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 - epidemiology - etiology
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Life Change Events
Logistic Models
Male
Middle Aged
Multivariate Analysis
Risk Assessment - methods - statistics & numerical data
Risk factors
Stress, Psychological - complications
Surveys and Questionnaires
Time Factors
Young Adult
Abstract
The aim of the study was to estimate the effect of the accumulation of major life events (MLE) in childhood and adulthood, in both the private and working domains, on risk of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Furthermore, we aimed to test the possible interaction between childhood and adult MLE and to investigate modification of these associations by educational attainment.
The study was based on 4,761 participants from the Copenhagen City Heart Study free of diabetes at baseline and followed for 10 years. MLE were categorized as 0, 1, 2, 3 or more events. Multivariate logistic regression models adjusted for age, sex, education and family history of diabetes were used to estimate the association between MLE and T2DM.
In childhood, experiencing 3 or more MLE was associated with a 69% higher risk of developing T2DM (Odds Ratio (OR) 1.69; 95% Confidence Interval (CI) 1.60, 3.27). The accumulation of MLE in adult private (p-trend = 0.016) and work life (p-trend = 0.049) was associated with risk of T2DM in a dose response manner. There was no evidence that experiencing MLE in both childhood and adult life was more strongly associated with T2DM than experiencing events at only one time point. There was some evidence that being simultaneously exposed to childhood MLE and short education (OR 2.28; 95% C.I. 1.45, 3.59) and work MLE and short education (OR 2.86; 95% C.I. 1.62, 5.03) was associated with higher risk of T2DM, as the joint effects were greater than the sum of their individual effects.
Findings from this study suggest that the accumulation of MLE in childhood, private adult life and work life, respectively, are risk factors for developing T2DM.
Notes
Cites: Psychol Med. 2004 Apr;34(3):509-2015259836
Cites: Psychoneuroendocrinology. 2005 Jan;30(1):1-1015358437
Cites: Acta Psychiatr Scand Suppl. 2003;(418):61-612956817
Cites: Arch Intern Med. 2004 Sep 27;164(17):1873-8015451762
Cites: J Psychosom Res. 1967 Aug;11(2):213-86059863
Cites: Soc Sci Med. 1987;25(6):567-783317881
Cites: J Health Soc Behav. 1990 Jun;31(2):162-722102495
Cites: Epidemiology. 1992 Sep;3(5):452-61391139
Cites: J Clin Epidemiol. 1996 Dec;49(12):1407-178970491
Cites: Epidemiology. 1999 Jan;10(1):37-489888278
Cites: Ann N Y Acad Sci. 2004 Dec;1032:276-815677427
Cites: J Epidemiol Community Health. 2006 Jan;60(1):7-1216361448
Cites: Ann Intern Med. 2007 Oct 16;147(8):W163-9417938389
Cites: Pediatrics. 2008 May;121(5):e1240-918450866
Cites: Diabet Med. 2008 Jul;25(7):834-4218513304
Cites: Diabet Med. 2008 Oct;25(10):1211-719046200
Cites: Ann Med. 2009;41(1):66-7218720095
Cites: J Intern Med. 2009 Nov;266(5):467-7519570055
Cites: Discov Med. 2010 Feb;9(45):112-820193636
Cites: Endocrinol Metab Clin North Am. 2010 Sep;39(3):481-9720723815
Cites: Am J Prev Med. 2010 Dec;39(6):529-3621084073
Cites: Int J Epidemiol. 2011 Aug;40(4):904-1321441553
Cites: Curr Psychiatry Rep. 2012 Feb;14(1):8-1422094982
Cites: Physiol Behav. 2012 Apr 12;106(1):29-3921888923
Cites: Gen Hosp Psychiatry. 2014 Jan-Feb;36(1):26-3224183489
Cites: Eur J Public Health. 2014 Feb;24(1):57-6223397581
Cites: Diabetes Care. 2000 Feb;23(2):197-20110868831
Cites: Scand Cardiovasc J. 2001 Jul;35(3):172-711515689
Cites: J Aging Health. 2002 Nov;14(4):467-9412392001
PubMed ID
26394040 View in PubMed
Less detail

1342 records – page 1 of 135.