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46177 records – page 1 of 4618.

[Make risk changes and clinical significance tangible!].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature214531
Source
Lakartidningen. 1995 Aug 23;92(34):2979
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-23-1995
Author
G. Akner
Source
Lakartidningen. 1995 Aug 23;92(34):2979
Date
Aug-23-1995
Language
Swedish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Humans
Morbidity
Risk
Risk factors
Sweden
Notes
Comment On: Lakartidningen. 1995 Mar 29;92(13):1325-6, 13297707776
PubMed ID
7650978 View in PubMed
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Institutionalized ignorance as a precondition for rational risk expertise.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature137417
Source
Risk Anal. 2011 Jul;31(7):1083-94
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2011
Author
Henrik Merkelsen
Author Affiliation
Copenhagen Business School, Frederiksberg, Denmark. hm.ikk@cbs.dk
Source
Risk Anal. 2011 Jul;31(7):1083-94
Date
Jul-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Algorithms
Denmark
Food Handling
Food Safety
Humans
Knowledge
Male
Models, Statistical
Perception
Risk
Risk Assessment - methods
Risk factors
Risk Management
Social Class
Trust
Abstract
The present case study seeks to explain the conditions for experts' rational risk perception by analyzing the institutional contexts that constitute a field of food safety expertise in Denmark. The study highlights the role of risk reporting and how contextual factors affect risk reporting from the lowest organizational level, where concrete risks occur, to the highest organizational level, where the body of professional risk expertise is situated. The article emphasizes the role of knowledge, responsibility, loyalty, and trust as risk-attenuation factors and concludes by suggesting that the preconditions for the expert's rationality may rather be a lack of risk-specific knowledge due to poor risk reporting than a superior level of risk knowledge.
PubMed ID
21284683 View in PubMed
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Cardiovascular diseases in the Republic of Sakha (Yakutia): status of the problem in the light of scientific research results.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature84165
Source
Pages 48-50 in N. Murphy and S. Krivoschekov, eds. Circumpolar Health 2006: Gateway to the International Polar Year. Proceedings of the 13th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Novosibirsk, Russia, 2006. Alaska Medicine. 2007;49 (2 Suppl):48-50
Publication Type
Article
Date
2007
, dynamics of risk factors of cardiovascular diseases and their contribution to mortality rate in the male population of Yakutsk are analyzed according to the results of standardized epidemiological researches carried out in the period of 1986-2005. It was revealed that the unfavourable cardiovascular
  1 document  
Author
Krivoshapkin, V.G.
Alexeev, V.P.
Klimova, T.M.
Author Affiliation
Institute of Health of the Republic of Sakha (Yakutia) Academy of Sciences, Yakutsk, Russia
Source
Pages 48-50 in N. Murphy and S. Krivoschekov, eds. Circumpolar Health 2006: Gateway to the International Polar Year. Proceedings of the 13th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Novosibirsk, Russia, 2006. Alaska Medicine. 2007;49 (2 Suppl):48-50
Date
2007
Language
English
Geographic Location
Russia
Publication Type
Article
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Physical Holding
University of Alaska Anchorage
Keywords
Cardiovascular diseases
Male population
Mortality
Relative risk
Risk factors
Abstract
In the paper, dynamics of risk factors of cardiovascular diseases and their contribution to mortality rate in the male population of Yakutsk are analyzed according to the results of standardized epidemiological researches carried out in the period of 1986-2005. It was revealed that the unfavourable cardiovascular epidemiologic situation in Yakutia is caused by the prevalence of such risk factors as smoking, excess body weight and arterial hypertension.
PubMed ID
17929609 View in PubMed
Documents
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Comparison of the ATRIA, CHADS2, and CHA2DS2-VASc stroke risk scores in predicting ischaemic stroke in a large Swedish cohort of patients with atrial fibrillation.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature291230
Source
Eur Heart J. 2016 Nov 07; 37(42):3203-3210
Publication Type
Comparative Study
Journal Article
Date
Nov-07-2016
Author
Sara Aspberg
Yuchiao Chang
Adriano Atterman
Matteo Bottai
Alan S Go
Daniel E Singer
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine, Danderyd Hospital, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden sara.aspberg@ds.se.
Source
Eur Heart J. 2016 Nov 07; 37(42):3203-3210
Date
Nov-07-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Comparative Study
Journal Article
Keywords
Atrial Fibrillation
Humans
Risk assessment
Risk factors
Stroke
Sweden
Abstract
Better stroke risk prediction is needed to optimize the anticoagulation decision in atrial fibrillation (AF). The ATRIA stroke risk score (ATRIA) was developed and validated in two large California community AF cohorts. We compared the performance of the ATRIA, CHADS2, and CHA2DS2-VASc scores in a national Swedish AF (SAF) cohort.
We examined all Swedish patients hospitalized, or visiting a hospital-based outpatient clinic, with a diagnosis of AF from July 2005 through December 2010. Variables were determined from comprehensive national databases. Risk scores were assessed via C-index (C) and net reclassification improvement (NRI). The cohort included 152 153 AF patients not receiving warfarin. Overall, 11 053 acute ischaemic strokes were observed with mean rate 3.2%/year, higher than the 2%/year in the California cohorts. Using entire point scores, ATRIA had a good C of 0.708 (0.704-0.713), significantly better than CHADS2 0.690 (0.685-0.695) or CHA2DS2-VASc 0.694 (0.690-0.700). Using published cut-points for low/moderate/high risk, C deteriorated but ATRIA remained superior. Net reclassification improvement favoured ATRIA 0.16 (0.14-0.17) vs. CHADS2 and 0.21 (0.20-0.23) vs. CHA2DS2-VASc. Net reclassification improvement decreased when cut-points were altered to better fit the cohort's stroke rates.
In this SAF cohort, the ATRIA score predicted ischaemic stroke risk better than CHADS2 or CHA2DS2-VASc. However, relative performance of the categorical scores varied by population stroke rates. Score cut-points may need to be optimized to better fit local population stroke rates.
PubMed ID
26941204 View in PubMed
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[How to measure the effect of risk reduction?].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature182097
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2003 Nov 20;123(22):3266
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-20-2003
Author
Torbjørn F Wisløff
Ivar Sønbø Kristiansen
Author Affiliation
Senter for medisinsk metodevurdering, SINTEF Unimed, Oslo. torbjorn.wisloff@sintef.no
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2003 Nov 20;123(22):3266
Date
Nov-20-2003
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Humans
Norway
Public Health
Risk factors
Risk Reduction Behavior
PubMed ID
14714029 View in PubMed
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Intake of selenium in the prevention of prostate cancer: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature172740
Source
Cancer Causes Control. 2005 Nov;16(9):1125-31
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2005
Author
Mahyar Etminan
J Mark FitzGerald
Martin Gleave
Keith Chambers
Author Affiliation
Division of Clinical Epidemiology, Royal Victoria Hospital, 1020 Pine Ave. West, Montreal, Quebec H3A1A2, Canada. metminan@shaw.ca
Source
Cancer Causes Control. 2005 Nov;16(9):1125-31
Date
Nov-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada - epidemiology
Chemoprevention
Humans
Male
Prostatic Neoplasms - epidemiology - prevention & control
Risk
Risk assessment
Risk factors
Selenium - pharmacology - therapeutic use
Abstract
Recent studies have suggested that selenium intake may prevent the risk of developing prostate cancer. Results from some of these studies have given conflicting results. Because of these discrepant results we sought to explore the association between selenium intake and prostate cancer by conducting a systematic review and meta-analysis of the literature.
We systematically searched MEDLINE, EMBASE and Cochrane Library between 1966 and May 2005 for articles that examined the association between intake of selenium and the risk of prostate cancer. We abstracted the data from relevant studies. A random effects model was used to estimate pooled relative risks for both cohort and case-control studies. Heterogeneity was assessed graphically using a Funnel Plot.
Sixteen studies (eleven cohort studies and five case-control studies) were included in the final analysis. The pooled relative risk of prostate cancer for any intake of selenium was 0.72 (0.61-0.84) for cohort studies and 0.74 (0.61-1.39) for case-control studies. The pooled relative risk of moderate intake was 0.74 (0.61-0.90) for cohort studies and 0.74 (0.39-1.39) for case-control studies. A dose-response trend was observed when we stratified the studies by disease severity.
The results of our systematic review suggest that selenium intake may reduce the risk of prostate cancer. The results confirm the need for large randomized controlled trials, which are ongoing, to answer this question.
PubMed ID
16184479 View in PubMed
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Recent developments in overall alcohol consumption and high risk drinking: a case for effective population level interventions in Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature155035
Source
Adicciones. 2008;20(3):207-19
Publication Type
Article
Date
2008
Author
Norman Giesbrecht
Author Affiliation
Social, Prevention and Health Policy Research Department, Centre for Addiction and Mental Health, 33 Russell Street, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. Norman_giesbrecht@camh.net
Source
Adicciones. 2008;20(3):207-19
Date
2008
Language
English
Spanish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alcohol Drinking - prevention & control
Canada
Humans
Risk factors
Risk-Taking
Abstract
There is growing evidence of extensive damage from alcohol to chronic disease, trauma, social problems and high economic costs. In a number of countries there has been an increase in consumption and/or high risk drinking in recent years. However, it appears that in many context alcohol management is not yet of high priority. Canada has experienced several developments in recent years: a gradual increase in overall consumption, an increase in high risk drinking, more extensive marketing and promotion of alcoholic beverages, and easier access to alcohol. Survey data for Canada, and for Ontario, the most populous province, indicate that the proportion drinking 5+ per occasion has increased since the mid-1990s. Overall, alcohol-related harm has been conservatively estimated to contribute to $14 billion to social costs using 2002 Canadian data. There are a national and several provincial-level alcohol strategies designed to reducing alcohol-related problems, but they are at the proposal, not full-scale implementation, stage. In order to generate effective, efficient and decisive action and reduce overall harm, several recommendations are highlighted: an increase in alcohol pricing/taxation, a ceiling on further access via controls on outlet density and hours of sale, a rejuvenation of the control functions of liquor boards, and the resources to effectively implementation these measures.
PubMed ID
18813768 View in PubMed
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[Risk as a concept and a challenge in health care].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature211031
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1996 Sep 20;116(22):2669-72
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-20-1996
Author
S. Graff-Iversen
Author Affiliation
Statens helseundersøkelser, Oslo.
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1996 Sep 20;116(22):2669-72
Date
Sep-20-1996
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Humans
Norway
Preventive Medicine
Risk
Risk assessment
Terminology as Topic
Abstract
In epidemiology and preventive medicine, absolute risk, relative risk and population attributable risk are well defined concepts. In research, the relative risks are of great interest, but to make medical decisions it is necessary to assess the risks and benefits in absolute rather than relative terms. Therefore, editors and referees should promote the presentation of absolute risks in medical journals. Critical comments on risk interventions are often of a general nature, and include all risk factors and all actual interventions. To assess the benefits, each disease, each risk, and each intervention has to be handled separately. In the prevention of cardiovascular diseases the effects of several interventions have been documented. The quality of the performance is of great importance, however, when interventions from clinical trials are applied in practical medicine.
PubMed ID
8928145 View in PubMed
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Dental caries risk studies revisited: causal approaches needed for future inquiries.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature146292
Source
Int J Environ Res Public Health. 2009 Dec;6(12):2992-3009
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2009
Author
Jolanta Aleksejuniene
Dorthe Holst
Vilma Brukiene
Author Affiliation
Department of Oral Health Sciences, Faculty of Dentistry, The University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, Canada. jolantaa@interchange.ubc.ca
Source
Int J Environ Res Public Health. 2009 Dec;6(12):2992-3009
Date
Dec-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
British Columbia - epidemiology
Causality
Dental Caries - epidemiology - etiology
Health Behavior
Humans
Models, Statistical
Oral Health
Risk assessment
Risk factors
Risk-Taking
Abstract
Prediction of high-risk individuals and the multi-risk approach are common inquiries in caries risk epidemiology. These studies prepared the ground for future studies; specific hypotheses about causal patterns can now be formulated and tested applying advanced statistical methods designed for causal studies, such as structural equation modeling, path analysis and multilevel modeling. Causal studies should employ measurements, analyses and interpretation of findings, which are in accordance to causal aims. Examples of causal empirical studies from medical and oral research are presented.
Notes
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PubMed ID
20049240 View in PubMed
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[All suicides are not due to treatment failure].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature271727
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2015 Aug 25;135(15):1342-3
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-25-2015
Author
Ewa Ness
Trude Fixdal
Johan L Torper
Inger Jakobsen
Arne Thomassen
Kari Aarøen
Bjørg Antonsen
Kari-Venke Lindkvist
Helga Skåden
Torgeir Vethe
Knut-Erik Hymer
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2015 Aug 25;135(15):1342-3
Date
Aug-25-2015
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Humans
Medical Errors
Norway
Risk assessment
Risk factors
Suicide - prevention & control
Notes
Comment In: Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2015 Oct 6;135(18):162526442723
Comment In: Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2015 Sep 22;135(17):153126394568
Comment In: Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2015 Sep 22;135(17):1531-226394569
PubMed ID
26315231 View in PubMed
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46177 records – page 1 of 4618.