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1467 records – page 1 of 147.

The 1st Annual Awards for Action on HIV/AIDS and Human Rights.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature182022
Source
Can HIV AIDS Policy Law Rev. 2002 Dec;7(2-3):1, 20-3
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2002
Author
Thomas Kerr
Thomas Haig
Source
Can HIV AIDS Policy Law Rev. 2002 Dec;7(2-3):1, 20-3
Date
Dec-2002
Language
English
French
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Awards and Prizes
Canada
HIV Infections
Human Rights
Humans
Physicians
Abstract
The 1st Annual Awards for Action on HIV/AIDS and Human Rights were awarded to the Vancouver Area Network of Drug Users and to Dr. Wan Yanhai, a Chinese physician and activist. The international attention and media coverage of the awards was heightened by the fact that the Chinese government had detained Dr. Wan for disclosing information about unsanitary blood collection practices in Henan province. An international outcry led to Dr. Wan's release on 20 September 2002.
PubMed ID
14719485 View in PubMed
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Source
Sygeplejersken. 1990 Mar 28;90(13):14-20
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-28-1990

[10 years after examination: she is manager, she works part-time. Interview by Marit Fonn].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature226680
Source
J Sykepleien. 1991 Mar 4;79(4):10-1
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-4-1991
Author
M. Hoel
Source
J Sykepleien. 1991 Mar 4;79(4):10-1
Date
Mar-4-1991
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Female
Humans
Norway
Salaries and Fringe Benefits
Women's Rights
Women, Working
PubMed ID
1859715 View in PubMed
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[20th century medical debate over venereal disease and prostitution].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature191749
Source
Sven Med Tidskr. 2001;5(1):29-44
Publication Type
Article
Date
2001
Author
A. Lundberg
Source
Sven Med Tidskr. 2001;5(1):29-44
Date
2001
Language
Swedish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Communicable Disease Control - history - legislation & jurisprudence
Female
History, 20th Century
Humans
Prostitution - history - legislation & jurisprudence
Sexually Transmitted Diseases - history
Social Welfare - history
Societies, Medical - history - legislation & jurisprudence
Sweden
Women's Rights - history
Abstract
In the early twentieth century a wider debate took place about how Swedish society was to fight the spread of contagious venereal diseases and in 1910 a government committee had written a law proposal that would dramatically reform these measures previously, Swedish physicians had been united against any measures against these diseases that did not involve the regulation of prostitutes, but this consensus was slowly withering away in the early parts of the century. Female doctors and a younger generation of venereologists was drawing the conclusion that mandatory checks of only one out of two sexes was insufficient. This article reviews the debate regarding the regulation of prostitution that took place between conservative and liberal members in the Swedish Medical Association in 1911. It depicts a fierce discussion between members that still clung to nineteenth-century ideas of women as being prone to prostitution if left idle and unemployed, and liberal members that believed social injustices such as low wages laid behind women's decisions. The study gives an insight into the complexities of building the Swedish welfare state.
PubMed ID
11817395 View in PubMed
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40 years after the first atrial switch procedure in patients with transposition of the great arteries: long-term results in Toronto and Zurich.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature197150
Source
Thorac Cardiovasc Surg. 2000 Aug;48(4):233-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2000
Author
E. Oechslin
R. Jenni
Author Affiliation
Division of Cardiology, University Hospital, Zurich, Switzerland. erwin.oechslin@dim.usz.ch
Source
Thorac Cardiovasc Surg. 2000 Aug;48(4):233-7
Date
Aug-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living
Actuarial Analysis
Adolescent
Adult
Analysis of Variance
Arrhythmias, Cardiac - etiology
Cause of Death
Death, Sudden, Cardiac - epidemiology - etiology
Echocardiography
Follow-Up Studies
Heart Failure - etiology - mortality
Humans
Ontario - epidemiology
Proportional Hazards Models
Quality of Life
Reoperation - statistics & numerical data
Severity of Illness Index
Survival Analysis
Switzerland - epidemiology
Time Factors
Transposition of Great Vessels - complications - mortality - psychology - surgery
Treatment Outcome
Ventricular Dysfunction, Right - etiology - mortality
Abstract
The atrial switch procedure dramatically improved the prognosis of children with complete transposition of the great arteries (TGA). Overall actuarial survival was approximately 75% after 25 years and was better in patients with simple TGA than in those with complex TGA. Mortality by any cause (16%) and cardiovascular mortality (12% and 13%) were comparable in both centers. Progressive congestive heart failure and sudden death were the principal modes of death. Most of the survivors denied any symptoms or had mild limitations in their daily activities. However, long-term problems in this growing population of adults are challenging and include late arrhythmias (up to two thirds of the patients), systemic ventricular (SV) failure, systemic atrioventricular valve regurgitation and reoperations, such as baffle reconstruction, being the most frequent. Objective assessment of SV function obtained by echocardiography is difficult. It may include fractional area change and tricuspid annular motion. Survivors after an atrial switch procedure are unique and have a good quality of life. However, the definitive and true history of the RV supporting the systemic circulation is not as yet known.
PubMed ID
11005599 View in PubMed
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1986 and beyond. A look into the future.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature236215
Source
Psychiatr Clin North Am. 1986 Dec;9(4):797-803
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1986
Author
C. Stavrakaki
B. Vargo
Source
Psychiatr Clin North Am. 1986 Dec;9(4):797-803
Date
Dec-1986
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Canada
Child
Criminal Law
Financing, Government
Human Rights
Humans
Intellectual Disability
Jurisprudence
Marriage
Social Justice
Sterilization
United States
Abstract
Recent research in the field of mental retardation has pointed to a better-defined population with exacting prevalence of the basic pathology and related disabilities. Advances in the areas of prevention and treatment have further reduced the prevalence and incidence of mental retardation. Current legislation and legislative procedures have led to a more equitable and fairer application of human rights to all citizens. However, discrepancies and ambiguities still remain with respect to interpretation of the spirit of the law as related to the retarded. Financial restraints and serious economic hardship have impacted on social and political attitudes and created two-tier systems of the rich and poor with the retarded referred to as "surplus population." This situation has, in turn, influenced the availability of resources, manpower, training, and research in this field. The future could be brighter if sociologic and philosophic changes parallel technologic advances. It is our duty and commitment to continue and further the developments in all spheres relevant to the retarded in order to maximize human potential whenever possible.
PubMed ID
3809000 View in PubMed
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Source
Inuit Circumpolar Conference (Canada). Ottawa, ON. 54 p.
Publication Type
Report
Source
Inuit Circumpolar Conference (Canada). Ottawa, ON. 54 p.
Language
English
Geographic Location
Canada
Greenland
Russia
U.S.
Publication Type
Report
Keywords
Alaska
Chukotka
Climate change
Arctic Council
Biodiversity
Human Rights
Environment
Sustainable development
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The ability of criminal law to produce gender equality: judicial discourses in the Swedish criminal legal system.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature98450
Source
Violence Against Women. 2010 Feb;16(2):173-88
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2010
Author
Monica Burman
Author Affiliation
Umeå University, Sweden. monica.burman@jus.umu.se
Source
Violence Against Women. 2010 Feb;16(2):173-88
Date
Feb-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Battered Women - legislation & jurisprudence
Community Networks - organization & administration
Crime Victims - legislation & jurisprudence
Criminal Law - legislation & jurisprudence
Female
Health Policy - legislation & jurisprudence
Humans
Interpersonal Relations
Male
Sex Factors
Spouse Abuse - legislation & jurisprudence - prevention & control - statistics & numerical data
Sweden
Value of Life
Women's Rights - legislation & jurisprudence
Abstract
The main aim of the Swedish Women's Peace reform in 1998 was to enhance criminal legal protection for women exposed to violence in heterosexual relationships and to promote gender equality. However, these ambitions risk being contravened in a masculinist criminal legal system. One problem concerns how the victim is constructed in criminal legal cases. The author argues that moral balancing and discourses of responsibility and guilt in Swedish cases constrain the agency possible for women and suggest that a more comprehensive policy in Sweden must be developed to include violent men, their agency, and their responsibility for the violence.
PubMed ID
20053946 View in PubMed
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Aboriginal urbanization and rights in Canada: examining implications for health.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature115712
Source
Soc Sci Med. 2013 Aug;91:219-28
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2013
Author
Laura C Senese
Kathi Wilson
Author Affiliation
Department of Geography & Program in Planning, University of Toronto, 100 St. George Street, Room 5047, Toronto, Ontario M5S 3G3, Canada. laura.senese@utoronto.ca
Source
Soc Sci Med. 2013 Aug;91:219-28
Date
Aug-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Attitude to Health - ethnology
Canada
Cultural Characteristics
Female
Health Status Disparities
Human Rights
Humans
Indians, North American - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Male
Middle Aged
Prejudice - ethnology
Qualitative Research
Urban Health - ethnology
Urbanization
Young Adult
Abstract
Urbanization among Indigenous peoples is growing globally. This has implications for the assertion of Indigenous rights in urban areas, as rights are largely tied to land bases that generally lie outside of urban areas. Through their impacts on the broader social determinants of health, the links between Indigenous rights and urbanization may be related to health. Focusing on a Canadian example, this study explores relationships between Indigenous rights and urbanization, and the ways in which they are implicated in the health of urban Indigenous peoples living in Toronto, Canada. In-depth interviews focused on conceptions of and access to Aboriginal rights in the city, and perceived links with health, were conduced with 36 Aboriginal people who had moved to Toronto from a rural/reserve area. Participants conceived of Aboriginal rights largely as the rights to specific services/benefits and to respect for Aboriginal cultures/identities. There was a widespread perception among participants that these rights are not respected in Canada, and that this is heightened when living in an urban area. Disrespect for Aboriginal rights was perceived to negatively impact health by way of social determinants of health (e.g., psychosocial health impacts of discrimination experienced in Toronto). The paper discusses the results in the context of policy implications and future areas of research.
PubMed ID
23474122 View in PubMed
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1467 records – page 1 of 147.