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17 records – page 1 of 2.

[Beneficial with Kierkegaard in the palliative care?].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature137468
Source
Lakartidningen. 2010 Dec 8-14;107(49):3153-5
Publication Type
Article
Author
Niels Lynøe
Author Affiliation
Centrum för hälso- och sjukvårdsetik, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm.
Source
Lakartidningen. 2010 Dec 8-14;107(49):3153-5
Language
Swedish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Attitude to Death
Denmark
Existentialism
History, 19th Century
Humans
Medicine in Literature
Palliative Care - ethics
Philosophy - history
Right to Die - ethics
Terminal Care - ethics
PubMed ID
21280352 View in PubMed
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End-of-life care education for psychiatric residents: attitudes, preparedness, and conceptualizations of dignity.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature147196
Source
Acad Psychiatry. 2009 Nov-Dec;33(6):451-6
Publication Type
Article
Author
Glendon R Tait
Brian D Hodges
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychiatry and the Wilson Centre for Research in Medical Education, University of Toronto, Toronto General Hospital, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. glendon.tait@utoronto.ca
Source
Acad Psychiatry. 2009 Nov-Dec;33(6):451-6
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological - ethics
Adult
Attitude of Health Personnel
Clinical Competence - standards
Curriculum - standards
Ethics, Medical - education
Female
Humans
Internship and Residency - ethics
Male
Mental Healing - psychology
Ontario
Palliative Care
Personal Autonomy
Professional-Family Relations - ethics
Psychiatry - education - ethics
Questionnaires
Right to Die - ethics
Terminal Care - ethics - psychology
Abstract
The authors examined psychiatric residents' attitudes, perceived preparedness, experiences, and needs in end-of-life care education. They also examined how residents conceptualized good end-of-life care and dignity.
The authors conducted an electronic survey of 116 psychiatric residents at the University of Toronto. The survey had a mix of qualitative and quantitative questions.
Eighty-two of 116 invited psychiatric residents participated for a response rate of 71%. With favorable attitudes, residents felt least prepared in existential, spiritual, cultural, and some psychological aspects of caring for dying patients. Trainees conceptualized dignity at the end of life in a way very similar to that of patients, including concerns of the mind, body, soul, relationships, and autonomy. Residents desired more longitudinal, contextualized training, particularly in the psychosocial, existential, and spiritual aspects of care.
This is the first study to examine the end-of-life educational experience of psychiatric residents. Despite conceptualizing quality care and the construct of dignity similarly to dying patients, psychiatric residents feel poorly prepared to deliver such care, particularly the nonphysical aspects of caring for the dying. These results will inform curriculum development in end-of-life care for psychiatric residents, a complex area now considered a core competency.
PubMed ID
19933886 View in PubMed
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Ethical dilemmas around the dying patient with stroke: a qualitative interview study with team members on stroke units in Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature258547
Source
J Neurosci Nurs. 2014 Jun;46(3):162-70
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2014
Author
Helene Eriksson
Gisela Andersson
Louise Olsson
Anna Milberg
Maria Friedrichsen
Source
J Neurosci Nurs. 2014 Jun;46(3):162-70
Date
Jun-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Attitude of Health Personnel
Attitude to Death
Communication Barriers
Female
Hospice and Palliative Care Nursing - ethics
Humans
Male
Neuroscience Nursing - ethics
Nurses' Aides - ethics - psychology
Nursing Staff, Hospital - ethics - psychology
Nursing, Team - ethics
Palliative Care - ethics
Physical Therapists - ethics - psychology
Qualitative Research
Right to Die - ethics
Stroke - nursing - rehabilitation
Sweden
Terminal Care - ethics
Abstract
In Sweden, individuals affected by severe stroke are treated in specialized stroke units. In these units, patients are attended by a multiprofessional team with a focus on care in the acute phase of stroke, rehabilitation phase, and palliative phase. Caring for patients with such a large variety in condition and symptoms might be an extra challenge for the team. Today, there is a lack of knowledge in team experiences of the dilemmas that appear and the consequences that emerge. Therefore, the purpose of this article was to study ethical dilemmas, different approaches, and what consequences they had among healthcare professionals working with the dying patients with stroke in acute stroke units. Forty-one healthcare professionals working in a stroke team were interviewed either in focus groups or individually. The data were transcribed verbatim and analyzed using content analysis. The ethical dilemmas that appeared were depending on "nondecisions" about palliative care or discontinuation of treatments. The lack of decision made the team members act based on their own individual skills, because of the absence of common communication tools. When a decision was made, the healthcare professionals had "problems holding to the decision." The devised and applied plans could be revalued, which was described as a setback to nondecisions again. The underlying problem and theme was "communication barriers," a consequence related to the absence of common skills and consensus among the value system. This study highlights the importance of palliative care knowledge and skills, even for patients experiencing severe stroke. To make a decision and to hold on to that is a presupposition in creating a credible care plan. However, implementing a common set of values based on palliative care with symptom control and quality of life might minimize the risk of the communication barrier that may arise and increases the ability to create a healthcare that is meaningful and dignified.
PubMed ID
24796473 View in PubMed
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Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 2009 Sep 14;171(38):2765; author reply 2765
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-14-2009
Author
Thomas Alber
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 2009 Sep 14;171(38):2765; author reply 2765
Date
Sep-14-2009
Language
Danish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Denmark
Euthanasia, Active - ethics
Humans
Right to Die - ethics
PubMed ID
19774697 View in PubMed
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Four themes in recent Swedish bioethics debates.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature133692
Source
Camb Q Healthc Ethics. 2011 Jul;20(3):409-17
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2011
Author
Gert Helgesson
Stefan Eriksson
Author Affiliation
Centre for Bioethics at the Karolinska Institute and Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
Source
Camb Q Healthc Ethics. 2011 Jul;20(3):409-17
Date
Jul-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Advisory Committees
Analgesia - ethics
Bioethical Issues
Bioethics - education
Deep Sedation - ethics
Double Effect Principle
Ethics, Research
Humans
Informed Consent - ethics
Palliative Care - ethics
Right to Die - ethics - legislation & jurisprudence
Scientific Misconduct - ethics
Suicide, Assisted - ethics
Sweden
Terminal Care - ethics
Tissue Banks - ethics - legislation & jurisprudence
Withholding Treatment - ethics
Abstract
A wide variety of bioethical themes have recently been debated and researched in Sweden, including genetic screening, HPV vaccination strategies, end-of-life care, injustices and priority setting in healthcare, dual-use research, and the never-ending story of scientific fraud. Also, there are some new events related to Swedish biobanking that might be of general interest. Here we will concentrate on four themes: end-of-life care, dual-use research, scientific fraud, and biobanking.
PubMed ID
21676328 View in PubMed
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[Future age distribution a challenge to geriatric ethics. Common values crucial for solving ethical dilemmas]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature79915
Source
Lakartidningen. 2006 Oct 11-17;103(41):3092-4
Publication Type
Article
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 2009 Sep 7;171(37):2677
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-7-2009
Author
Josée Linnemann
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 2009 Sep 7;171(37):2677
Date
Sep-7-2009
Language
Danish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Denmark
Euthanasia, Active - ethics - legislation & jurisprudence
Humans
Right to Die - ethics - legislation & jurisprudence
PubMed ID
19774699 View in PubMed
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[Legalizing the unquestionable right to decide over one own's life]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature89121
Source
Lakartidningen. 2009 Mar 11-17;106(11):793-4
Publication Type
Article

[Let us together create guidelines for resuscitation of patients].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature124518
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 2012 Apr 2;174(14):970; author reply 970
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2-2012
Author
Dorte Elise Møller Holdgaard
Birthe Thørring
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 2012 Apr 2;174(14):970; author reply 970
Date
Apr-2-2012
Language
Danish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Denmark
Humans
Practice Guidelines as Topic
Resuscitation Orders - ethics
Right to Die - ethics
PubMed ID
22574322 View in PubMed
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17 records – page 1 of 2.