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6 records – page 1 of 1.

Atopic disease in seven-year-old children. Incidence in relation to family history.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature16277
Source
Acta Paediatr Scand. 1977 Jul;66(4):465-71
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-1977
Author
N I Kjellman
Source
Acta Paediatr Scand. 1977 Jul;66(4):465-71
Date
Jul-1977
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Asthma - epidemiology - genetics
Child
Dermatitis, Atopic - epidemiology - genetics
Female
Humans
Hypersensitivity, Immediate - epidemiology - genetics
Male
Otitis Media - epidemiology - genetics
Rhinitis, Allergic, Seasonal - epidemiology - genetics
Sweden
Urticaria - epidemiology - genetics
Abstract
The incidence of atopic disease and its relation to the family history was studied by questionnaire in 1325 children, 7 years of age. A higher incidence of bronchial asthma (2.7%) was found than in a previous Swedish study. The total incidence of atopic disease in the children was 15.1% with a higher level when there was a double parental history of such disease (42.6%) as compared with a single such history (19.8%). When both parents had an identical type of atopic disease, i.e. respiratory or skin, the incidence of atopic disease was higher (72.2%) than when non-identical types occurred in the parents (20.8%). The findings support theories of a polygenic transmission of atopic disease as well as a genetic influence on symptom specificity in such disease and may be of value in genetic counselling.
PubMed ID
899762 View in PubMed
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Does heredity modify the association between farming and allergy in children?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature15308
Source
Acta Paediatr. 2002;91(11):1163-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
2002
Author
S T Remes
J. Pekkanen
L. Soininen
M. Kajosaari
T. Husman
A. Koivikko
Author Affiliation
Department of Pediatrics, Kuopio University Hospital, Kuopio, Finland. Sami.Remes@ktl.fi
Source
Acta Paediatr. 2002;91(11):1163-9
Date
2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Agriculture
Asthma - epidemiology - genetics
Cross-Sectional Studies
Eczema - epidemiology
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Hypersensitivity - epidemiology - genetics
Male
Odds Ratio
Prevalence
Rhinitis, Allergic, Seasonal - epidemiology - genetics
Smoking
Abstract
AIM: It has been suggested that living on a farm decreases the risk of childhood allergy, especially if farming involves livestock. The aim of this study was to examine the association between farming and allergy in children, and the influence of atopic heredity in this association. METHODS: The cross-sectional data of the 7981 children aged 13-14 y who participated in the Finnish ISAAC study between the years 1994 and 1995 were used to evaluate the association between farming and allergy. RESULTS: Living on a farm was associated with a decreased risk of current symptoms of allergic rhinoconjunctivitis among all children (aOR 0.79; 95% CI 0.63, 0.99), and with a decreased risk of hay fever, especially among those children with a parental history of hayfever (aOR 0.60; 95% CI 0.40-0.89, p = 0.072 for interaction). The children of farmers with a history of hay fever also had a decreased risk of current wheeze (aOR 0.38; 95% CI 0.12-1.24, p = 0.040 for interaction). No significant association was found between farming and either asthma or eczema. Children living on a farm with livestock had the lowest risk of allergic rhinoconjunctivitis (aOR 0.69), followed by those living on a farm without livestock (aOR 0.89) compared with the non-farming children (p-value for trend 0.024). CONCLUSION: Our results support the recent findings on a decreased risk of allergy among the children living on farms. A possible differential effect of parental history of hay fever on the relation of farming environment and the risk of allergic symptoms warrant further investigation.
Notes
Comment In: Acta Paediatr. 2002;91(11):1147-912463307
PubMed ID
12463312 View in PubMed
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Familial occurrence of atopic disease: genetic versus environmental factors.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature15998
Source
Clin Exp Allergy. 1993 Oct;23(10):829-34
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-1993
Author
N. Aberg
Author Affiliation
Department of Paediatrics I, Gothenburg University, Göteborg, Sweden.
Source
Clin Exp Allergy. 1993 Oct;23(10):829-34
Date
Oct-1993
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Angioneurotic Edema - epidemiology - genetics
Asthma - epidemiology - genetics
Breast Feeding
Child
Cluster analysis
Conjunctivitis, Allergic - epidemiology - genetics
Eczema - epidemiology - genetics
Environment
Fathers
Female
Humans
Hypersensitivity, Immediate - epidemiology - genetics
Male
Mothers
Prevalence
Questionnaires
Rhinitis, Allergic, Perennial - epidemiology - genetics
Rhinitis, Allergic, Seasonal - epidemiology - genetics
Sweden - epidemiology
Tobacco Smoke Pollution
Urticaria - epidemiology - genetics
Abstract
Cumulative life prevalence of atopic disease (any of reported symptoms of asthma/wheezy bronchitis, allergic rhinitis, eczema and urticaria) was studied by means of a questionnaire in 19814 (7-, 10- and 14-year-old) Swedish school children and their parents. Maternal history was found to be twice as common as paternal history. The children of affected mothers contracted atopic disease in the same proportion as the children of affected fathers yielding twice as many affected children with affected mothers than with affected fathers. The strongest parental influence on childhood disease was seen for multiple symptoms and for congruent symptoms with both parents. The number of children with both parents affected was 1.6 times larger than expected. A possible dose-response effect in polygenic inheritance is discussed as well as assumed impact of environmental factors with a tendency to familial clustering.
PubMed ID
10780889 View in PubMed
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Genes, environments, and sex: factors of importance in atopic diseases in 7-9-year-old Swedish twins.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature15770
Source
Allergy. 1997 Nov;52(11):1079-86
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-1997
Author
P. Lichtenstein
M. Svartengren
Author Affiliation
Division of Genetic Epidemiology, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
Source
Allergy. 1997 Nov;52(11):1079-86
Date
Nov-1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Asthma - epidemiology - genetics
Child
Child, Preschool
Diseases in Twins - epidemiology - genetics
Eczema - epidemiology - genetics
Environmental Illness - epidemiology - genetics
Female
Humans
Hypersensitivity, Immediate - epidemiology - genetics
Incidence
Male
Matched-Pair Analysis
Multivariate Analysis
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Rhinitis, Allergic, Seasonal - epidemiology - genetics
Sex Factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Twins, Dizygotic
Twins, Monozygotic
Urticaria - epidemiology - genetics
Abstract
Various atopic manifestations among adults have been shown to be influenced mainly by genetic factors. With the increase in prevalence of atopic diseases in recent years, especially among children, a great deal of attention has been given to environmental causes. In a study of 1480 Swedish twin pairs, 7-9 years old, we examined the importance of genetic and environmental factors in asthma, hay fever, eczema, and urticaria. Structural equation model fitting showed 33-76% of the variation in liability to the diseases to be due to genetic effects. Shared environmental effects were also important for hay fever and urticaria in both sexes and for eczema among girls. The clustering of atopic disease in families was almost entirely due to a common set of genes, but each disease manifestation also seemed to have specific genes of importance. Investigation of unlike-sex twins showed that boys had a higher cumulative incidence of asthma and hay fever than girls, whereas girls had a higher incidence of eczema. Thus, it may be concluded that although genetic factors are of major importance in atopic manifestation in children, both environmental and sex-related factors play a role.
Notes
Comment In: Allergy. 1998 Jun;53(6):6209689346
PubMed ID
9404559 View in PubMed
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Hay fever--a Finnish nationwide study of adolescent twins and their parents.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature204165
Source
Allergy. 1998 Sep;53(9):885-90
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1998
Author
M. Räsänen
T. Laitinen
J. Kaprio
M. Koskenvuo
L A Laitinen
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine, Helsinki University Central Hospital, Finland.
Source
Allergy. 1998 Sep;53(9):885-90
Date
Sep-1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Diseases in Twins - epidemiology - genetics
Family Health
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Health Surveys
Humans
Incidence
Male
Parents
Questionnaires
Rhinitis, Allergic, Seasonal - epidemiology - genetics
Risk factors
Twins, Dizygotic - genetics
Twins, Monozygotic - genetics
Abstract
Like other atopic diseases, hay fever is known to cluster in families. This clustering is due either to effects of a shared family environment or to genetic inheritance. By comparing the occurrence of hay fever among monozygous (MZ) and dizygous (DZ) twin pairs, we were able to estimate the contribution of genetic and environmental factors in the development of hay fever.
A questionnaire mailed to a nationwide sample of 2483 families with 16-year-old twins furnished data for the cumulative incidence of physician-diagnosed hay fever among these adolescents and their parents.
Among the 1765 twin pairs with data available for analysis, hay fever was reported for 14.1% of boys (95% CI=12.4-15.8%) and 10.0% of girls (95% CI=8.6-11.4%). The MZ twin pairs (probandwise concordance rate=60.3%, 95% CI =52-68%) were significantly more concordant for hay fever than were DZ twin pairs (31.5%, 95% CI=26-36%). Genetic factors accounted for 74-82% of the interindividual variability in liability to hay fever, variation in shared family environment for 7% at most, and unique (individual) environment for 18%.
Familial occurrence of hay fever is mainly due to genes predisposing to the trait. Environmental exposures shared in common by family members but varying between families appear to account for at most a modest proportion of the variability in risk of developing hay fever.
PubMed ID
9788691 View in PubMed
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Maternal vitamin D intake during pregnancy is inversely associated with asthma and allergic rhinitis in 5-year-old children.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature150334
Source
Clin Exp Allergy. 2009 Jun;39(6):875-82
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2009
Author
M. Erkkola
M. Kaila
B I Nwaru
C. Kronberg-Kippilä
S. Ahonen
J. Nevalainen
R. Veijola
J. Pekkanen
J. Ilonen
O. Simell
M. Knip
S M Virtanen
Author Affiliation
Division of Nutrition, Department of Applied Chemistry and Microbiology, University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland. maijaliisa.erkkola@helsinki.fi
Source
Clin Exp Allergy. 2009 Jun;39(6):875-82
Date
Jun-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Asthma - epidemiology - genetics - immunology
Child, Preschool
Cohort Studies
Dermatitis, Atopic - epidemiology - genetics - immunology
Dietary Supplements - adverse effects
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Follow-Up Studies
HLA-DQ Antigens - immunology
HLA-DQ beta-Chains
Humans
Kaplan-Meier Estimate
Male
Pregnancy
Questionnaires
Rhinitis, Allergic, Perennial - epidemiology - genetics - immunology
Rhinitis, Allergic, Seasonal - epidemiology - genetics - immunology
Vitamin D - administration & dosage - adverse effects - immunology
Abstract
Vitamin D is known to have a number of immunological effects and it may play a role in preventing allergic diseases. Objectives To study the effect of maternal intake of vitamin D during pregnancy on the emergence of asthma, allergic rhinitis (AR), and atopic eczema by the age of 5 years in children with HLA-DQB1-conferred susceptibility for type 1 diabetes.
Children (1669) participating in the population-based birth cohort study were followed for asthma, AR, and atopic eczema assessed by validated questionnaire at 5 years. Maternal diet was assessed by a food-frequency questionnaire.
The mean maternal intake of vitamin D was 5.1 (SD 2.6) microg from food and 1.4 (2.6) microg from supplements. Only 32% of the women were taking vitamin D supplements. When adjusted for potential confounders, maternal intake of vitamin D from food was negatively related to risk of asthma [hazard ratio (HR) 0.80; 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.64-0.99] and AR [HR 0.85; 95% CI 0.75-0.97]. Vitamin D supplements alone were not associated with any outcome. Adjustment for maternal intake of other dietary factors did not change the results.
Maternal vitamin D intake from foods during pregnancy may be negatively associated with risk of asthma and AR in childhood.
PubMed ID
19522996 View in PubMed
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6 records – page 1 of 1.