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Alternative medicine use by rheumatology patients in a universal health care setting.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature219216
Source
J Rheumatol. 1994 Jan;21(1):148-52
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-1994
Author
M. Boisset
M A Fitzcharles
Author Affiliation
Rheumatic Disease Unit, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec, Canada.
Source
J Rheumatol. 1994 Jan;21(1):148-52
Date
Jan-1994
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Ambulatory Care Facilities
Canada
Complementary Therapies - economics - methods - utilization
Female
Health Care Costs
Humans
Male
National Health Programs
Questionnaires
Rheumatic Diseases - economics - therapy
Rheumatology - methods
Abstract
To assess the prevalence, extent of use, and cost of alternative medicine by patients attending a rheumatology clinic.
Two hundred and thirty-five unselected consecutive patients attending a rheumatology clinic were evaluated by questionnaire to record their current use of alternative medicine practices.
Sixty-six percent of patients had used alternative medicine interventions in the preceding 12 months; 54% used over the counter products, 39% spiritual aids (including prayer, relaxation, meditation), and 13% each had visited alternative practitioners or used dietary interventions. Patients in the upper middle income group and French speaking patients used more bought products, but no other differences were observed when the groups were analyzed according to level of education, income or cultural background. The current annual cost for the patients of alternative medical therapies was $100.
Our results demonstrate a moderate use of alternative medicine by rheumatology patients, mostly inexpensive products and no cost spiritual aids. Universal health care may have a negative impact on the extent of use of more costly practices.
PubMed ID
8151571 View in PubMed
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Back to front? Examining research priorities in rheumatology.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature224267
Source
Br J Rheumatol. 1992 Mar;31(3):193-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-1992
Author
G H Williams
A S Rigby
A C Papageorgiou
Author Affiliation
Centre for Health Studies, University College Salford.
Source
Br J Rheumatol. 1992 Mar;31(3):193-6
Date
Mar-1992
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Back Pain - epidemiology
Great Britain - epidemiology
Health Priorities
Humans
MEDLINE
North America - epidemiology
Research Design
Rheumatology - methods
Scandinavia - epidemiology
Abstract
Arthrosis and back troubles together account for at least a third of all rheumatic suffering, and they are much the commonest rheumatological causes of impairment and disability. In contrast to the inflammatory arthropathies, one cannot help but be struck by the fact that research endeavour has not been commensurate with the burden that has to be endured.
Notes
Comment In: Br J Rheumatol. 1992 Aug;31(8):505-61643448
PubMed ID
1531777 View in PubMed
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A Canadian survey of current methotrexate prescribing practices in rheumatoid arthritis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature217857
Source
J Rheumatol. 1994 Jul;21(7):1220-3
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-1994
Author
D. Collins
N. Bellamy
J. Campbell
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine, University of Western Ontario, London, Canada.
Source
J Rheumatol. 1994 Jul;21(7):1220-3
Date
Jul-1994
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Arthritis, Rheumatoid - drug therapy
Canada
Cross-Sectional Studies
Data Collection
Drug Administration Schedule
Drug Prescriptions
Humans
Liver Function Tests
Methotrexate - administration & dosage - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Physician's Practice Patterns
Questionnaires
Rheumatology - methods
Abstract
To conduct a cross sectional survey of methotrexate (MTX) prescribing practices of Canadian rheumatologists in their treatment of rheumatoid arthritis (RA).
A 15-item questionnaire was mailed to 197 rheumatologists with a 79% response rate after 3 mailings.
The usual starting dose was 7.5 mg/week (range = 2.5-15.0) and the usual maximum dose prescribed was 15 mg/week (range = 10-50); 81% routinely coadministered MTX and non-steroidal antiinflammatory drugs; 28% routinely used folic acid prophylaxis; 97% of respondents performed regular assessments of liver function. Only 17% requested a liver biopsy after a certain time and 23% after a certain cumulative dose. Sixty-two percent performed pre-MTX liver biopsy on patients with liver function abnormalities. Only 14% of respondents routinely performed pulmonary function tests. Ninety-one percent of respondents noted that 1-50% (mode = 10%) of patients refused to accept MTX therapy after it had been recommended, usually because of fear of side effects.
Despite potential toxicity, the majority of respondents used MTX in the treatment of adult RA.
PubMed ID
7966061 View in PubMed
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Changing structure and resources in a rheumatology combined unit during 1977-1999.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature77822
Source
Scand J Rheumatol. 2007 Mar-Apr;36(2):125-35
Publication Type
Article
Author
Kvalvik A G
Larsen S.
Aadland H A
Høyeraal H M
Author Affiliation
Haugesund Rheumatism Hospital. Haugesund.
Source
Scand J Rheumatol. 2007 Mar-Apr;36(2):125-35
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Ambulatory Care
Hospitals, Special - organization & administration
Humans
Inpatients
Length of Stay - trends
Norway
Patient Care - methods - trends
Patient Care Team - organization & administration - trends
Retrospective Studies
Rheumatic Diseases - therapy
Rheumatology - methods - organization & administration
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: The aim was to study the changing structure and resources in a rheumatism hospital during the period 1977-1999 when rheumatology care was decentralized and new treatment strategies were introduced. METHODS: Data on hospital management and production were retrieved retrospectively. RESULTS: The number of beds was stepwise reduced from 133 to 44 and the average length of stay declined from 48 to 16 days. The combined unit and multidisciplinary team organization was kept, ensuring the combined effort of rheumatologists, rheumasurgeons, registered nurses, physiotherapists, occupational therapists, and social workers. One-third of the total staff was rheumateam members in 1977 compared to one-half in 1999. The proportions of physicians and registered nurses increased while the proportion of physiotherapists was stable. The number of discharges remained relatively unchanged and the number of outpatient consultations increased. Inflammatory rheumatic diseases remained the largest diagnostic group of in- and outpatients. Hospitalized care was received primarily by patients with arthritis and spondylitis. Patients with vasculitis and diffuse disorders of connective tissue accounted for an increasing proportion of the outpatient clinic production. Surgical procedures became more prevalent. Since 1995 approximately 50 large joint replacements have been performed annually. CONCLUSION: The length of stay declined and patient care was shifted towards the outpatient clinic. The multidisciplinary team was strengthened. More resources were dedicated to physician-led and nurse-dependent procedures, but physiotherapy and rehabilitation remained part of inpatient care throughout the period. The expertise concentrated on inflammatory rheumatic disorders. The modesty of the large joint replacement caseload may challenge decentralized care.
PubMed ID
17476619 View in PubMed
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Comparison of the 1987 ACR and 2010 ACR/EULAR classification criteria for rheumatoid arthritis in clinical practice: a prospective cohort study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature114555
Source
Scand J Rheumatol. 2013;42(5):362-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
Author
E. Berglin
S R Dahlqvist
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Rheumatology, Umeå University , Sweden.
Source
Scand J Rheumatol. 2013;42(5):362-8
Date
2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Antirheumatic Agents - therapeutic use
Arthritis, Rheumatoid - classification - diagnosis - drug therapy - physiopathology
Early Diagnosis
Female
Foot Joints - pathology - radiography
Hand Joints - pathology - radiography
Humans
Male
Methotrexate - therapeutic use
Middle Aged
Practice Guidelines as Topic
Prospective Studies
Rheumatology - methods
Sensitivity and specificity
Symptom Assessment - methods
Synovitis - diagnosis
Abstract
To compare application of the 1987 American College of Rheumatology (ACR) and 2010 ACR/European League Against Rheumatism (EULAR) classification criteria for diagnosing rheumatoid arthritis (RA) in clinical practice.
The medical records of patients with early arthritis attending the Rheumatology Department, Umeå University Hospital (n = 1026) were analysed. Patients with synovitis in at least one joint, no diagnosis other than RA being better for explaining the synovitis, and duration of symptoms less than 1 year at first visit, and at least 1 year of follow-up were included consecutively. Fulfilment of the 1987 and 2010 criteria at baseline was evaluated. Sensitivity and specificity for each criterion set, where estimated by using the outcome measures: initiation of methotrexate (MTX) therapy during the first year, and a clinical diagnosis of RA at the 1-year follow-up. Radiographs of hands and feet were evaluated using the Larsen score.
The study included 313 patients, of whom 56% fulfilled the 1987 ACR criteria, 74% the 2010 ACR/EULAR criteria, and 53% both sets of criteria at baseline. The sensitivity/specificity for the 1987 and 2010 criteria with MTX within the first year as the outcome measure was 0.68/0.79 and 0.84/0.54, respectively, and with a diagnosis of RA at follow-up 0.72/0.83 and 0.91/0.65, respectively. Older patients (i.e. = 60 years) more often fulfilled the 2010 criteria. Patients who fulfilled the 2010 ACR/EULAR but not the 1987 ACR criteria had a lower Larsen score at inclusion and after 2 years.
Compared with the 1987 ACR criteria, the 2010 ACR/EULAR criteria have higher sensitivity but lower specificity, especially in patients aged = 60 years. The 1987 ACR criteria are suggested to predict a more erosive disease.
PubMed ID
23607599 View in PubMed
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Construct validity of ILAR and EULAR criteria in juvenile idiopathic arthritis: a population based incidence study from the Nordic countries. International League of Associations for Rheumatology. European League Against Rheumatism.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature13993
Source
J Rheumatol. 2001 Dec;28(12):2737-43
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2001
Author
L. Berntson
A. Fasth
B. Andersson-Gäre
J. Kristinsson
P. Lahdenne
G. Marhaug
S. Nielsen
P. Pelkonen
E. Svensson
Author Affiliation
Department of Pediatrics, Hospital of Falun, Sweden. lillemor.berntson@falun.mail.telia.com
Source
J Rheumatol. 2001 Dec;28(12):2737-43
Date
Dec-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Arthritis, Juvenile Rheumatoid - classification - epidemiology
Child
Child, Preschool
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Iceland - epidemiology
Incidence
Infant
International Cooperation
Male
Prospective Studies
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Rheumatology - methods - standards
Scandinavia - epidemiology
Societies, Medical
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: New classification criteria (ILAR) have been proposed for juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA). They are more descriptive than those formerly used [American College of Rheumatology (ACR), European League Against Rheumatism (EULAR)], but require validation against classifications already in use. We validated the ILAR criteria in relation to the EULAR criteria in a prospective, incidence, and population based setting, and analyzed their feasibility. METHODS: Construct validity of ILAR and EULAR classification criteria refers to how closely the 2 instruments are related and how each of them operates in classifying subgroups/categories. Twenty doctors in 5 Nordic countries collected data from the incidence cases within their catchment areas during an 18 month period beginning July 1, 1997. Clinical and serological data from the first year of disease were collected. RESULTS: A total of 322 patients were included. Classification according to the ILAR criteria was possible in 321 patients; 290 patients had a disease duration > or = 3 months and were classified according to the EULAR criteria. One child could only be classified according to the EULAR criteria. Thus, 31/322 (9.6%) children were classified according to the ILAR criteria only. Forty-eight of 321 (15%) patients did not fit into any category and 6% (20/321) fulfilled criteria for2 categories. In the ILAR classification 5 out of 7 categories/subgroups have 2 to 5 specified exclusion criteria that highly discriminate the definition of each patient. In our study the exclusion criteria were fulfilled to only a small extent. CONCLUSION: The EULAR and ILAR criteria differ concerning the operational definitions of the subvariables involved, which complicates their comparison. By using ILAR rather than EULAR criteria the number of cases with juvenile arthritis increased by 10%, considering the first half-year after onset. The validity of the ILAR criteria is low since they often exclude patients from subgroup classification and the possibility of having more than one diagnosis is not negligible. The specified exclusion criteria for some of the subgroups are difficult to fulfill in clinical work and variables involved could be questioned with regard to their consistency.
PubMed ID
11764226 View in PubMed
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DANBIO: a nationwide registry of biological therapies in Denmark.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature13706
Source
Clin Exp Rheumatol. 2005 Sep-Oct;23(5 Suppl 39):S205-7
Publication Type
Article
Author
M L Hetland
Author Affiliation
DANBIO, Copenhagen University Hospital at Hvidovre, Department of Rheumatology, Hvidovre, Denmark. merete.hetland@dadlnet.dk
Source
Clin Exp Rheumatol. 2005 Sep-Oct;23(5 Suppl 39):S205-7
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Antirheumatic Agents - therapeutic use
Biological Products - therapeutic use
Databases, Factual
Denmark
Female
Humans
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Prognosis
Registries
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Rheumatic Diseases - diagnosis - physiopathology - therapy
Rheumatology - methods
Severity of Illness Index
Abstract
Since the year 2000, Danish rheumatologists have been collecting data on a routine basis in the nationwide DANBIO registry, which includes all rheumatologic patients receiving biological drugs. Demographic data, markers of disease activity, current treatment, serious and non-serious adverse events and reasons for discontinuation are registered at each visit either on paper forms or on-line. By June 2005, approximately 3000 treatment courses (18,000 visits) were in the registry, corresponding to close to 90% of eligible patients. Rheumatoid arthritis was the most prevalent diagnosis (75%) followed by ankylosing spondylitis (11%) and psoriatic arthritis (7%). Infections occurred in 43% of the treatment series.
PubMed ID
16273809 View in PubMed
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The Danish version of the Juvenile Arthritis Multidimensional Assessment Report (JAMAR).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature295149
Source
Rheumatol Int. 2018 Apr; 38(Suppl 1):131-138
Publication Type
Journal Article
Multicenter Study
Validation Studies
Date
Apr-2018
Author
Susan Nielsen
Troels Herlin
Anne Estmann Christensen
Marek Zak
Charlotte Myrup
Mia Glerup
Alessandro Consolaro
Francesca Bovis
Nicolino Ruperto
Author Affiliation
Paediatric Rheumatology Unit, Børnereumatologiskambulatorium, afsnit 4272, BørneUngeKlinikken, Juliane Marie Centret, Rigshospitalet, Blegdamsvej 9, 2100, Copenhagen, Denmark. rh04430@rh.dk.
Source
Rheumatol Int. 2018 Apr; 38(Suppl 1):131-138
Date
Apr-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Multicenter Study
Validation Studies
Keywords
Adolescent
Age of Onset
Arthritis, Juvenile - diagnosis - physiopathology - psychology - therapy
Case-Control Studies
Child
Child, Preschool
Cultural Characteristics
Denmark
Disability Evaluation
Female
Health status
Humans
Male
Parents - psychology
Patient Reported Outcome Measures
Patients - psychology
Predictive value of tests
Prognosis
Psychometrics
Quality of Life
Reproducibility of Results
Rheumatology - methods
Translating
Abstract
The Juvenile Arthritis Multidimensional Assessment Report (JAMAR) is a new parent/patient-reported outcome measure that enables a thorough assessment of the disease status in children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA). We report the results of the cross-cultural adaptation and validation of the parent and patient versions of the JAMAR in the Danish language. The reading comprehension of the questionnaire was tested in ten JIA parents and patients. Each participating centre was asked to collect demographic, clinical data and the JAMAR in 100 consecutive JIA patients or all consecutive patients seen in a 6-month period and to administer the JAMAR to 100 healthy children and their parents. The statistical validation phase explored descriptive statistics and the psychometric issues of the JAMAR: the three Likert assumptions, floor/ceiling effects, internal consistency, Cronbach's alpha, interscale correlations, test-retest reliability and construct validity (convergent and discriminant validity). A total of 303 JIA patients (7.9% systemic, 35% oligoarticular, 22.1% RF negative polyarthritis, 35% other categories) and 99 healthy children, were enrolled in three centres. The JAMAR components discriminated well healthy subjects from JIA patients. All JAMAR components revealed good psychometric performances. In conclusion, the Danish version of the JAMAR is a valid tool for the assessment of children with JIA and is suitable for use both in routine clinical practice and clinical research.
Notes
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Cites: Arthritis Rheum. 1997 Jul;40(7):1202-9 PMID 9214419
Cites: Arch Dis Child. 2011 Jun;96(6):596-601 PMID 21317432
Cites: J Rheumatol. 2010 Jul;37(7):1534-41 PMID 20551105
Cites: J Rheumatol. 1998 Oct;25(10):1991-4 PMID 9779856
Cites: Arthritis Rheum. 1991 Jul;34(7):873-80 PMID 2059234
Cites: Pediatr Rheumatol Online J. 2012 Nov 20;10(1):39 PMID 23164467
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Cites: Arthritis Rheum. 1994 Dec;37(12):1761-9 PMID 7986222
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Cites: J Rheumatol. 2012 Apr;39(4):856-63 PMID 22298905
PubMed ID
29637339 View in PubMed
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[Development of studies on problem of infectious arthritis at the Institute of RHeumatology, Russian Academy of Medical Sciences in 1970 to 1990].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature203156
Source
Vestn Ross Akad Med Nauk. 1998;(12):23-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
1998
Author
E R Agababova
Source
Vestn Ross Akad Med Nauk. 1998;(12):23-6
Date
1998
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Academies and Institutes - history
Arthritis, Infectious - etiology - immunology - therapy
Chlamydia Infections - etiology - immunology - therapy
History, 20th Century
Humans
Research - history - trends
Rheumatology - methods
Russia
Yersinia Infections - etiology - immunology - therapy
Abstract
The paper presents information on the studies on the elucidation of the etiopathogenetic role of Chlamydia and Yersinia infections in reactive arthritis, which have been made at the Institute in the past decades. Among them it mentions the first experiments and subsequent findings of detection of both Chlamydia and DNA in joint tissues in urogenic arthritis, those of identification of altered minor forms of this microbe in chronic types, which mimic in vitro persistent Chlamydia infection. The clinical experience gained by the Institute in treating Chlamydia-induced urogenic arthritis with high-dose antibiotics is reported. In addition to detailed studies of the clinical manifestations and outcomes of Yersinia-induced arthritis, long-term follow-ups have examined an association of clinical and serological manifestations with HLA B27 carriage; it is suggested that there is a partial similarity between this antigen and Yersinia antigens. Pronounced changes have been found in the mucosa of the intestine and its microflora in enterogenous reactive arthritis and a treatment with bifidum-containing drugs proposed. A variety of clinical and serological manifestations of Lyme borreliasis detected in the endemic areas of Russia is described. The specific features of rheumatological manifestations of this disease are comparable with those observed in the USA and Europe.
PubMed ID
9987955 View in PubMed
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Differences between rheumatologists and other internists regarding diagnosis and treatment of systemic lupus erythematosus.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature128933
Source
Rheumatology (Oxford). 2012 Apr;51(4):663-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2012
Author
Karoline Lerang
Inge-Margrethe Gilboe
Jan Tore Gran
Author Affiliation
Department of Rheumatology, Oslo University Hospital, Rikshospitalet, Pb 4950 Nydalen, 0424 Oslo, Norway. klerang@ous-hf.no
Source
Rheumatology (Oxford). 2012 Apr;51(4):663-9
Date
Apr-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Antibodies, Antiphospholipid - blood
Antirheumatic Agents - therapeutic use
Biological Markers - blood
Child
Drug Utilization - statistics & numerical data
Female
Health Services Research - methods
Humans
Hydroxychloroquine - therapeutic use
Interprofessional Relations
Lupus Erythematosus, Systemic - diagnosis - drug therapy
Male
Medicine - methods - standards
Middle Aged
Norway
Physician's Practice Patterns - statistics & numerical data
Rheumatology - methods - standards
Young Adult
Abstract
To compare the diagnostics and treatment of SLE patients in the care of rheumatologists with patients in the care of other specialities within a geographically complete cohort.
Nine different sources were used to identify SLE patients resident in Oslo between 1999 and 2008. Only SLE patients fulfilling four or more of the updated 1997 ACR criteria were included. Data were extracted from medical records. The patients were classified into three groups according to each patient's responsible doctor's speciality.
A total of 325 SLE patients were included in the study. Of these, 227 had solely been in the care of rheumatologists (rheumatology group), 34 had solely been in the care of nephrologists, haematologists or infectious disease specialists (non-rheumatology group) and 64 had been in the care of both rheumatologists and other specialists (multidisciplinary group). Even though patients in the non-rheumatology group and multidisciplinary group showed similar disease characteristics, patients in the non-rheumatology group were less often tested for aPLs (68 vs 94%; P?=?0.001) and less often treated with HCQ (12 vs 78%; P?
PubMed ID
22157467 View in PubMed
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35 records – page 1 of 4.