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399 records – page 1 of 40.

[7 years' experience in organizing sanatorium wards for children with rheumatism in a rural locale of Lvov Province]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature43746
Source
Pediatr Akus Ginekol. 1972;4:27
Publication Type
Article
Date
1972
Author
V P Ferents
Iu V Manchenko
Source
Pediatr Akus Ginekol. 1972;4:27
Date
1972
Language
Ukrainian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Child
Hospitals, Special
Humans
Rheumatic Diseases - therapy
Rural Health
Ukraine
PubMed ID
4545065 View in PubMed
Less detail

About the method of studying medical assistance management for rheumatic children.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature246390
Source
Sante Publique (Bucur). 1980;23(4):347-54
Publication Type
Article
Date
1980

Access to care for rheumatology patients may be compromised: results of a survey to members of the Canadian Rheumatology Association.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature173517
Source
J Rheumatol. 2005 Aug;32(8):1418-21
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2005

Access to pediatric rheumatology subspecialty care in British Columbia, Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature153253
Source
J Rheumatol. 2009 Feb;36(2):410-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2009
Author
Natalie J Shiff
Reem Abdwani
David A Cabral
Kristin M Houghton
Peter N Malleson
Ross E Petty
Victor M Espinosa
Lori B Tucker
Author Affiliation
Division of Rheumatology, BC Children's Hospital, Room K4-120, 4480 Oak Street, Vancouver, BC V6H 3V4. nshiff@cw.bc.ca
Source
J Rheumatol. 2009 Feb;36(2):410-5
Date
Feb-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Ambulatory Care Facilities
British Columbia
Child
Child, Preschool
Female
Health Personnel - statistics & numerical data - trends
Health Services Accessibility - statistics & numerical data - trends
Humans
Male
Medicine - statistics & numerical data - trends
National Health Programs - statistics & numerical data - trends
Parents
Pediatrics - statistics & numerical data - trends
Quality of Health Care - statistics & numerical data - trends
Questionnaires
Referral and Consultation
Rheumatic Diseases - diagnosis - therapy
Specialization
Time Factors
Abstract
Early recognition and treatment of pediatric rheumatic diseases is associated with improved outcome. We documented access to pediatric rheumatology subspecialty care for children in British Columbia (BC), Canada, referred to the pediatric rheumatology clinic at BC Children's Hospital, Vancouver.
An audit of new patients attending the outpatient clinic from May 2006 to February 2007 was conducted. Parents completed a questionnaire through a guided interview at the initial clinic assessment. Referral dates were obtained from the referral letters. Patients were classified as having rheumatic disease, nonrheumatic disease, or a pain syndrome based on final diagnosis by a pediatric rheumatologist.
Data were collected from 124 of 203 eligible new patients. Before pediatric rheumatology assessment, a median of 3 healthcare providers were seen (range 1-11) for a median of 5 visits (range 1-39). Overall, the median time interval from symptom onset to pediatric rheumatology assessment was 268 days (range 13-4989), and the median time interval from symptom onset to referral to pediatric rheumatology was 179 days (range 3-4970). Among patients ultimately diagnosed with rheumatic diseases (n = 53), there was a median of 119 days (range 3-4970) from symptom onset to referral, and 169 days (range 31-4989) from onset to pediatric rheumatology assessment.
Children and adolescents with rheumatic complaints see multiple care providers for multiple visits before referral to pediatric rheumatology, and there is often a long interval between symptom onset and this referral.
PubMed ID
19132779 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Acclimatization and clinical peculiarities of some internal diseases in the Arctic].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature110106
Source
Klin Med (Mosk). 1969 May;47(5):10-3
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-1969

The accuracy of administrative data diagnoses of systemic autoimmune rheumatic diseases.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature134892
Source
J Rheumatol. 2011 Aug;38(8):1612-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2011
Author
Sasha Bernatsky
Tina Linehan
John G Hanly
Author Affiliation
Division of Clinical Epidemiology, Department of Medicine, McGill University Health Centre (MUHC), Montreal, Quebec, Canada. sasha.bernatsky@mail.mcgill.ca
Source
J Rheumatol. 2011 Aug;38(8):1612-6
Date
Aug-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Autoimmune Diseases - diagnosis - immunology
Databases, Factual - standards
Hospital Administration - standards
Humans
Nova Scotia
Organization and Administration - standards
Reproducibility of Results
Rheumatic Diseases - diagnosis - immunology
Sensitivity and specificity
Abstract
To examine the validity of case definitions for systemic autoimmune rheumatic diseases [SARD; systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), systemic sclerosis (SSc), myositis, Sjögren's syndrome, vasculitis, and polymyalgia rheumatica] based on administrative data, compared to rheumatology records.
A list of rheumatic disease diagnoses was generated from population-based administrative billing and hospitalization databases. Subjects who had been seen by an arthritis center rheumatologist were identified, and the medical records reviewed.
We found that 844 Nova Scotia residents had a diagnosis of one of the rheumatic diseases of interest, based on administrative data, and had had = 1 rheumatology assessment at a provincial arthritis center. Charts were available on 824 subjects, some of whom had been identified in the administrative database with > 1 diagnosis. Thus a total of 1136 diagnoses were available for verification against clinical records. Of the 824 subjects, 680 (83%) had their administrative database diagnoses confirmed on chart review. The majority of subjects who were "false-positive" for a given rheumatic disease on administrative data had a true diagnosis of a similar rheumatic disease. Most sensitivity estimates for specific administrative data-based case definitions were > 90%, although for SSc, the sensitivity was 80.5%. The specificity estimates were also > 90%, except for SLE, where the specificity was 72.5%.
Although health administrative data may be a valid resource, there are potential problems regarding the specificity and sensitivity of case definitions, which should be kept in mind for future studies.
PubMed ID
21532057 View in PubMed
Less detail

Acetaminophen, some other drugs, some diseases and the risk of transitional cell carcinoma. A population-based case-control study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature15935
Source
Acta Oncol. 1995;34(6):741-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
1995
Author
G. Steineck
B E Wiholm
M. Gerhardsson de Verdier
Author Affiliation
Department of Oncology, Radiumhemmet, Karolinska Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
Source
Acta Oncol. 1995;34(6):741-8
Date
1995
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acetaminophen - adverse effects
Age Factors
Analgesics - adverse effects
Anti-Bacterial Agents - adverse effects
Anti-Infective Agents, Urinary - adverse effects
Aspirin - adverse effects
Asthma - epidemiology
Carcinoma, Transitional Cell - epidemiology
Case-Control Studies
Confidence Intervals
Disease
Female
Humans
Male
Nitrofurantoin - adverse effects
Pharmaceutical Preparations - adverse effects
Population Surveillance
Reproducibility of Results
Rheumatic Diseases - epidemiology
Risk factors
Sex Factors
Smoking - epidemiology
Sweden - epidemiology
Tetracyclines
Urinary Tract Infections - epidemiology
Urologic Neoplasms - epidemiology
Abstract
The purpose of this study was to investigate the risk of transitional cell carcinoma among subjects with an intake of acetaminophen, aspirin, some other drugs and with some intercurrent diseases. The source person-time ('study base') included subjects living in Stockholm in 1985-1987. The study included 325 subjects with a transitional cell carcinoma of the urinary tract and 393 controls randomly selected from the source person-time. Data were obtained by a postal questionnaire supplemented by a telephone interview. A relative risk (with a 95% confidence interval) of 1.6 (1.1-2.3) was obtained after an intake of acetaminophen, adjusted for age, aspirin, gender and smoking. Conversely, a 30% decrease in risk was obtained after an intake of aspirin. No details in the exposure substantiated the finding for acetaminophen. The inherent validity problems of observational studies, and the weak evidence in this and previous studies of the association between acetaminophen and transitional cell carcinoma, makes available epidemiological evidence insufficient to regulate the use of this commonly ingested analgesic. Increased risks were, in addition, found for tetracyclines, nitrofurantoin and a history of allergic asthma and a decreased risk found for rheumatic symptoms. The findings stress the nonepidemiological data concerning the potential carcinogenicity of acetaminophen and may be a foundation for future research of some other drugs and diseases.
PubMed ID
7576740 View in PubMed
Less detail

[A comparative evaluation of the efficacy of peroral and intravenous pulse therapy with methylprednisolone in rheumatic diseases]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature14180
Source
Lik Sprava. 1998 Oct-Nov;(7):48-52
Publication Type
Article
Author
K M Amosova
O B Iaremenko
O V Potapkov
N A Ivashchenko
Source
Lik Sprava. 1998 Oct-Nov;(7):48-52
Language
Ukrainian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Administration, Oral
Adult
Antirheumatic Agents - administration & dosage - adverse effects
Chi-Square Distribution
Chronic Disease
Comparative Study
Drug Evaluation
English Abstract
Female
Humans
Injections, Intravenous
Male
Methylprednisolone - administration & dosage - adverse effects
Rheumatic Diseases - blood - drug therapy
Statistics, nonparametric
Abstract
Pulse therapy with methylprednisolone (Solu-Medrol, Upjohn), 1000 mg daily over three successive days, was administered to patients in two randomized groups of 14 patients in each (23 patients with systemic lupus erythematosus, 5 with rheumatoid arthritis). In one of the groups the drug was taken per os, the other received it intravenously. There was no significant difference between the two groups in terms of clinical effectiveness and incidence of side effects However, the time-related course of such indices as erythrocyte sedimentation rate, the level of leukocytes, of total protein, urea, the blood antioxidant potential, permeability of erythrocytic membranes and capillary and tissue barrier proteinuria as well as the content of immune complexes in the arterial and venous blood was more striking with per os intake. Of the 14 patients, 11 demonstrated short-continued asymptomatic 35% rise in the activity of alaninaminotransferase.
PubMed ID
10050456 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Activity of leucine aminopeptidase of the blood serum in pregnant women with late toxicoses and some extragenital diseases]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature66748
Source
Pediatr Akus Ginekol. 1969 May-Jun;3:40-2
Publication Type
Article

399 records – page 1 of 40.