Skip header and navigation

Refine By

124 records – page 1 of 13.

11th Annual International Symposium in Obesity: 'Obesity in a modern world: when pleasure meets homeostasis'.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature150244
Source
Int J Obes (Lond). 2009 Jun;33 Suppl 2:S1-2
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2009
Author
D. Richard
P. Boisvert
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Medicine, Centre de recherche de I'Institut de cardiologie et de pneumologie de Québec, Université Laval, Québec City, Québec, Canada. Denis.Richard@crhl.ulaval.ca
Source
Int J Obes (Lond). 2009 Jun;33 Suppl 2:S1-2
Date
Jun-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Congresses as topic
Female
Homeostasis
Humans
Male
Obesity - physiopathology - psychology
Philosophy
Quebec
Reward
PubMed ID
19528972 View in PubMed
Less detail

Adaptation and psychometric evaluation of the Preparedness for Caregiving Scale, Caregiver Competence Scale and Rewards of Caregiving Scale in a sample of Swedish family members of patients with life-threatening illness.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature131417
Source
Palliat Med. 2012 Oct;26(7):930-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2012
Author
Annette Henriksson
Birgitta Andershed
Eva Benzein
Kristofer Arestedt
Author Affiliation
School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden. anette.he@telia.com
Source
Palliat Med. 2012 Oct;26(7):930-8
Date
Oct-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Adult
Aged
Caregivers - psychology
Family - psychology
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Psychiatric Status Rating Scales
Psychometrics
Questionnaires
Reward
Sweden
Abstract
Family members often take on many caring responsibilities, with complex issues and challenges to consider. Feelings of preparedness, competence and reward are identified as concepts that may protect caregiver wellbeing and decrease negative outcomes related to caregiving.
This study aimed to translate, adapt and psychometrically evaluate the Preparedness for Caregiving Scale, Caregiver Competence Scale and Rewards of Caregiving Scale in Swedish family members of patients with life threatening illness.
Correlational.
The study took place in four settings including advanced palliative care. The scales were tested in a sample of 125 family members of persons with life-threatening illness. All three scales were tested in relation to distribution of item and scale scores, missing data patterns, dimensionality, convergent validity and reliability.
The results in this study indicate that the Swedish versions of The Preparedness for Caregiving Scale, Caregiver Competence Scale and Rewards of Caregiving Scale are valid, reliable and user-friendly scales. Confirmatory factor analysis showed that the scales were unidimensional and all demonstrated Cronbach's alpha values of =0.9.
As a result of this study it is anticipated that the Preparedness for Caregiving Scale, Caregiver Competence Scale and Rewards of Caregiving Scale could provide a basis for collaborative research between different countries and make international studies more comparable and generalizable despite differences in language and culture.
PubMed ID
21908520 View in PubMed
Less detail

Adapting and enhancing PAX Good Behavior Game for First Nations communities: a mixed-methods study protocol developed with Swampy Cree Tribal Council communities in Manitoba.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature294532
Source
BMJ Open. 2018 02 15; 8(2):e018454
Publication Type
Evaluation Studies
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
02-15-2018
Author
Janique Fortier
Mariette Chartier
Sarah Turner
Nora Murdock
Frank Turner
Jitender Sareen
Tracie O Afifi
Laurence Y Katz
Marni Brownell
James Bolton
Brenda Elias
Corinne Isaak
Roberta Woodgate
Depeng Jiang
Author Affiliation
Department of Community Health Sciences, Rady Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Canada.
Source
BMJ Open. 2018 02 15; 8(2):e018454
Date
02-15-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Evaluation Studies
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Adolescent
Attitude
Child
Child Behavior
Child Behavior Disorders - ethnology - prevention & control
Cultural Competency
Female
Health Promotion - methods
Humans
Indians, North American
Male
Manitoba
Mental health
Play and Playthings
Program Evaluation
Research Design
Residence Characteristics
Reward
School Health Services
Schools
Social Behavior
Social Behavior Disorders - ethnology - prevention & control
Abstract
High rates of mental health problems, such as suicidal behaviours, among First Nations youth in Canada are a major public health concern. The Good Behavior Game (GBG) is a school-based intervention that provides a nurturing environment for children and has been shown to promote positive outcomes. PAX Good Behavior Game (PAX GBG) is an adaptation and enhancement of the GBG. While PAX GBG has been implemented in Indigenous communities, little research exists examining the cultural and contextual appropriateness and effectiveness of the intervention in First Nations communities.
The present paper describes a protocol of the mixed-methods approach guided by an Indigenous ethical engagement model adopted to implement, adapt and evaluate PAX GBG in First Nations communities in Manitoba, Canada. First, implementation outcomes (eg, acceptability, adoption) of PAX GBG will be evaluated using qualitative interviews with teachers, principals and community members from Swampy Cree Tribal Council (SCTC) communities. Second, by linking administrative databases to programme data from schools in 38 First Nations communities, we will compare PAX GBG and control groups to evaluate whether PAX GBG is associated with improved mental health and academic outcomes. Third, the qualitative results will help inform a cultural and contextual adaptation of PAX GBG called First Nations PAX (FN PAX). Fourth, FN PAX will be implemented in a few SCTC communities and evaluated using surveys and qualitative interviews followed by the remaining communities the subsequent year.
Ethical approval was obtained from the University of Manitoba Health Research Ethics Board and will be obtained from the Health Information Privacy Committee and respective data providers for the administrative database linkages. Dissemination and knowledge translation will include community and stakeholder engagement throughout the research process, reports and presentations for policymakers and community members, presentations at scientific conferences and journal publications.
Notes
Cites: Transcult Psychiatry. 2011 Sep;48(4):367-91 PMID 21911507
Cites: Drug Alcohol Depend. 2008 Jun 1;95 Suppl 1:S45-59 PMID 18243581
Cites: J Educ Psychol. 2009 Nov 1;101(4):926-937 PMID 23766545
Cites: Milbank Q. 2010 Sep;88(3):382-403 PMID 20860576
Cites: J Can Acad Child Adolesc Psychiatry. 2006 Nov;15(4):159-67 PMID 18392204
Cites: Clin Child Fam Psychol Rev. 2008 Sep;11(3):75-113 PMID 18712600
Cites: Can J Nurs Res. 2012 Jun;44(2):20-42 PMID 22894005
Cites: BMJ. 2013 Nov 20;347:f6753 PMID 24259324
Cites: Can J Public Health. 2015 Jun 24;106(6):e375-81 PMID 26680428
Cites: Clin Child Fam Psychol Rev. 2002 Dec;5(4):273-97 PMID 12495270
Cites: J Child Psychol Psychiatry. 1994 Feb;35(2):259-81 PMID 8188798
Cites: J Prim Prev. 2017 Apr;38(1-2):67-86 PMID 27807659
Cites: Health Place. 2009 Jun;15(2):403-11 PMID 18760954
Cites: J Health Soc Behav. 2002 Jun;43(2):207-22 PMID 12096700
Cites: Depress Anxiety. 2013 Oct;30(10):1030-45 PMID 23650186
Cites: Am J Public Health. 2012 Jul;102(7):1353-61 PMID 22676500
Cites: J Sch Psychol. 2013 Apr;51(2):187-99 PMID 23481084
Cites: Transcult Psychiatry. 2014 Jun;51(3):299-319 PMID 24855142
Cites: Int J Circumpolar Health. 2011 Apr;70(2):141-53 PMID 21524357
Cites: J Clin Psychol. 2011 Jan;67(1):99-110 PMID 20973032
Cites: Drug Alcohol Depend. 2008 Jun 1;95 Suppl 1:S60-73 PMID 18329189
Cites: Can J Psychiatry. 1998 Oct;43(8):816-22 PMID 9806088
Cites: J Clin Epidemiol. 1999 Jan;52(1):39-47 PMID 9973072
Cites: Soc Sci Med. 2012 May;74(10):1560-9 PMID 22464223
Cites: Int J Ment Health Syst. 2016 Sep 21;10 :58 PMID 27688797
Cites: J Am Acad Child Adolesc Psychiatry. 2009 Apr;48(4):400-3 PMID 19242383
Cites: Soc Sci Med. 2008 Jan;66(1):117-29 PMID 17919795
Cites: J Am Acad Child Adolesc Psychiatry. 2001 Nov;40(11):1337-45 PMID 11699809
Cites: Prev Sci. 2016 Feb;17 (2):145-56 PMID 26297498
Cites: Dev Psychol. 2003 Mar;39(2):292-308 PMID 12661887
Cites: CMAJ. 2011 May 17;183(8):E480-6 PMID 21555383
Cites: Drug Alcohol Depend. 2008 Jun 1;95 Suppl 1:S29-44 PMID 18249508
Cites: Drug Alcohol Depend. 2008 Jun 1;95 Suppl 1:S5-S28 PMID 18343607
Cites: Can J Aging. 2005 Spring;24 Suppl 1:153-70 PMID 16080132
Cites: Annu Rev Public Health. 2011;32:91-108 PMID 21219160
Cites: J Appl Behav Anal. 1969 Summer;2(2):119-24 PMID 16795208
Cites: Can J Psychiatry. 2012 Dec;57(12):745-51 PMID 23228233
Cites: J Am Acad Child Adolesc Psychiatry. 2005 Jun;44(6):557-64 PMID 15908838
Cites: Int J Soc Psychiatry. 2015 Dec;61(8):788-95 PMID 25953776
PubMed ID
29449291 View in PubMed
Less detail

Age-related associations between work over-commitment and zest for work among Swedish employees from a cross-sectional and longitudinal perspective.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature289925
Source
Work. 2017; 57(2):269-279
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
2017
Author
Roma Runeson-Broberg
Jean-Baptist du Prel
Peter Westerholm
Maria Nordin
Anders Knutsson
Lars Alfredsson
Göran Fahlén
Richard Peter
Author Affiliation
Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Uppsala University Hospital, Uppsala, Sweden.
Source
Work. 2017; 57(2):269-279
Date
2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Humans
Job Satisfaction
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Middle Aged
Occupational Health
Occupational Stress - psychology
Reward
Surveys and Questionnaires
Sweden
Workload - psychology
Abstract
In aging societies, zest for work may be pivotal when deciding to stay occupationally active longer. Psychosocial work stress is a prevalent public health problem and may have an impact on zest for work. Work over-commitment (WOC) is a personal coping strategy for work stress with excessive striving and a health risk. However, the long-term effect of WOC on zest for work is poorly understood.
To investigate the age-related associations of work over-commitment with zest for work.
During 1996-1998 and 2000-2003, predominantly industrial workers (n?=?2940) participated in the WOLF-Norrland study and responded to a questionnaire referring to socio-demographics, WOC, zest for work, effort-reward imbalance proxies, and mental health. Age-adjusted multiple logistic regressions were performed with original and imputed datasets.
Cross-sectionally, work overcommitted middle-aged employees had an increased prevalence of poor zest for work compared to their contemporaries without WOC (OR: 3.74 [95%-CI 2.19; 6.40]). However, in a longitudinal analysis associations between onset of 'poor zest for work' and the WOC subscales 'need for approval' (OR: 3.29 [95%-CI 1.04; 10.37]) and 'inability to withdraw from work' (OR: 5.14 [95%-CI 1.32; 20.03]) were observed.
The longitudinal findings among older employees could be relevant regarding the expected need to remain occupationally active longer.
PubMed ID
28582947 View in PubMed
Less detail

Anonymous semen donor recruitment without reimbursement in Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature156016
Source
Reprod Biomed Online. 2008;17 Suppl 1:15-20
Publication Type
Article
Date
2008
Author
Alfonso P Del Valle
Leanne Bradley
Tamer Said
Author Affiliation
Andrology Laboratory and Reproductive Tissue Bank. The Toronto Institute for Reproductive Medicine - ReproMed, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. Adelvalle@repromed.ca
Source
Reprod Biomed Online. 2008;17 Suppl 1:15-20
Date
2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Canada
Confidentiality
Economics
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Motivation
Questionnaires
Reward
Semen
Sperm Banks - economics
Tissue Donors - psychology
Tissue and Organ Procurement - economics
Abstract
A previous review of 22 studies from eight countries, conducted between 1980 and 2003, concluded that semen donors who are older, married or are fathers are less likely to be financially motivated. Despite the Assisted Human Reproduction Act coming into force in 2004, no data originating from Canada have been published on this topic. The objective of this study was to validate these findings in the Canadian population within the context of an anonymous semen donor programme in Canada. A survey of 301 donor applicants was conducted to collect demographic data including age, marital status, paternity status and occupation, in addition to information assessing donor eligibility and willingness to donate without reimbursement. Eligible candidates were screened to determine their acceptance or exclusion from the semen donor programme. The results showed that the relationships found between donor applicant demographics and their willingness to participate without reimbursement do not appear to be consistent with earlier published studies in various countries. Further screening resulted in a recruitment rate of less than 1%. Additional studies will be required to investigate the feasibility of altruistic semen donation programmes in Canada, and to determine the potential impact of these findings on Canadians who rely on donor gamete services to build their families.
PubMed ID
18644218 View in PubMed
Less detail

Assessing the effect of public health information by incentivised risk estimation: An example on Swedish snus.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature299929
Source
Int J Drug Policy. 2018 04; 54:51-57
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
04-2018
Author
Daniel Bergsvik
Ole Rogeberg
Author Affiliation
Norwegian Institute of Public Health, Department of Drug Policy, PO Box 4404, Nydalen, 0403 Oslo, Norway; Ragnar Frisch Centre for Economic Research, Gaustadalléen 21, 0349 Oslo, Norway. Electronic address: daniel.bergsvik@fhi.no.
Source
Int J Drug Policy. 2018 04; 54:51-57
Date
04-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Cigarette Smoking - adverse effects
Female
Health education
Humans
Male
Program Evaluation - methods
Reward
Risk Assessment - methods
Sweden
Tobacco, Smokeless - adverse effects
Abstract
The provision of accurate information on health damaging behaviours and products is a widely accepted and widespread governmental task. It is easily mismanaged. This study demonstrates a simple method which can help to evaluate whether such information corrects recipient risk beliefs.
Participants assess risks numerically, before and after being exposed to a relevant risk communication. Accuracy is incentivised by awarding financial prizes to answers closest to a pursued risk belief. To illustrate this method, 228 students from the University of Oslo, Norway, were asked to estimate the mortality risk of Swedish snus and cigarettes twice, before and after being exposed to one of three risk communications with information on the health dangers of snus.
The data allow us to measure how participants updated their risk beliefs after being exposed to different risk communications. Risk information from the government strongly distorted risk perceptions for snus. A newspaper article discussing the relative risks of cigarettes and snus reduced belief errors regarding snus risks, but increased belief errors regarding smoking. The perceived quality of the risk communication was not associated with decreased belief errors.
Public health information can potentially make the public less informed on risks about harmful products or behaviours. This risk can be reduced by targeting identified, measurable belief errors and empirically assessing how alternative communications affect these. The proposed method of incentivised risk estimation might be helpful in future assessments of risk communications.
PubMed ID
29414485 View in PubMed
Less detail

The association between psychosocial characteristics at work and problem drinking: a cross-sectional study of men in three Eastern European urban populations.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature173621
Source
Occup Environ Med. 2005 Aug;62(8):546-50
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2005
Author
M. Bobak
H. Pikhart
R. Kubinova
S. Malyutina
A. Pajak
H. Sebakova
R. Topor-Madry
Y. Nikitin
W. Caan
M. Marmot
Author Affiliation
International Centre for Health and Society, Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, University College London, UK. m.bobak@ucl.ac.uk
Source
Occup Environ Med. 2005 Aug;62(8):546-50
Date
Aug-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Alcohol Drinking - epidemiology - psychology
Alcoholic Intoxication
Cross-Sectional Studies
Czech Republic - epidemiology
Employment - psychology
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Odds Ratio
Poland - epidemiology
Reward
Russia - epidemiology
Socioeconomic Factors
Workplace
Abstract
Psychosocial factors at work are thought to influence health partly through health behaviours.
To examine the association between effort-reward imbalance and job control and several alcohol related measures in three eastern European populations.
A cross-sectional study was conducted in Novosibirsk (Russia), Krakow (Poland), and Karvina (Czech Republic). The participants completed a questionnaire that included effort-reward at work, job control, and a number of sociodemographic variables. Annual alcohol intake, annual number of drinking sessions, the mean dose of alcohol per drinking session, and binge drinking (> or =80 g of ethanol in one session at least once a week) were based on graduated frequencies in the questionnaire. Data were also available on problem drinking (> or =2 positive answers on CAGE questionnaire) and negative social consequences of drinking. All male participants in full employment (n = 694) were included in the present analyses.
After controlling for age and centre, all indices of alcohol consumption and problem drinking were associated with the effort-reward ratio. Adjustment for material deprivation did not change the results but adjustment for depressive symptoms reduced the estimated effects. Job control was not associated with any of the alcohol related outcomes.
The imbalance of effort-reward at work is associated with increased alcohol intake and problem drinking. The association appears to be partly mediated by depressive symptoms, which might be either an antecedent or a consequence of men's drinking behaviour.
Notes
Cites: Addiction. 1995 Apr;90(4):499-5137773113
Cites: J Epidemiol Community Health. 2004 Feb;58(2):131-514729894
Cites: Alcohol Alcohol. 2004 Jan-Feb;39(1):64-914691077
Cites: Int J Behav Med. 2003;10(2):125-4212763706
Cites: Lancet. 2002 Nov 9;360(9344):1448-5412433511
Cites: J Epidemiol Community Health. 2001 Sep;55(9):624-3011511640
Cites: Scand J Work Environ Health. 2001 Apr;27(2):146-5311409598
Cites: BMJ. 2001 May 19;322(7296):1233-611358781
Cites: Int J Epidemiol. 2000 Oct;29(5):785-9211034957
Cites: J Epidemiol Community Health. 2000 May;54(5):328-3210814651
Cites: Alcohol Clin Exp Res. 1995 Jun;19(3):647-557573788
Cites: Am J Public Health. 1996 Mar;86(3):324-318604756
Cites: Am J Public Health. 1996 Mar;86(3):332-408604757
Cites: J Epidemiol Community Health. 1997 Apr;51(2):167-719196646
Cites: Epidemiology. 1998 Jan;9(1):43-79430267
Cites: J Occup Health Psychol. 1996 Jan;1(1):27-419547031
Cites: J Epidemiol Community Health. 1998 Feb;52(2):93-1009578855
Cites: Am J Public Health. 1998 Jan;88(1):68-749584036
Cites: Alcohol Clin Exp Res. 1998 Jun;22(4):921-79660323
Cites: Scand J Work Environ Health. 1998 Jun;24(3):197-2059710372
Cites: J Stud Alcohol. 1999 Mar;60(2):203-810091958
Cites: Occup Environ Med. 1999 May;56(5):302-710472303
Cites: Soc Sci Med. 1990;31(10):1127-342274801
Cites: Br J Addict. 1992 Aug;87(8):1173-831511230
Cites: Am J Public Health. 1988 Oct;78(10):1336-423421392
Cites: Am J Public Health. 1988 Aug;78(8):910-83389427
Cites: JAMA. 1984 Oct 12;252(14):1905-76471323
Cites: Am J Public Health. 1981 Jul;71(7):694-7057246835
Cites: Addiction. 2004 Aug;99(8):1034-4115265100
Cites: Occup Environ Med. 2004 Mar;61(3):219-2414985516
Cites: J Epidemiol Community Health. 2004 Mar;58(3):238-4214966239
Cites: Soc Sci Med. 2004 Apr;58(8):1483-9914759692
Cites: Soc Sci Med. 2004 Apr;58(8):1475-8214759691
PubMed ID
16046607 View in PubMed
Less detail

Attention to nurses' rewarding - an interview study of registered nurses working in primary and private healthcare in Finland.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature281734
Source
J Clin Nurs. 2017 Apr;26(7-8):1042-1052
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2017
Author
Jaana Seitovirta
Katri Vehviläinen-Julkunen
Lasse Mitronen
Sara De Gieter
Tarja Kvist
Source
J Clin Nurs. 2017 Apr;26(7-8):1042-1052
Date
Apr-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Attitude of Health Personnel
Cross-Sectional Studies
Employee Incentive Plans
Female
Finland
Humans
Job Satisfaction
Male
Nurse's Role - psychology
Nursing Staff, Hospital - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Qualitative Research
Reward
Abstract
To identify meaningful types of rewards and the consequences of rewards as expressed by Finnish registered nurses working in primary and private healthcare.
Previous studies have found significant associations between nurses' rewards and both their commitment and job satisfaction. Furthermore, appropriate rewards can have beneficial effects on factors including workforce stability and occupational satisfaction that are highly important in times of nurse shortages.
A cross-sectional, qualitative interview study.
Data were collected via individual semi-structured interviews (n = 20) with registered nurses working in Finland's primary and private healthcare, and subjected to qualitative content analysis.
Six meaningful types of rewards were identified by the registered nurses: Financial compensation and benefits, Work-Life balance, Work content, Professional development, Recognition, and Supportive leadership. Rewards encouraged respondents to perform their work correctly and reinforced occupational satisfaction, but also caused feelings of envy and stress.
It is essential to pay attention to nurses' preferences for particular rewards and to reward management. When designing effective reward systems for registered nurses, it is not sufficient to provide financial rewards alone, as various kinds of non-financial rewards are both meaningful and necessary.
When trying to improve registered nurses' commitment and job satisfaction through reward management, it is important to listen to nurses' opinions to create a reward system that integrates financial and non-financial rewards and is fair from their perspective. Healthcare organisations that offer registered nurses a holistic reward system are more likely to retain satisfied and committed nurses at a time of increasing nursing shortages.
PubMed ID
27346394 View in PubMed
Less detail

Attitudes toward strategies to increase organ donation: views of the general public and health professionals.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature120265
Source
Clin J Am Soc Nephrol. 2012 Dec;7(12):1956-63
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2012
Author
Lianne Barnieh
Scott Klarenbach
John S Gill
Tim Caulfield
Braden Manns
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta, Canada.
Source
Clin J Am Soc Nephrol. 2012 Dec;7(12):1956-63
Date
Dec-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Attitude of Health Personnel
Canada
Data Collection
Female
Humans
Kidney Diseases - psychology
Kidney Transplantation - economics - psychology
Living Donors - supply & distribution
Male
Middle Aged
Motivation
Public Opinion
Reward
Tissue Donors - supply & distribution
Tissue and Organ Procurement - economics - ethics - methods
Young Adult
Abstract
The acceptability of financial incentives for organ donation is contentious. This study sought to determine (1) the acceptability of expense reimbursement or financial incentives by the general public, health professionals involved with organ donation and transplantation, and those with or affected by kidney disease and (2) for the public, whether financial incentives would alter their willingness to consider donation.
Web-based survey administered to members of the Canadian public, health professionals, and people with or affected by kidney disease asking questions regarding acceptability of strategies to increase living and deceased kidney donation and willingness to donate a kidney under various financial incentives.
Responses were collected from 2004 members of the Canadian public October 11-18, 2011; responses from health professionals (n=339) and people with or affected by kidney disease (n=268) were collected during a 4-week period commencing October 11, 2011. Acceptability of one or more financial incentives to increase deceased and living donation was noted in >70% and 40% of all groups, respectively. Support for monetary payment for living donors was 45%, 14%, and 27% for the public, health professionals, and people with or affected by kidney disease, respectively. Overall, reimbursement of funeral expenses for deceased donors and a tax break for living donors were the most acceptable.
The general public views regulated financial incentives for living and deceased donation to be acceptable. Future research needs to examine the impact of financial incentives on rates of deceased and living donors.
Notes
Cites: Transplantation. 2006 May 15;81(9):1249-5616699449
Cites: CMAJ. 2006 Mar 14;174(6):797-816534087
Cites: N Engl J Med. 1999 Dec 2;341(23):1725-3010580071
Cites: N Engl J Med. 2002 Jun 20;346(25):2002-512075064
Cites: J Heart Lung Transplant. 2003 Apr;22(4):389-41012681417
Cites: Am J Transplant. 2003;3 Suppl 4:114-2512694055
Cites: Am J Transplant. 2003 Aug;3(8):952-6012859529
Cites: Camb Q Healthc Ethics. 2001 Fall;10(4):377-8614533404
Cites: Med Care. 2004 Apr;42(4):378-8615076815
Cites: Lancet. 1991 Dec 7;338(8780):1441-31683431
Cites: JAMA. 1992 Apr 15;267(15):2037-81552637
Cites: Transplant Proc. 1992 Oct;24(5):2204-61413030
Cites: N Engl J Med. 1995 Aug 10;333(6):333-67609748
Cites: Kidney Int. 1996 Jul;50(1):235-428807593
Cites: Transplant Proc. 1997 Dec;29(8):32639414709
Cites: Transplant Proc. 1999 Aug;31(5):2181-410456008
Cites: Am J Transplant. 2005 Dec;5(12):2999-300816303016
Cites: Am J Transplant. 2009 Sep;9(9):2172-619624568
Cites: BMJ. 2006 Oct 7;333(7571):746-817023468
Cites: Am J Transplant. 2010 Nov;10(11):2488-9220977640
Cites: Scand J Public Health. 2011 Mar;39(2):156-6321239479
Cites: Clin Transplant. 2011 May-Jun;25(3):E312-921362049
Cites: Am J Transplant. 2012 Feb;12(2):306-1222176925
Cites: J Med Ethics. 2012 Aug;38(8):451-722180170
Cites: J Med Ethics. 2006 Jun;32(6):324-816731729
Cites: Fertil Steril. 2010 Feb;93(2):455-6619022427
Cites: Ann Intern Med. 2010 Mar 16;152(6):358-6520231566
Cites: Am J Transplant. 2010 Apr;10(4 Pt 2):987-100220420648
Cites: Am J Transplant. 2010 May;10(5):1221-720148809
Cites: N Engl J Med. 2010 Sep 9;363(11):1091-220825328
Cites: Am J Transplant. 2006 Nov;6(11):2548-5516889608
Cites: Am J Transplant. 2006 Nov;6(11):2774-8516952292
Cites: Clin J Am Soc Nephrol. 2006 Nov;1(6):1136-4517699338
Cites: Clin J Am Soc Nephrol. 2006 Nov;1(6):1146-717699339
Cites: Nephrol Dial Transplant. 2008 Mar;23(3):1039-4218029378
Comment In: Clin J Am Soc Nephrol. 2012 Dec;7(12):1917-923160262
PubMed ID
23024166 View in PubMed
Less detail

Can incentives undermine intrinsic motivation to participate in epidemiologic surveys?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature98040
Source
Eur J Epidemiol. 2010 Apr;25(4):231-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2010
Author
Marika Wenemark
Asa Vernby
Annika Lindahl Norberg
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine, Linköping University, 581 83, Linköping, Sweden. marika.wenemark@liu.se
Source
Eur J Epidemiol. 2010 Apr;25(4):231-5
Date
Apr-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Consumer Participation
Data Collection - statistics & numerical data
Epidemiologic Research Design
Female
Humans
Male
Motivation
Parents
Research Subjects - psychology
Reward
Sweden
Abstract
Response rates to surveys are decreasing. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the use of lottery tickets as incentives in an epidemiologic control group. A self-administered questionnaire was sent to parents in the municipality of Stockholm, Sweden, who were to be used as a control group in a study addressing stress in parents of children with cancer. A stratified random sample of 450 parents were randomized into three incentive groups: (a) no incentive; (b) a promised incentive of one lottery ticket to be received upon reply; (c) a promised incentive of one lottery ticket to be received upon reply and an additional lottery ticket upon reply within 1 week. The overall response rate across the three groups was 65.3%. The response rate was highest in the no incentive group (69.3%) and lowest in the one plus one lottery ticket group (62.0%). In a survival analysis, the difference between the two response curves was significant by the log-rank test (P = 0.04), with the no incentive group having a shorter time to response than the incentive group. Our findings suggest that the use of lottery tickets as incentives to increase participation in a mail questionnaire among parents may be less valuable or even harmful. Incentives may undermine motivation in studies in which the intrinsic motivation of the respondents is already high.
PubMed ID
20157845 View in PubMed
Less detail

124 records – page 1 of 13.