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Culture and language as social determinants of First Nations, Inuit and Metis health.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature295959
Source
National Collaborating Centre for Aboriginal Health. 12 pp.
Publication Type
Fact Sheet
Date
2016
community healing (Cohen, 2001, p. 143). Language maintenance and continuity are critical to revitalizing culture and to the survival of any Indigenous people (Battiste & Henderson, 2000). For Aboriginal 1 peoples in Canada, who bear a disproportionate burden of illness, revitalization of culture
  1 document  
Source
National Collaborating Centre for Aboriginal Health. 12 pp.
Date
2016
Language
English
Geographic Location
Canada
Publication Type
Fact Sheet
File Size
1260894
Keywords
Language
Health
First Nations
Inuit
Metis
Culture
Revitalization
Notes
"Social determinants of health"
Documents

FS-CultureLanguage-SDOH-FNMI-EN.pdf

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Ethnic identity, cultural pride, and generations of baggage: A personal experience

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature101974
Source
Arctic Anthropology. 29(2):182-191
Publication Type
Article
Date
1992
Author
Pullar, G.L.
Author Affiliation
Alaska Native Human Resource Development Program, University of Alaska Fairbanks
Source
Arctic Anthropology. 29(2):182-191
Date
1992
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alaska Natives
Alutiiq people
Cultural revitalization
Education system
Epidemics
Ethnic identity
Kodiak Island
Traditional practices
Abstract
Numerous Alaska Native groups have begun movements to preserve and revitalize their cultures. They believe that by bringing back traditional practices and values people will be increasingly proud of their heritage and thus feel better about themselves as Native people. Many feel that this raising of self-esteem, over a period of time, will create healthier individuals and communities. Research has revealed that the destructive symptoms being experienced today in Native communities are the result of several generations of catastrophic events. This paper describes the cultural revitalization movement of the Alutiiq people of Kodiak Island from the personal viewpoint of the author, who was president of the Kodiak Area Native Association during the movement?s inception. The author also describes his personal journey in developing cultural pride and his family history research that has revealed generations of alcohol abuse and other trauma.
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Language revitalization, cultural stabilization, and Eskaleut languages.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature299978
Source
The Arctic Institute. Center for Circumpolar Security Studies.
Publication Type
Article
Date
May 7, 2019
Author
Berge, Anna
Author Affiliation
Professor of Linguistics and a specialist on Eskaleut languages at the Alaska Native Language Center and Director of the Alaska Native Language Archive at the University of Alaska Fairbanks
Source
The Arctic Institute. Center for Circumpolar Security Studies.
Date
May 7, 2019
Language
English
Geographic Location
Canada
U.S.
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alaska
Language revitalization and usage
Indigenous rights
Culture
Abstract
The Arctic is at the forefront of potentially catastrophic climate change, affecting the survival of most forms of life. In comparison, discussions of language loss in the Arctic may seem trivial, and language researchers sometimes struggle to justify their research in such a context, particularly with respect to documentation and revitalization efforts. However, language loss is a reflection of cultural destabilization of communities in the Arctic, and thus a symptom of the broader problems of environmental change, sustainability, and adaptability. Is language revitalization, therefore, part of the solution? In the following article, I offer a perspective on this question, with special reference to the Eskaleut languages. The Eskaleut languages include Unangam Tunuu (formerly known as Aleut), spoken along the Aleutian Islands, Bering Island, and the Pribilof Islands; the Yupik languages, spoken in the Russian Far East, St. Lawrence Island, and Southwest Alaska; and the Inuit language group, spoken in northern Alaska, northern Canada, and Greenland.
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Medicine ways: Disease, health, and survival among Native Americans

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature102367
Source
Walnut Creek, CA: AltaMira Press
Publication Type
Book/Book Chapter
Date
2001
Author
Trafzer, CE, ed.
Wiener, D, ed.
Source
Walnut Creek, CA: AltaMira Press
Date
2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Book/Book Chapter
Physical Holding
University of Alaska Anchorage
Keywords
Alaska Natives
American Indians
Breast cancer
Community revitalization
Diabetes
Genetics
Health
Indian removal
Infant mortality
Inheritance
Pandemics
Public health nursing
Ritual healing
Trachoma
Typhoid fever
Youth gangs
Youth suicide
Abstract
These essays--written by American Indian and non-Indian historians, anthropologists, and health care professionals--weave a theme relating sociopolitical and socioeconomic variables to historic epidemiology, demonstrating that the processes of colonialism and neocolonialism continue to affect Native American health and health care.
Notes
Available at UAA/APU Consortium Library, General Collection, E98.M4 M43 2001
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Reconstructing Food Ways: Role of Skolt Sami Cultural Revitalization Programs in Local Plant Use.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature300845
Source
Journal of Ethnobiology v36 n1 (03 2016): 85-104.
Publication Type
Article
Date
2016
Author
Magnani, Natalia
Source
Journal of Ethnobiology v36 n1 (03 2016): 85-104.
Date
2016
Language
English
Geographic Location
Finland
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Cultural revitalization
Scots pine inner bark
chaga mushroom
Wild plants
Consumption trends
Abstract
Cultural programs, such as revitalization forums, support community goals of resilience, whether by conserving and recreating particular plant uses, or by fostering dynamic traditions marked by innovation and adoption of new wild food uses and ideologies. This paper explores the significance of traditional plant revitalization forums for the Sevettijärvi-Näätämö community, located in northern Finland in close proximity to Norwegian and Russian borders. Along with Finns and other Sami groups, this region comprises a significant Skolt Sami population present in the area since relocation from Petsamo (in particular Suenjel sijd) after World War II. The unique history of the region and past marginalization and assimilation pressures have stimulated current revitalization initiatives, which seek to celebrate Skolt Sami culture and revitalize traditional skills and knowledge, including food traditions. The study compares food tradition presentations during a summer cultural festival with ethnographic data on wild food use in Sevettijärvi-Näätämö. This comparison explores selection of knowledge for revitalization forums, and the potential impact of this selection on wild food use. Results show that the types of plant and fungi uses (in particular Inonotus obliquus and the inner bark of Pinus sylvestris) presented in revitalization forums reflect a blend of historical and recent nutritional influences. These plants and fungi may be well-known and recorded anthropologically or commercialized and commonly available. On the other hand, cultural programs focus on food traditions while excluding medicinal plants. Data on local plant use demonstrates that the degree to which revitalization forums impact plant use may depend on opportunities for acquiring skills through other avenues.
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Sami traditions: Márkomeannu's contribution to the revitalization of Sami food traditions.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature295943
Source
University of Tromsø Norway. Faculty of Humanities, Social Sciences and Education. Master of Philosophy in Indigenous Studies.
Publication Type
Dissertation
Date
Autumn 2014
Faculty of Humanities, Social Sciences and Education Sami traditions: Márkomeannu´s contribution to the revitalization of Sami food traditions Elisabeth Berg Thesis submitted for the Degree of Master of Philosophy in Indigenous Studies November 2014 i SAMI TRADITIONS: MÁRKOMEANNU`S
  1 document  
Author
Berg, Elisabeth
Source
University of Tromsø Norway. Faculty of Humanities, Social Sciences and Education. Master of Philosophy in Indigenous Studies.
Date
Autumn 2014
Language
English
Geographic Location
Norway
Publication Type
Dissertation
File Size
3175632
Keywords
Skånland
Sami
Traditional diet
Articulation
Revitalization
Globalization
Modernization
Abstract
This thesis focuses on the Márkomeannu festival’s contribution to the revitalization of food traditions. The study was conducted on the Márkomeannu festival in Skånland in Troms County, specifically in the Markasami areas in the rural hills of Skånland. The festival was chosen because it is an important arena for expression of indigeneity and culture. Many areas within the Sami community have suffered from assimilation and have afterwards gone through a process of revitalization. The process of revitalization of the culture, language, politics and history has been thoroughly studied and written about, but the revitalization of Sami traditional food has not been studied in detail. Food is an important cultural marker which works as building stones of each cultural foundation. Food can be both symbolic and be a purely practical necessity for a culture. The thesis establishes that some traditional dishes are adopted and adapted from international dishes. The results shows that traditional dishes are used to articulate the Sami culture, and that traditions can be adapted to a modern outlook, and also adapted to fit a Sami cultural profile. Márkomeannu as a cultural arena contributes to revitalization of food by creating a platform for cultural expression which can lead to a stronger Sami identity and a feeling of safety in expressing culture.
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6 records – page 1 of 1.