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Aberrant expression of the human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 oncogene is not a common feature in osteosarcoma.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature101871
Source
Hum Pathol. 2011 Jun;42(6):859-66
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2011
Author
Daniel Baumhoer
Jan Smida
Katja Specht
Karin Bink
Leticia Quintanilla-Martinez
Michael Rosemann
Heide Siggelkow
Walter B J Nathrath
Michael J Atkinson
Stefan Bielack
Gernot Jundt
Michaela Nathrath
Author Affiliation
Institute of Pathology, University Hospital Basel, 4031 Basel, Switzerland. dbaumhoer@mac.com
Source
Hum Pathol. 2011 Jun;42(6):859-66
Date
Jun-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Bone Neoplasms - genetics - metabolism - pathology
Child
Child, Preschool
DNA, Neoplasm - analysis
Female
Gene Expression Regulation, Neoplastic - physiology
Humans
Immunohistochemistry
In Situ Hybridization, Fluorescence
Male
Middle Aged
Oligonucleotide Array Sequence Analysis
Osteosarcoma - genetics - metabolism - pathology
Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide
Prognosis
RNA, Messenger - metabolism
Receptor, erbB-2 - genetics - metabolism
Reverse Transcriptase Polymerase Chain Reaction
Tumor Markers, Biological - genetics - metabolism
Young Adult
Abstract
Human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 expression in osteosarcoma and its relationship to prognosis have been the subject of several conflicting reports, most of them relying on immunohistochemical studies. Because the urgent need of prognostic markers and effective new treatment options for osteosarcoma patients, we evaluated the role of human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 in 2 well-characterized sets of pretherapeutic osteosarcoma samples (46 paraffin-embedded and 46 fresh-frozen biopsy samples) using immunohistochemistry with 2 different antibodies [DAKO A0485 (Glostrup, Denmark) and Novocastra CB11 (Newcastle, UK)] as well as fluorescence in situ hybridization, real-time polymerase chain reaction, and SNP array analyses and correlated our findings with clinicopathological parameters. However, our study failed to detect unequivocal evidence of human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 gene amplification or overexpression of human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 messenger RNA or protein in any of the investigated tumors. Only in a small subset of samples, a moderate increase in messenger RNA levels (13.6%) or focal membranous immunoreactivity (8.7%; A0485) was detected but did not correlate with survival or response to chemotherapy. Cytoplasmic staining was identified more frequently (63%; CB11) but again did not show any association with clinicopathological parameters. In conclusion, our study does not support a role for human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 as a prognostic marker in osteosarcoma.
PubMed ID
21292304 View in PubMed
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Abeta oligomer-mediated long-term potentiation impairment involves protein phosphatase 1-dependent mechanisms.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature162439
Source
J Neurosci. 2007 Jul 18;27(29):7648-53
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-18-2007
Author
Marlen Knobloch
Mélissa Farinelli
Uwe Konietzko
Roger M Nitsch
Isabelle M Mansuy
Author Affiliation
Division of Psychiatry Research, University of Zurich, 8008 Zurich, Switzerland.
Source
J Neurosci. 2007 Jul 18;27(29):7648-53
Date
Jul-18-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Amyloid Precursor Protein Secretases - genetics
Amyloid beta-Peptides - chemistry - metabolism - ultrastructure
Analysis of Variance
Animals
Calcium-Calmodulin-Dependent Protein Kinase Type 2
Calcium-Calmodulin-Dependent Protein Kinases - genetics
Dose-Response Relationship, Radiation
Electric Stimulation - methods
Excitatory Postsynaptic Potentials - drug effects - physiology
Gene Expression Regulation - genetics
Hippocampus - cytology
Humans
Long-Term Potentiation - genetics - physiology - radiation effects
Mice
Mice, Transgenic
Microscopy, Electron, Transmission - methods
Neurons - drug effects - physiology
Patch-Clamp Techniques
Phosphoprotein Phosphatases - physiology
Presenilin-1 - genetics
Protein Phosphatase 1
Reverse Transcriptase Polymerase Chain Reaction - methods
Abstract
Amyloid beta (Abeta) oligomers are derived from proteolytic cleavage of amyloid precursor protein (APP) and can impair memory and hippocampal long-term potentiation (LTP) in vivo and in vitro. They are recognized as the primary neurotoxic agents in Alzheimer's disease. The mechanisms underlying such toxicity on synaptic functions are complex and not fully understood. Here, we provide the first evidence that these mechanisms involve protein phosphatase 1 (PP1). Using a novel transgenic mouse model expressing human APP with the Swedish and Arctic mutations that render Abeta more prone to form oligomers (arcAbeta mice), we show that the LTP impairment induced by Abeta oligomers can be fully reversed by PP1 inhibition in vitro. We further demonstrate that the genetic inhibition of endogenous PP1 in vivo confers resistance to Abeta oligomer-mediated toxicity and preserves LTP. Overall, these results reveal that PP1 is a key player in the mechanisms of AD pathology.
PubMed ID
17634359 View in PubMed
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Absence of evidence of Borna disease virus infection in Swedish patients with Chronic Fatigue Syndrome.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature200265
Source
J Neurovirol. 1999 Oct;5(5):495-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-1999
Author
B. Evengård
T. Briese
G. Lindh
S. Lee
W I Lipkin
Author Affiliation
Department of Immunology, Microbiology, Pathology and Infectious Diseases, Clinic for Infectious Diseases, Karolinska Institutet at Huddinge University Hospital.
Source
J Neurovirol. 1999 Oct;5(5):495-9
Date
Oct-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Blotting, Western
Borna Disease - virology
Borna disease virus - immunology - isolation & purification - pathogenicity
Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay
Fatigue Syndrome, Chronic - virology
Female
Humans
Leukocytes, Mononuclear - chemistry - metabolism - virology
Male
Middle Aged
Reverse Transcriptase Polymerase Chain Reaction
Sweden
Abstract
Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (CFS) is characterized by debilitating fatigue, somatic symptoms and cognitive impairment. An infectious basis has been proposed; candidate agents include enteroviruses, herpesviruses, retroviruses and Borna disease virus (BDV), a novel neurotropic virus associated with neuropsychiatric disorders. Sera and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) from Swedish CFS patients were assayed for evidence of infection using ELISA and Western immunoblot for detection of antibodies to BDV proteins N, P and gp18; and using nested reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) for detection of BDV N- and P-gene transcripts. No specific immunoreactivity to BDV proteins was found in sera from 169 patients or 62 controls. No BDV N- or P-gene transcripts were found through RT-PCR analysis of PBMC from 18 patients with severe CFS. These results do not support a role for BDV in pathogenesis of CFS.
PubMed ID
10568886 View in PubMed
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Accuracy of rapid influenza diagnostic tests: a meta-analysis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature126634
Source
Ann Intern Med. 2012 Apr 3;156(7):500-11
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-3-2012
Author
Caroline Chartrand
Mariska M G Leeflang
Jessica Minion
Timothy Brewer
Madhukar Pai
Author Affiliation
CHU Sainte-Justine, Université de Montréal, Montreal Chest Institute, Quebec, Canada.
Source
Ann Intern Med. 2012 Apr 3;156(7):500-11
Date
Apr-3-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Antigens, Viral - analysis
Canada
Child
Humans
Immunochromatography - methods - standards
Influenza A Virus, H1N1 Subtype - immunology - isolation & purification
Influenza, Human - diagnosis
Reference Standards
Reverse Transcriptase Polymerase Chain Reaction
Sensitivity and specificity
Virology - methods
Abstract
Timely diagnosis of influenza can help clinical management.
To examine the accuracy of rapid influenza diagnostic tests (RIDTs) in adults and children with influenza-like illness and evaluate factors associated with higher accuracy.
PubMed and EMBASE through December 2011; BIOSIS and Web of Science through March 2010; and citations of articles, guidelines, reviews, and manufacturers.
Studies that compared RIDTs with a reference standard of either reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (first choice) or viral culture.
Reviewers abstracted study data by using a standardized form and assessed quality by using Quality Assessment of Diagnostic Accuracy Studies criteria.
159 studies evaluated 26 RIDTs, and 35% were conducted during the H1N1 pandemic. Failure to report whether results were assessed in a blinded manner and the basis for patient recruitment were important quality concerns. The pooled sensitivity and specificity were 62.3% (95% CI, 57.9% to 66.6%) and 98.2% (CI, 97.5% to 98.7%), respectively. The positive and negative likelihood ratios were 34.5 (CI, 23.8 to 45.2) and 0.38 (CI, 0.34 to 0.43), respectively. Sensitivity estimates were highly heterogeneous, which was partially explained by lower sensitivity in adults (53.9% [CI, 47.9% to 59.8%]) than in children (66.6% [CI, 61.6% to 71.7%]) and a higher sensitivity for influenza A (64.6% [CI, 59.0% to 70.1%) than for influenza B (52.2% [CI, 45.0% to 59.3%).
Incomplete reporting limited the ability to assess the effect of important factors, such as specimen type and duration of influenza symptoms, on diagnostic accuracy.
Influenza can be ruled in but not ruled out through the use of RIDTs. Sensitivity varies across populations, but it is higher in children than in adults and for influenza A than for influenza B.
Canadian Institutes of Health Research.
PubMed ID
22371850 View in PubMed
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Accurate molecular classification of kidney cancer subtypes using microRNA signature.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature137534
Source
Eur Urol. 2011 May;59(5):721-30
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2011
Author
Youssef M Youssef
Nicole M A White
Jörg Grigull
Adriana Krizova
Christina Samy
Salvador Mejia-Guerrero
Andrew Evans
George M Yousef
Author Affiliation
Department of Laboratory Medicine and Pathobiology, University of Toronto, Toronto, Canada.
Source
Eur Urol. 2011 May;59(5):721-30
Date
May-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adenoma, Oxyphilic - classification - diagnosis - genetics
Carcinoma, Renal Cell - classification - diagnosis - genetics
Cluster analysis
Decision Trees
Diagnosis, Differential
Gene Expression Profiling - methods
Gene Expression Regulation, Neoplastic
Genetic Testing - methods
Humans
Kidney Neoplasms - classification - diagnosis - genetics
MicroRNAs - analysis
Oligonucleotide Array Sequence Analysis
Ontario
Predictive value of tests
Reproducibility of Results
Reverse Transcriptase Polymerase Chain Reaction
Terminology as Topic
Tumor Markers, Biological - genetics
Abstract
Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) encompasses different histologic subtypes. Distinguishing between the subtypes is usually made by morphologic assessment, which is not always accurate.
Our aim was to identify microRNA (miRNA) signatures that can distinguish the different RCC subtypes accurately.
A total of 94 different subtype cases were analysed. miRNA microarray analysis was performed on fresh frozen tissues of three common RCC subtypes (clear cell, chromophobe, and papillary) and on oncocytoma. Results were validated on the original as well as on an independent set of tumours, using quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) analysis with miRNA-specific primers.
Microarray data were analysed by standard approaches. Relative expression for qRT-PCR was determined using the ??C(T) method, and expression values were normalised to small nucleolar RNA, C/D box 44 (SNORD44, formerly RNU44). Experiments were done in triplicate, and an average was calculated. Fold change was expressed as a log(2) value. The top-scoring pairs classifier identified operational decision rules for distinguishing between different RCC subtypes and was robust under cross-validation.
We developed a classification system that can distinguish the different RCC subtypes using unique miRNA signatures in a maximum of four steps. The system has a sensitivity of 97% in distinguishing normal from RCC, 100% for clear cell RCC (ccRCC) subtype, 97% for papillary RCC (pRCC) subtype, and 100% accuracy in distinguishing oncocytoma from chromophobe RCC (chRCC) subtype. This system was cross-validated and showed an accuracy of about 90%. The oncogenesis of ccRCC is more closely related to pRCC, whereas chRCC is comparable with oncocytoma. We also developed a binary classification system that can distinguish between two individual subtypes.
MiRNA expression patterns can distinguish between RCC subtypes.
Notes
Comment In: Eur Urol. 2011 May;59(5):731-321296486
PubMed ID
21272993 View in PubMed
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Acquired macrolide resistance genes in pathogenic Neisseria spp. isolated between 1940 and 1987.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature182672
Source
Antimicrob Agents Chemother. 2003 Dec;47(12):3877-80
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2003
Author
Sydney Cousin
William L H Whittington
Marilyn C Roberts
Author Affiliation
Department of Pathobiology, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington 98195, USA.
Source
Antimicrob Agents Chemother. 2003 Dec;47(12):3877-80
Date
Dec-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Anti-Bacterial Agents - pharmacology
Conjugation, Genetic
Denmark - epidemiology
Drug Resistance, Bacterial
Genes, Bacterial - genetics
Genotype
Gonorrhea - epidemiology - microbiology
Humans
In Situ Hybridization
Meningococcal Infections - epidemiology - microbiology
Methyltransferases - genetics
Neisseria gonorrhoeae - drug effects - genetics
Neisseria meningitidis - drug effects - genetics
Promoter Regions, Genetic - genetics
Reverse Transcriptase Polymerase Chain Reaction
Time Factors
Abstract
Seventy-six Neisseria gonorrhoeae isolates, isolated between 1940 and 1987, and seven Neisseria meningitidis isolates, isolated between 1963 and 1987, were screened for the presence of acquired mef(A), erm(B), erm(C), and erm(F) genes by using DNA-DNA hybridization, PCR analysis, and sequencing. The mef(A), erm(B), and erm(F) genes were all identified in a 1955 N. gonorrhoeae isolate, while the erm(C) gene was identified in a 1963 N. gonorrhoeae isolate. Similarly, both the mef(A) and erm(F) genes were identified in a 1963 N. meningitidis isolate. All four acquired genes were found in later isolates of both species. The mef(A) gene from a 1975 N. gonorrhoeae isolate was sequenced and had 100% DNA and amino acid identity with the mef(A) gene from a 1990s Streptococcus pneumoniae isolate. Selected early isolates were able to transfer their acquired genes to an Enterococcus faecalis recipient, suggesting that these genes are associated with conjugative transposons. These isolates are the oldest of any species to carry the mef(A) gene and among the oldest to carry these erm genes.
Notes
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PubMed ID
14638497 View in PubMed
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Activity of the pituitary-gonadal axis is increased prior to the onset of spawning migration of chum salmon.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature90768
Source
J Exp Biol. 2009 Jan;212(Pt 1):56-70
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2009
Author
Onuma Takeshi A
Sato Shunpei
Katsumata Hiroshi
Makino Keita
Hu Weiwei
Jodo Aya
Davis Nancy D
Dickey Jon T
Ban Masatoshi
Ando Hironori
Fukuwaka Masa-Aki
Azumaya Tomonori
Swanson Penny
Urano Akihisa
Author Affiliation
Graduate School of Bioresource and Bioenvironmental Sciences, Kyushu University, Fukuoka 812-8581, Japan. takeshikiai@msn.com
Source
J Exp Biol. 2009 Jan;212(Pt 1):56-70
Date
Jan-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Analysis of Variance
Animal Migration - physiology
Animals
DNA Primers - genetics
DNA, Mitochondrial - genetics
Follicle Stimulating Hormone, beta Subunit - metabolism
Gonadal Steroid Hormones - blood
Gonads - metabolism - physiology
Haplotypes - genetics
Microarray Analysis
Oncorhynchus keta - physiology
Pacific Ocean
Pituitary Gland - metabolism - physiology
RNA, Messenger - metabolism
Radioimmunoassay
Reverse Transcriptase Polymerase Chain Reaction
Seasons
Sexual Behavior, Animal - physiology
Abstract
The activity of the pituitary-gonadal axis (PG axis) in pre-migratory and homing chum salmon was examined because endocrine mechanisms underlying the onset of spawning migration remain unknown. Pre-migratory fish were caught in the central Bering Sea in June, July and September 2001, 2002 and 2003, and in the Gulf of Alaska in February 2006. They were classified into immature and maturing adults on the basis of gonadal development. The maturing adults commenced spawning migration to coastal areas by the end of summer, because almost all fish in the Bering Sea were immature in September. In the pituitaries of maturing adults, the copy numbers of FSHbeta mRNA and the FSH content were 2.5- to 100-fold those of the immature fish. Similarly, the amounts of LHbeta mRNA and LH content in the maturing adults were 100- to 1000-fold those of immature fish. The plasma levels of testosterone, 11-ketotestosterone and estradiol were higher than 10 nmol l(-1) in maturing adults, but lower than 1.0 nmol l(-1) in immature fish. The increase in the activity of the PG-axis components had already initiated in the maturing adults while they were still in the Gulf of Alaska in winter. In the homing adults, the pituitary contents and the plasma levels of gonadotropins and plasma sex steroid hormones peaked during upstream migration from the coast to the natal hatchery. The present results thus indicate that the seasonal increase in the activity of the PG axis is an important endocrine event that is inseparable from initiation of spawning migration of chum salmon.
PubMed ID
19088211 View in PubMed
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Adrenomedullin modulates hemodynamic and cardiac effects of angiotensin II in conscious rats.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature9538
Source
Am J Physiol Regul Integr Comp Physiol. 2004 Jun;286(6):R1085-92
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2004
Author
Marja Luodonpää
Hanna Leskinen
Mika Ilves
Olli Vuolteenaho
Heikki Ruskoaho
Author Affiliation
Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, Biocenter Ouli, University of Oulu, 90014 Oulu, Finland.
Source
Am J Physiol Regul Integr Comp Physiol. 2004 Jun;286(6):R1085-92
Date
Jun-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Angiotensin II - antagonists & inhibitors - pharmacology
Animals
Blood Pressure - drug effects
Body Weight - drug effects
Echocardiography
Heart - drug effects
Heart Rate - drug effects
Hemodynamic Processes - drug effects
Hypertension - chemically induced - prevention & control
Hypertrophy, Left Ventricular - chemically induced - prevention & control
Intracellular Signaling Peptides and Proteins
Male
Membrane Proteins - biosynthesis - genetics
Norepinephrine - antagonists & inhibitors - pharmacology
Peptides - pharmacology
Peptidyl-Dipeptidase A - biosynthesis - genetics
Rats
Rats, Sprague-Dawley
Receptor, Angiotensin, Type 1 - biosynthesis - genetics
Receptors, Peptide - biosynthesis - genetics
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Reverse Transcriptase Polymerase Chain Reaction
Telemetry
Vasoconstrictor Agents - antagonists & inhibitors
Vasodilator Agents - pharmacology
Abstract
We examined whether adrenomedullin, a vasoactive peptide expressed in the heart, modulates the increase in blood pressure, changes in systolic and diastolic function, and left ventricular hypertrophy produced by long-term administration of ANG II or norepinephrine in rats. Subcutaneous administration of adrenomedullin (1.5 microg.kg(-1).h(-1)) for 1 wk inhibited the ANG II-induced (33.3 microg.kg(-1).h(-1) sc) increase in mean arterial pressure by 67% (P
PubMed ID
14751847 View in PubMed
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Adult-onset calorie restriction delays the accumulation of mitochondrial enzyme abnormalities in aging rat kidney tubular epithelial cells.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature78534
Source
Am J Physiol Renal Physiol. 2007 Jun;292(6):F1751-60
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2007
Author
McKiernan Susan H
Tuen Victoria C
Baldwin Katherine
Wanagat Jonathan
Djamali Arjang
Aiken Judd M
Author Affiliation
Department of Animal Health and Biomedical Sciences, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI 53706, USA. mckiernan@svm.vetmed.wisc.edu
Source
Am J Physiol Renal Physiol. 2007 Jun;292(6):F1751-60
Date
Jun-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aging - physiology
Animals
Body Weight - physiology
Caloric Restriction
DNA, Mitochondrial - genetics
Diet
Electron Transport Complex IV - metabolism
Epithelial Cells - enzymology
Gene Deletion
Kidney Tubules - cytology - enzymology
Lasers
Male
Mitochondria - enzymology
Organ Size - physiology
Rats
Rats, Inbred F344
Reverse Transcriptase Polymerase Chain Reaction
Succinate Dehydrogenase - metabolism
Abstract
Adult-onset calorie restriction (A-CR) is an experimental model of life extension and healthy aging less explored, compared with calorie restriction begun at early ages, but one more realistic for human application. We examined the effect of A-CR on the aging rat kidney with respect to common structural age-dependent changes and the accumulation of mitochondrial enzyme abnormalities in tubular epithelial cells. A 40% calorie restriction was initiated in middle-aged rats, before the onset of significant age-related changes in the Fischer x Brown Norway rat kidney. This dietary intervention effectively reduced glomerulosclerosis and tubular atrophy within 6 mo and changed the rate of interstitial fibrosis formation within 1 yr and vascular wall thickening and the expression cytochrome c oxidase (COX)-deficient tubular epithelial cells in 18 mo compared with age-matched ad libitum-fed rats. Our histological approach (histochemical staining for mitochondrial enzyme activity and laser capture microdissection) coupled with mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) PCR analyses demonstrated that COX-deficient renal tubular epithelial cells accumulated mtDNA deletion mutations and that these cells contained unique, clonally expanded mtDNA deletion mutations. Renal tubular epithelial cells with mitochondrial abnormalities presented cellular characteristics indicative of physiological dysfunction.
PubMed ID
17344189 View in PubMed
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Age-dependent increase in oxidative stress in gastrocnemius muscle with unloading.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature91973
Source
J Appl Physiol. 2008 Dec;105(6):1695-705
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2008
Author
Siu Parco M
Pistilli Emidio E
Alway Stephen E
Author Affiliation
Dept. of Health Technology and Informatics, The Hong Kong Polytechnic Univ., Hung Hom, Kowloon, Hong Kong, China. htpsiu@inet.polyu.edu.hk
Source
J Appl Physiol. 2008 Dec;105(6):1695-705
Date
Dec-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aging - physiology
Animals
Blotting, Western
Catalase - metabolism
Female
Hindlimb Suspension - physiology
Hydrogen Peroxide - metabolism
Male
Malondialdehyde - metabolism
Muscle, Skeletal - growth & development - metabolism - physiology
Organ Size - physiology
Oxidative Stress - physiology
Rats
Rats, Inbred BN
Rats, Inbred F344
Reverse Transcriptase Polymerase Chain Reaction
Superoxide Dismutase - metabolism
Tyrosine - analogs & derivatives - metabolism
Abstract
Oxidative stress increases during unloading in muscle from young adult rats. The present study examined the markers of oxidative stress and antioxidant enzyme gene and protein expressions in medial gastrocnemius muscles of aged and young adult (30 and 6 mo of age) Fischer 344 x Brown Norway rats after 14 days of hindlimb suspension. Medial gastrocnemius muscle weight was decreased by approximately 30% in young adult and aged rats following suspension. When muscle weight was normalized to animal body weight, it was reduced by 12% and 22% in young adult and aged rats, respectively, after suspension. Comparisons between young adult and aged control animals demonstrated a 25% and 51% decline in muscle mass when expressed as absolute muscle weight and muscle weight normalized to the animal body weight, respectively. H(2)O(2) content was elevated by 43% while Mn superoxide dismutase (MnSOD) protein content was reduced by 28% in suspended muscles compared with control muscles exclusively in the aged animals. Suspended muscles had greater content of malondialdehyde (MDA)/4-hydroxyalkenals (4-HAE) (29% and 58% increase in young adult and aged rats, respectively), nitrotyrosine (76% and 65% increase in young adult and aged rats, respectively), and catalase activity (69% and 43% increase in young adult and aged rats, respectively) relative to control muscles. Changes in oxidative stress markers MDA/4-HAE, H(2)O(2), and MnSOD protein contents in response to hindlimb unloading occurred in an age-dependent manner. These findings are consistent with the hypotheses that oxidative stress has a role in mediating disuse-induced and sarcopenia-associated muscle losses. Our data suggest that aging may predispose skeletal muscle to increased levels of oxidative stress both at rest and during unloading.
PubMed ID
18801960 View in PubMed
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445 records – page 1 of 45.